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Configuring SQL Server Express

sql server express

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#1 whitebread

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 17:05

How do I manage SQL Server Express visually? (as in, not via command line). I need to be able to create databases, create tables, etc. I believe that there is a program from Microsoft for this, but the name escapes me. :)


#2 HSoft

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 17:11

http://www.microsoft...lang=en&id=8961
Management Studio

#3 htcz

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 17:19

Thats it but if you are professionally going to go into SQL management, I suggest you find the command line equivilent of what you want to do and do it that way. Practice makes perfect.


MySQL Workbench actually generates the code when you (for example) create a database. I copy and paste and execute that code instead just to get used to some of the terms :)

#4 +Nik L

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 17:23

I don't know any professional database developers/managers that use command lines on Microsoft SQL. In fairness, most MySql developers I know tend to prefer GUI tools over command lines also.

#5 Prophecy

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Posted 18 March 2012 - 07:17

I m no DBA but as an SA Im constantly utilizing SMMS, there are alot of great features in the latest versions especially with the Wizards that make new DBAs a little more confident. SQL is a constant training experience I am always learning something new.

#6 PGHammer

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 11:54

I m no DBA but as an SA Im constantly utilizing SMMS, there are alot of great features in the latest versions especially with the Wizards that make new DBAs a little more confident. SQL is a constant training experience I am always learning something new.


A major use for SQL (at least in terms of Windows servers) is server/network administration (System Center 2007 and newer); however, that doesn't require you to write a lick of code.

Point of data - I am putting the finishing touches on the administration side of my virtualization lab. The front end is System Center 2012 (Configuration Manager, Endpoint Protection, and Virtual Machine Manager). SCCM and SCVMM have connected-but-separate SQL Server Express databases (built by their respective installers using default settings) - SQL Server 2012 Express itself costs nothing. (I could have used the full-sized SQL Server 2012 - however, it would be major overkill for a virtualization lab. For bigger administration tasks, System Center 2012 and its components fully support SQL Server 2012 - which itself can upgrade SQL Server 2012 Express, if usage require an upgrade.)

#7 PGHammer

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 11:19

I m no DBA but as an SA Im constantly utilizing SMMS, there are alot of great features in the latest versions especially with the Wizards that make new DBAs a little more confident. SQL is a constant training experience I am always learning something new.


SMMS doesn't require any code-writing, either. If you are using SMMS or System Center (any version), while all require some version of SQL Server, none require writing of code. The closest thing you may get to coding is writing PowerShell cmdlets.
I've been a DBA (dBase), and probably COULD write code (I have some SQL experience, though I am admittedly rusty in SQL admin) - however, the nice thing about SMMS (and System Center) is that you don't have to be a DBA (or know diddly about SQL) to leverage multiple SQL databases.