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#16 Ryoken

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 02:39

The law isn't uncommon, it exists in many countries..

That being said, it was a douche thing to do, given that their machine broke.. it's not like she came and got gas with the INTENT of doing it.


#17 sagum

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 03:12

What about everything being £*.99 what would we get for change?


In the UK, shops aren't legally required to give you any change either. You are supposed to give them exact money price shown. As such, its where a lot of people get confused when they think they can always get the item for said price if its mis labled cheaper.

If you want coins, there is always the bank.

#18 sagum

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 03:15

Thats the actual act's wording for anyone that is interested.

Subject to any provision made by proclamation under section 3 of this Act, coins of cupro-nickel, silver or bronze shall be legal tender as follows
(a)coins of cupro-nickel or silver of denominations of more than 10 pence, for payment of any amount not exceeding £10;
(b)coins of cupro-nickel or silver of denominations of not more than 10 pence, for payment of any amount not exceeding £5;
©coins of bronze, for payment of any amount not exceeding 20 pence


- http://www.legislati...k/ukpga/1971/24



#19 ir0nw0lf

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 03:26

My English English translator is on the fritz, what the heck does this mean:

was correct in refusing the payment after a row broke out.


Scuffle, tiff, fight, argument?

#20 mduren2445

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 03:34

There must have been an ATM or cash machine somewhere nearby ???? she could have used.

#21 Inklin

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 08:23

What about everything being £*.99 what would we get for change?


The Australians figured it out and have a system that works I think our *.99 method in the UK is stupid, it is just done to make the prices look cheaper, it makes people think they are getting some kind of bargain. sure the prices would be rounded to the nearest .5 but I don't see a problem with that at all. £99.99 is pretty much paying the same as £100.

There must have been an ATM or cash machine somewhere nearby ???? she could have used.


She couldn't use an ATM, the bank she is with had a huge failure and many people lost access to their accounts completely for several days.

#22 +Lovell

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 08:30

Coin Maximum usable as legal tender
£5 (post-1990 crown) unlimited
£2 unlimited
£1 unlimited
50p £10
25p (pre-1990 crown) £10
20p £10
10p £5
5p £5
2p 20p
1p 20p

#23 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 08:33

My English English translator is on the fritz, what the heck does this mean:

Scuffle, tiff, fight, argument?


All of the above, really. A row is just a synonym for a disagreement, same as all the others.

#24 C:Amie

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 09:25

To clarify this so that people don't think we're completely backwards over here (OK, perhaps we are).

It is not illegal to present 21p in 1p pieces; it is the right of the supplier to refuse to accept 21p in 1p pieces as legal tender for exchange of goods or services. The law states that anything classified as "legal tender" must be accepted by a receiving party in the settling of a debt. If the receiving party should refuse this without contract it is they who are at fault as the law states that you were offered repayment but refused to settle the debt on fair terms.

This statute simply means that if offered 21 1p pieces you are not obliged to accept it as legal tender.

If it were actually against the law, then the banks would have you escorted to a police van every time you tried to pay in your bagged up coinage :p

#25 BigGiantHead

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 09:33

While the garage staff could have been a little more accommodating since it wasn't her fault that her card was denied, their point of view was also understandable. It would take ages to count the coins.

Having said that, it was absurd that they asked her to leave her phone / driver's license / jewellery as collateral for £30. Would any of you do this?

#26 iKenndac

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 09:37

What about everything being £*.99 what would we get for change?


Here in Sweden they've abolished the minor denomination of cash entirely — the major is a "kronor", worth about 10p, making each minor (an öre) worth about 0.1p.

Prices still exist in the minor form, though. If you pay in cash it just gets rounded to the nearest kronor (so if the price comes to 21.31 you'll be charged 21, if it comes to 21.90 you'll be charged 22), but if you pay by card you get charged the correct amount.

In the UK they could round everything to the nearest 5p/10p and not cause the end of the world, although I'm sure the Daily Mail would be up in arms about it! :laugh:

#27 Riva

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 09:45

Stop giving so many 1p and 2p coins back then? if you have 10p change they will give you 5 2 2 1 and then they refuse to take it back. Everyone in the UK has a pile of copper coins its stupid!

#28 StevenNT

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 09:48

There must have been an ATM or cash machine somewhere nearby ???? she could have used.


At the time it happened RBS Banking Group (NatWest, Ulster and RBS Banks) had a system failure so might not have worked. That was the problem, the money is in the account but getting hold of it was the problem for most of that week and even the balance that would be displayed would have also been wrong. It was a total screw up at RBS Group that cuased to many problems. At least the women did return to pay for her fuel, but rather petty of the petrol station in my view and could have been processed on this occasion. But to me there was just so lazy.

#29 Stealthy_Singh

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 11:22

I never even knew this was a thing, I've handed over more than 21p in 1's before and never been questioned.


Probably because you were a nice and courteous customer. In my shop we used to accept it from our regular customers or if it was an exceptional circumstance. But if anyone was rude or not nice I would say 'You've got to be joking and send them on their way'!

#30 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 12:04

Having said that, it was absurd that they asked her to leave her phone / driver's license / jewellery as collateral for £30. Would any of you do this?

It's really not an unusual request. In fact sometimes a customer that couldn't pay would volunteer their driver's licence themselves to show good faith - it works both ways. If you're going to be coming straight back then it really doesn't matter. At the end of the day it is completely up to the individual whether they leave something for collateral and they are under no obligation to do so.

Probably because you were a nice and courteous customer. In my shop we used to accept it from our regular customers or if it was an exceptional circumstance. But if anyone was rude or not nice I would say 'You've got to be joking and send them on their way'!

Exactly. When I was manager of a busy store I took a similar position. I'd go out of my way to help anyone that was courteous or if they were a regular customer - I'd let them use vouchers that were expired and if they were short of money I'd trust them to come back with it later (it usually always worked out fine). But if somebody was rude and condescending then I would stick absolutely rigidly to rules / technicalities and refuse to let them off even a penny. It really doesn't take much effort to be polite.

I would have done exactly the same if some woman had threatened a colleague of mine and been openly hostile. If she'd have been polite, paid in the largest denominations available to her (by all accounts she deliberately did the opposite) and calmly explained the situation then it wouldn't have been an issue.