The direction Microsoft took with Windows 8   855 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you like the direction Microsoft took with Windows 8?

    • Yes I love it, i'll be upgrading
    • No I hate it, i'll stick with Windows 7
    • It doesn't bother me
    • I will use Windows 8 with a start menu hack program

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883 posts in this topic

I have some doubts about Windows 8. There are some things done poorly or just broke imo. However, I just want to say that I own three android tablets, all capable of running Windows 8, so please Microsoft, let me buy WinRT for them!

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I have some doubts about Windows 8. There are some things done poorly or just broke imo. However, I just want to say that I own three android tablets, all capable of running Windows 8, so please Microsoft, let me buy WinRT for them!

I don't think they can do that since ARM OSs are custom fit to the hardware.

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It is interesting to note that many of the RTM reviews are rather positive. Everyone acknowledges that it is definitely an incomplete 1.0 product, but taken as two disparate elements - general direction of Metro is being applauded as are the improvements to Desktop. It is no doubt that the Desktop in itself is a much greater leap forward from Windows 7 than Windows 7 was from Vista SP1. Some of the performance increases, particularly in multimedia areas, are sensational. I feel Microsoft has spent a lot of time obsessively fine tuning visual responsiveness, everything feels much faster in general usage as well, to the point of perfection. Others will surely increase further with time and drivers, such as gaming.

Perhaps the most positive review (not exactly a review) is by The Verge, arguably the most pro-Apple site on the internet. David Pierce, a long time Apple user, has decided to toss his iPad and MacBook Air out of the window and switch to a Windows 8 device. If you have read this guy's previous articles, that was pretty shocking to see. His thoughts are much more relevant to the general user as well.

Like every new ecosystem, it would probably be a few years before things start shaping up, but I have no doubt this is a great new direction that will change my computing experience, provided I am up for the change.

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The Verge, arguably the most pro-Apple site on the internet.

That actually made me really sad. I used to read WinRumors as my #1 news source before Neowin, but then Tom moved over to The Verge trying to breathe some life into their Microsoft-loving side :)

To hear that they're still pro-apple is a little disappointing.

but yeah, I do think a lot of people are going to be amazed with the new UI

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I don't think they can do that since ARM OSs are custom fit to the hardware.

I'm well aware of the limitations with fitting OS's to ARM hardware, thanks. It wasn't a serious wish, it was expressing a desire.

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It doesn't work that way. It's not like we show them a finished product and say "do you like that?" In fact, the opinions expressed are only part of the equation. The more interesting thing is how easy or hard it is for them to accomplish tasks without help.

Fair enough.

BTW, can you answer a question that's really bugging me?

WHY can't we specify an installation path for apps from the store? This is massively annoying. I do NOT want to clog my windows partition up with apps, and for people using an SSD (which aren't likely to be too huge), this is going to cause problems.

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I have a few complaints about Windows 8. I got the start screen looking pretty good with all my programs listed that I want. But when I log in as a new user, not a single program is listed on the start screen. Are users using the computer suppose to just know what is installed? Or are they suppose to go to the all apps screen and get flooded with 100+ programs all on one screen. Also noticed there is no log off button, only sleep, restart and shutdown. Maybe all this stuff can be set in group policy but these are huge problems in an enterprise environment. Also would be nice if there was list of recently used programs/documents on the start screen. Again maybe this can be turned on some how?

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Also noticed there is no log off button, only sleep, restart and shutdown.

Win + I, Power for shutdown options, click your name in the upper right hand corner of the Start Screen for log off & lock options.

Maybe all this stuff can be set in group policy but these are huge problems in an enterprise environment.

you do realize that the whole point (AFAIK) of group policy is to make it easy for an enterprise environment to customize windows? IT admins would have no problem changing group policy settings ;D

Also would be nice if there was list of recently used programs/documents on the start screen. Again maybe this can be turned on some how?

not that I know of although you can always open up explorer and then click "Recent Places" (or you could pin the link to your start screen by right-clicking it under "Favorites" in the left-hand column of an Explorer window and clicking "Pin to Start")

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you do realize that the whole point (AFAIK) of group policy is to make it easy for an enterprise environment to customize windows? IT admins would have no problem changing group policy settings ;D

I kinda mistype that, I meant Maybe all this stuff can be set in group policy but if not these are huge problems in an enterprise environment.

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I kinda mistype that, I meant Maybe all this stuff can be set in group policy but if not these are huge problems in an enterprise environment.

ah, that makes more sense ;D

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Like every new ecosystem, it would probably be a few years before things start shaping up, but I have no doubt this is a great new direction that will change my computing experience, provided I am up for the change.

Better not take years. 7 wasn't broken and competition is too fierce. MS better have this locomotive running full steam ahead in the first 180-days.

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It is no doubt that the Desktop in itself is a much greater leap forward from Windows 7 than Windows 7 was from Vista SP1.

Perhaps the most positive review (not exactly a review) is by The Verge, arguably the most pro-Apple site on the internet. David Pierce, a long time Apple user,

How is the Desktop a much greater leap forward again? Win7 added several functional changes, Win8 removed many of the ones from 7 and gave us what back in their stead? (Don't say 'performance') You'll have to forgive me if the stamp of approval from a Mac guy is supposed to reassure me. :x

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Choices are pretty lacking. I had to select "Hate it, sticking to Windows 7" even though I don't hate it, but I am sticking with 7 due to my disagreement with how well 8 is put together.

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I think win8 would be great on tablets and touch screens... And I mean, it's doable on a desktop/laptop... It's just kind of dinky. The start screen is kind of a novelty. Yes, you pretty much have to use it, unless you get start8 or whatever classic start menu apps there are out there, but you can do the majority of your day to day computing activities without leaving the "desktop app". Its a minor annoyance for us non-touch users, but its tolerable.

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So, I went back to WIN7 over the weekend...

The issues that bugged me the most in WIN8:

- having to always enable/disable the ethernet card or renew ipconfig to get the Internet access after logging in initially;

- experienced certain conflicts with the parallel environments and XONAR HDAV1.3 Deluxe;

- occasional jittery audio when listening to music and playing SC2.

The Start Screen didn't bother me and I didn't miss the Start Menu as I quickly learned the new shortcuts (I loved win+i, win+w, win+d)...which I'm going to miss, by the way, although there's no need for them at all in WIN7 as I can just click, click, click the old way).

Overall, I just didn't feel like waiting for the moment when WIN8 gets ironed out when there's already WIN7 that suits me wonderfully and comes free of the bloatware (the second parallel environment and integrated live ID services).

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I wasn't convinced with the start menu, metro apps and some UI choices. And I decided to give it a shot on the last few days and... Well, it's great! I still use desktop most of the time and the OS is really fast. I still think that metro apps should have a windowed option, but besides that, Windows 8 has been great for me. Surprised!

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I've used Windows 8 CP from Day 1 on 02/29, was at first impressed, but as time has gone by, I'm less impressed. Had to add Classic Shell to have a Start Menu, as well as my desktop isn't the best choice for it.

My normal OS is Windows 7 SP1, of which I have over $180 tied up in Anytime Upgrade Keys (from Home Premium to Pro) in those. It's a great OS, stable, & has served me well. I'm not going to give that up to get a $40 upgrade, speaking of which, there's a common misconception in regards to that. Many users feels that they're getting a dual boot for that price, & will be in for a rude awakening when they try to attempt to reinstall Win 7 from a backup, recovery partition or recovery disks.

The reason that this will happen? The SLP keys in the BIOS, the heart & soul of your OEM OS, will be permanently deactivated & removed, preventing any further attempts at reinstalling. Then, if one decides that they still need Win 7, an OEM one can be bought at Newegg for as little as $109 on promo.

In other words, if one likes Windows 7 & wants to keep it (even for later use), buy the System Builder edition of Windows 8 Pro, it'll also come with the Media Center.

As for me, I'll get my next version of Windows when I buy a new desktop, probably in 2015, after Windows 9 is released. I don't "hate" Windows 8, as I don't prefer to use that word, but I'm beginning not to like it. Plus, during this same time frame with Windows 7 RC, there was plenty of forum activity over the upcoming OS, I don't see as much enthuiasm with Windows 8 Pro + Media Center, even for $40. In the meantime, I'll buy an OEM copy of Windows 7 Pro SP1 myself, while available, as I may not like that version (Windows 9, assuming that's the name of it).

Is it really that bad, to have to virtually give it away? No recent version of Windows Pro has gone for less than $200, not even XP.

Cat

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Is it really that bad, to have to virtually give it away? No recent version of Windows Pro has gone for less than $200, not even XP.

I think it's a combination of Microsoft wanting to top Windows 7's deal, ($50 pre-order for Home Premium) wanting to reduce version confusion, (make it easy for everyone to get the pro version) and wanting to quickly create a large user base for the new app platform.

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i am for the most part happy with windows 8 however the start screen is a bit clumsy with mouse and keyboard and lack of a start menu is an a annoyance but its not to bad once set up your start screen how you like. The performance boost is nice and the desktop changes are nice aside from the removal of the start menu. I think things will go ok when windows 8 launches with programs like start8 and classic shell for power users and most OEMs likely will follow Samsungs route and include a start menu of their own or licence start8 to reduce confusion and frustration on non touch devices.

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Hello from a newbie (71 years old though)

I have been using each version of W8 since M/S first offered us the ability to download, and am presently using the RTM, waiting on Oct 26... I am almost forced into the upgrade, as my new PC has the AMD FX-8150 CPU, and W8 is a much more tuned to the CPU's architecture... I did install the latest "Classic Start Menu", which does give me a start button, and I chose to have my boot go directly to the desktop, showing the Metro Start for abouot 1 second... I am slowly getting used to the Metro (or Start) as M/S calls it...

Ray (the Old Marine)

Semper Fi

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Only in the legacy enterprise / OEM installer which hasn't changed at all for Win8. The installer that 99% of people see (i.e. people doing upgrades, or cleaning installing from an existing installation) is totally new for Win8.

I think he's talking about the UI for the Windows 8 installer uses Windows UI from 7, with the same chrome as 7. The only difference is that the background is purple.

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Well, I'm loving it and I'll get it when it launches. Thanks to the Enterprise Evaluation. :)

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yeah i think it's really great.. i'm already using it on mywork laptop..

tbh, i think there are perhaps too many clicks to do some things, but i won't let that bother me too much :)

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I've never had a problem with Windows 8 itself, though some apps don't work properly. That's to be expected though, and it's not Microsoft's fault. I don't see why people whine and cry so much about something as simple as a start menu. I myself have never used the start menu by clicking it and clicking on programs, and selecting the program I want. I press the Windows key, type the name of the app, and press enter. I can still do that in Windows 8, and it's much faster.

To all you whiners out there, please, PLEASE try to adapt to change, and not be so resistant to it. Just because you're used to a certain way of doing things doesn't mean it's necessarily the best way.

Cheers.

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