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Posted

[quote name='DavidM' timestamp='1321981533' post='594469581']
I'm against the "blind dog lovers" in this thread, an animal bit a little girl and she has to have facial reconstruction surgury, but lets all make excuses for the animal. "Oh we know EVERY SINGLE golden retriver is perfect and would HAVE to had a child so something HORRIBLE in order to bite."
[/quote]

That little girl was under her grandparents care, who should have stopped her in the first place from obviously provoking the animal

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Posted

...Literally down the street from me, again. Why Florida? Why?

I would of probably done the same. A dog bites my child or grandchild? It'll be lucky if it survives what I do to it.

If a dog isn't properly trained, or is snippy - Then maybe it should of been left at home? Or in the car with the windows rolled down? It's a pet.

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Posted

[quote name='htcz' timestamp='1321979631' post='594469477']
100% behind the grandfather.
[/quote]

Indeed

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Posted

Out of context article much?
If the dog attacked the girl due to the girl harassing it, it was the girl's fault (and therefore her caregivers' fault).
If the grandfather stabbed the dog while it was attacking his granddaughter (i.e. he stabbed it to make it stop -although IDK why he wouldn't just hit it, as that would take less time), I'd say it was justified.
The grandfather is in the wrong no matter what for allowing his 4 year old granddaughter to "approach" an unknown dog.
Also, TBH, a Golden Retriever v.s. a 4 year old girl... If the dog really wanted to do damage, the girl would have a lot worse than a damaged lip (that's if she survived). The dog was probably just warning her.


[quote name='secureteam' timestamp='1322046878' post='594471317']
Obfuscation is confusing a hacker by means of hiding the actual code without disturbing the actual runtime nature of the program or code. Thus while obfuscating your code you need to take care that the effect of actual code is not disturbed at any cost. This is quite a tricky mode of safeguarding one's intellectual property but so far it has been quite effective in saving unsuspecting coders and developers from hackers. Reverse engineering the most favorite tool among hackers all across the world is rendered redundant with this technology.
[/quote]
The ****?

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Posted

48 year old [b]grandfather. [/b]Point proven?
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Posted

This thread sickens me, the damn right presumption that the dog is wrong straight away blows my mind. Dogs have been trained for thousands of years and the only "attacks" i see recently in the news and papers include children.... Children don't know how to treat animals, children dont realize their ****ing a dog off and the problem comes with the only way a dog can tell you to stop is by attacking. Now the fact the dog only bit the child once and didnt maim her shows that the dog was acting in self defense which makes me more inclined to side with the dog on this one. The grandfather is a terrible human being, he attacks an animal viciously because of his failure to look after and observe his granddaughter, any sane person would take the child to the to dog with supervision, or at least pet the dog themselves first to understand whether it is safe or not.

I think the grandfather should answer to the RSPCA(or equivalent) and also the child protective services, as clearly this little girl is better without this sort of "role model".
I myself love Labs and Golden Retrievers due to the fact we have had them in my family since i was born and at no point even at a few years old was i ever worried that the dog would attack me, sure i teased him but i knew the limit, this girl clearly did not. I would never see harm come to any animal and it ****es me off that people seem to been cool with 1. this grandfather carrying a knife, 2. He attacked the dog im guessing while the child was still there hence causing even more distress to the child and 3. He went straight for the neck, clearly out to kill the dog.

Whether or not you class me as a "blind dog lover" or not you cannot deny that this is ****ed up on both parts, however i still lean more towards to the dog considering the reasons i gave earlier in the post.

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Posted

100% behind the dog.
There's a reason some dogs don't like kids.
I wonder if the kid actually did approach the dog to pet it in a non threatening way. Sure kids don't know better, but the Grandfather should have known better than to let his grandchild approach an unknown dog.

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Posted

OK, little story...

When I was a kid, my grandparents had a mobile caravan they used to take us on holiday in. They also had a Red Setter dog named Ajax.

Ajax was getting old, he was a bit cranky, but he was still good with kids - he would rather run away than growl or snap. Just that he had a "oh lord, you're here again" attitude about him.

We were playing in the caravan, me, my brother and 2 friends. They were jumping from couch to couch over the gap in the middle. In this gap was a metal ring into which the table slotted.

James, one of the kids tripped, fell, landed NEAR the dog who whelped and ran off. When James got up his nose was covered in blood. He had caught the bridge of his nose on the metal ring.

He told everyone, and they believed him, that the dog bit him. I argued the case, but was ignored.

Ajax was put down.

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Posted

[quote name='nik louch' timestamp='1322051420' post='594471401']
OK, little story...

When I was a kid, my grandparents had a mobile caravan they used to take us on holiday in. They also had a Red Setter dog named Ajax.

Ajax was getting old, he was a bit cranky, but he was still good with kids - he would rather run away than growl or snap. Just that he had a "oh lord, you're here again" attitude about him.

We were playing in the caravan, me, my brother and 2 friends. They were jumping from couch to couch over the gap in the middle. In this gap was a metal ring into which the table slotted.

James, one of the kids tripped, fell, landed NEAR the dog who whelped and ran off. When James got up his nose was covered in blood. He had caught the bridge of his nose on the metal ring.

He told everyone, and they believed him, that the dog bit him. I argued the case, but was ignored.

Ajax was put down.
[/quote]

I feel for you man, nothing sadder than loosing a truly loyal kind dog.

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Posted

When writing that I got about half way and realised that it didn't actually back up the point I was going to make! LOL

That being, a kid rushing at a dog is not good in any situation:
* The kid doesn't know the dogs reactions
* The dog doesn't know the kids intentions
* The adult supervisor doesn't know either and should know better than to let this happen

Remember the kid aproached the dog first.

Also, many playful dogs with put their face to yours, dogs have teeth, always be aware of this. A catch can happen without a bite. Again the grandad should know better!

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Posted

Too many people are assuming too many unknown details in this thread.

1) We don't know whether the girl did anything to provoke the dog.
2) We don't know whether the dog has any mental problems or not.
3) We don't know whether the father had to use such force (or force of some degree) to stop the dog from doing more damage.
4) We don't know how the girl was able to go up to a strange dog without being stopped by the grandparent or carers; it may have somehow been an event the carers couldn't stop.

We don't know enough about this case to be able to place the blame on anyone.

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Posted

We don't know the whole story from what it appears but in general stabbing a dog is not cool as dogs in general are pretty kind only way doing that would be justified in my mind is if he had no choice. but my guess is it was probably a revenge thing as i can't really see that dog being aggressive to the point he would have had time to notice the kid was being attacked as my guess it was a quick reaction bite from the kid probably handling the dog way to roughly so most likely it was a revenge sort of thing on the grandfathers part as i doubt very much that the dog was more than just a quick snap at the kid as for him to stab the dog twice i doubt very much the dog was posing any real threat at that time.

i think that's why people are defending the dog in here as dogs are generally so nice/innocent where as humans can be cruel etc. (i know it's a 4 year old but as others have said it makes you wonder if the kid provoked it as like was said kids can be quite rough with a dog as they don't realize how rough they are with them at that age i don't think)

i just hope the kid is OK and her lip is not to bad.

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Posted

Charge the little girl with assault and the old fart with attempted murder, I say.

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Posted

i love dogs, i've had one and he was a treasured companion but in this situation, i am with the Grandfather. If an unknown animal attacked one of my children i'd possibly react the same way. Assuming the life or safety of the child was still at stake.

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Posted

[quote name='Callum' timestamp='1322053762' post='594471435']
Too many people are assuming too many unknown details in this thread.

1) We don't know whether the girl did anything to provoke the dog.
2) We don't know whether the dog has any mental problems or not.
[s]3) We don't know whether the father had to use such force (or force of some degree) to stop the dog from doing more damage.[/s]
4) We don't know how the girl was able to go up to a strange dog without being stopped by the grandparent or carers; it may have somehow been an event the carers couldn't stop.

We don't know enough about this case to be able to place the blame on anyone.
[/quote]
#3 is the only one I will completely disagree. While I am still new to fatherhood I know enough that it is my responsibility to protect my child at all costs. Part of that is knowing who or what is around my child, including strange dogs. There are not too many 4 year olds out there that are not interested in everything they see and the kids guardian should have known better. Growing up my parents never let me walk up to a dog and start petting it, even today when I walk my dogs parents usually ask me first if their kid can pet my dogs.
Aside from that the rest of the story has too many unanswered questions that we will most likely not get answered. So my conclusion to all of this with whatever information I have from the article, I place full blame on the guardian of the child and the dog owner (if there is one)

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Posted

If the dog wanted to harm her it would have gone for the throat.

I had a similar thing happen to me as a kid. I cuddled the dog to tight, the dog got scared and nipped me in the face.
This dog had known me for years, what happened to the dog? Nothing! because it was my own damn fault.

If there is anyone at fault its the grandfather, because he shouldn't have allowed her to approach a strange dog in the first place.
This is where Cesar Millian's rule of thumb comes into place when meeting a strange dog: No talk, no touch, no eye-contact.

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Posted

When I was around 5, my dog bit me in the face and I had to have stitches, I still have a scar. It was totally my fault, I was trying to get him into the bathroom, but he had a complete fear of taking baths. My dad beat him half to death, which I felt horrible about since it was my own fault really.

Do I think the dog in the story deserved to be stabbed? Hell no. The punishment does not fit the crime, and in all likelihood the kid did something to provoke it. Stabbing a dog will not teach it a lesson, if anything it will be more aggressive towards strangers.

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Posted

Unless the dog was making a life-threatening attack, I would not try killing a dog.

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