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TrickierStinky

dslr Given a Cannon 10D and Clueless

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Hi guys,

Over the Crimbo period I was given a 10D to get me started in the camera world...... and I've read a few tutorials(Including the one on here) but I have to be frank. I'm lost? it all looks like vodoo magic!

Don't get me wrong I understand that altering the apeture setting will help me aquire a depth of field, that ISO settings will allow me to alter the light exporsure and noise, and that shutter speed will also affect light that seeps in which will allow moving objects to blur and such.

The issue I have is knowing how to get the right settings for the enviroment, I know I could keep doing test shots and play around with the settings that way but is there not a faster way a rule of thumb to use to gauge the settings required?

I'm looking to take landscape and enviormental shots which could range from a shot of a castle to a light trail of cars on the motorway to a fly on a flower. I just don't want the photo opt to pass beacuse I'm fiddling around with the camera setting.

Any advice that could be given would be greatly apprecitated, also tips from 10Der's would be brilliant as well however I know its a old DSLR so I don't know if that will happen :)

Please help I would love to get into this and just don't want fall at the firt hurdle out of frustration that I can't acheive the shot I'm after.

Thanks Matt

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The issue I have is knowing how to get the right settings for the enviroment, I know I could keep doing test shots and play around with the settings that way but is there not a faster way a rule of thumb to use to gauge the settings required?

Generally... no. The best way to learn something is practice. Ansel Adams roughly said "your first 10,000 frames are crap." In the digital age, I'd bump that to 100,000.

So... just get practicing. Post images everywhere and ask for tips. Find photographers who inspire you and follow their blogs/work/books.

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Generally... no. The best way to learn something is practice. Ansel Adams roughly said "your first 10,000 frames are crap." In the digital age, I'd bump that to 100,000.

So... just get practicing. Post images everywhere and ask for tips. Find photographers who inspire you and follow their blogs/work/books.

Oh dont get me wrong I know that I need to practice to get good. I just wondered if there was a guide to get an idea on what setting such as good light go for range ..... To get a decent basic photo. Then once I have the basic settings I tweak to get the photo how I want it?

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I got my 550D a few months ago and I read loads of stuff and nothing really sunk in. So I just started taking pics and hoped for a good pic. Change settings and see what it does to your shot.

The lower the Iso setting the less grainy the shot will be (I try to keep mine at 100) but this means that if you don't have the lighting to carry it off then you will need a slower shutter speed to let the camera get enough light so the picture doesn't come out too dark. If you don't have a tripod or the target you are shooting is moving then the shot will be blurry. Try to find a mid way for the Iso and shutter speed.

Read a few articles and see if anything sinks in for you.

http://www.digital-p...s-for-beginners

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Yeah, best thing to do is just switch it to manual mode and never look back, you'll work out for yourself what you need to adjust and change, and what happens when you tweak particular settings.

Get out there, have a mess around with it, and you'll eventually become more confident with using it.

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Id advise to mess with AV mode and TV modes,

Av is for Depth of field, So you can blur the background, fore ground etc.

Tv is for setting the speed of the shutter,

This will cover some basics, taking photos of people and things AV. Tv for shooting Animals, things moving to either blur the legs or stop them dead, Also good for water, rivers or fountains.

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Bracket your photos. It helps you to find the perfect exposure. Common thing to do in the days of film.

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I typically leave ISO as low at it will go, unless i know i need more light, but then i've gotten pretty fast at changing aperture and shutter speed to match the lighting conditions and what i'm trying to do, just keep practicing with that. or if you NEED the faster shutter, then bump up ISO some

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Ansel Adams roughly said "your first 10,000 frames are crap."

That was Cartier-Bresson, but nice try.

1 person likes this

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Thanks Guys for the tips!

I guess it all seems very scary when your first get onto the scene...But I've got my mind set on at least producing something half decent!

Bracket your photos. It helps you to find the perfect exposure. Common thing to do in the days of film.

Also sorry to sound dumb but Bracket?

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Unable to reedit. However I've played around with still life photography to get a bit of practice and this seems to be the best shot I've got.

Hooked

6652820509_21bdf305dd_z.jpg

Is there anything you would improve? I don't mean the composition or subject I mean aperture and shutter speed?

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I really like it, You've cropped it perfectly imo

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Looks good in my opinion. Just ask yourself this question: does the picture look like the real life scene? If yes then you did a fine job.

Only thing i can say is get a couple of books about photography, check out pictures of other people on flickr. And most important of all, keep on shooting!

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I really like it, You've cropped it perfectly imo

Looks good in my opinion. Just ask yourself this question: does the picture look like the real life scene? If yes then you did a fine job.

Only thing i can say is get a couple of books about photography, check out pictures of other people on flickr. And most important of all, keep on shooting!

Awesome thanks for the positive comments :) really appreciated.

The subject in your photo is underexposed.Read the following PDF to get an idea of how exposure works and essentially how to use spot metering to get good exposure - http://backroom.rend...metering%20.pdf

Hmmm, I never even noticed that to be honest. Thanks for the PDF will give it a read.

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The subject in your photo is underexposed.Read the following PDF to get an idea of how exposure works and essentially how to use spot metering to get good exposure - http://backroom.rend...metering%20.pdf

Thats a great read Andre thanks for that!

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Unable to reedit. However I've played around with still life photography to get a bit of practice and this seems to be the best shot I've got.

Hooked

Is there anything you would improve? I don't mean the composition or subject I mean aperture and shutter speed?

I would say that you need to up the exposure on it, since it's under-exposed, and also reduce the aperture so that the background behind the subject is less focused. Otherwise the composition is great.

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I was going to say exactly what Chasethebase said.

Also, a few people have been saying they keep the camera at ISO 100 or "as low as it will go" whenever they can.

I disagree. With todays SLRs I PERSONALLY believe that is not needed. I never bring my camera below 200 unless I NEED to (to make my shutter speed slower) that being said I try not to go above 400, again, unless needed.

I think if you have the mentality to keep it as low as possible you tend to forget about it, or if lighting changes quickly and you need to grab a fast shot your shutter speed will just be too slow (at 100) whereas you have a little extra "headroom" at ISO 200-400 and lighting drops and you need to take a quick shot

To add to the above, if I am doing CONTROLLED work, and I know what the lighting will be then sure, I will put the ISO as low as possible.

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