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Extending my wireless network range


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#1 Axel

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 11:01

I'm using a buffalo nfiniti router running ddwrt 2.4ghz. There's an area at the other end of my house which receives no signal. Is the following appropriate for this task?

http://www.amazon.co...t_ws_gb?ie=UTF8

Are there alternatives?

Does this essentially repeat the signal without broadcasting an additional ssid and without me needing to hook it up to the router using Ethernet cables?

Many thanks.


#2 OP Axel

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 20:32

Anyone?

#3 mint0

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 20:34

Seems like a suitable device, if you have 40 quid spare :)

edit: from the reviews on amazon it would seem that it is indeed a repeater so you wouldn't need to run a cable.

#4 TEX4S

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 05:36

I dont know how you have your wifi setup, but you might be messing things up by throwing in an access point. (especially if you cant bridge it to your existing network)

You need to ask some of the network gurus in here - but snagging an older Linksys AP w/ DD-WRT or Tomato and "bridging" it will do what you need.

But dont buy Buffalo, you made that mistake once, dont do it again. AND please please please dont say "well Ive had it for xxx years and its been great"

Always get the good stuff (Cisco/Linksys, Netgear, even ASUS) goin cheap is never a good idea when it comes to hardware.

#5 remixedcat

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 05:41

Duct tape and pringles cans

#6 spike21

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 05:54

I went the cheap route to start, http://www.amazon.co...33346051&sr=8-5

#7 OP Axel

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 13:26

Thanks guys - are there any other solutions that may do the job?

#8 OP Axel

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 13:30

I dont know how you have your wifi setup, but you might be messing things up by throwing in an access point. (especially if you cant bridge it to your existing network)

You need to ask some of the network gurus in here - but snagging an older Linksys AP w/ DD-WRT or Tomato and "bridging" it will do what you need.

But dont buy Buffalo, you made that mistake once, dont do it again. AND please please please dont say "well Ive had it for xxx years and its been great"

Always get the good stuff (Cisco/Linksys, Netgear, even ASUS) goin cheap is never a good idea when it comes to hardware.


sup with buffalo? I bought it because it natively supported dd-wrt.

#9 shockz

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 13:50

I dont know how you have your wifi setup, but you might be messing things up by throwing in an access point. (especially if you cant bridge it to your existing network)

You need to ask some of the network gurus in here - but snagging an older Linksys AP w/ DD-WRT or Tomato and "bridging" it will do what you need.

But dont buy Buffalo, you made that mistake once, dont do it again. AND please please please dont say "well Ive had it for xxx years and its been great"

Always get the good stuff (Cisco/Linksys, Netgear, even ASUS) goin cheap is never a good idea when it comes to hardware.


Netgear and good stuff don't belong in the same sentence. I speak from experience.

#10 sava700

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 13:51

Run you a length of Cat5 from you're router to a certain location closer to where you are and setup a access point.

http://www.newegg.co...nders-Repeaters

#11 Sarm

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 14:00

Does it have to be wireless at that end of the house?
Mains Lan would be a better option, that's what I use for my NAT and PC in the far corners of the house, faster & more secure than wireless of course.

#12 n_K

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 14:15

Netgear and good stuff don't belong in the same sentence. I speak from experience.

Netgear is good for what it's designed for; cheap stuff for the general mass market.
If you want something that's got a lot of power, very high reliability, or other specialist features then by all means get a different brand and spend 3 times the price for what isn't needed on all LANs.

#13 drtweak

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 14:24

Linksys better than Buffalo..... right. I have used every brand of routers over the years with many different set ups for many different clients and Buffalo are excellent routers, it's what I always use. For your problem, high gain antennaes are what you need. That is what I do when I need an extended range, always works.

:)

#14 remixedcat

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 15:08

Ddwrt,duct tape and pringles cans

#15 sc302

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 15:49

many new routers support a wireless extender mode which would do what you want, but you first need to find out where the wireless starts becoming weak. Personally I would just run a wire to the location where you want wireless to be strong and add a WAP or router with disabled dhcp and put a piece of tape over the internet port so retards don't use that port.