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Problem with RAW & JPEG Colours?


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#1 Joni_78

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 13:40

I have a problem with Canon EOS 600D, I didn't have this with EOS 1000D.

I have set the camera to save RAW + JPEG at maximum quality, camera colour space is set as default sRGB. Photoshop CS5 and Camera Raw are on default colour profile.

When I open the RAW with Camera Raw, colours look really dull, I don't touch anything just import it to PS and again I get really dull colours also in PS, I then open the JPEG and it's colours are correct. PS and ACR settings are default Adobe RGB (1998), it doesn't make any difference when setting those to sRGB.

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#2 Andre

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 14:53

JPEG from camera is processed according to the settings you preset in your camera.

RAW is not an image as for example JPEG or PNG. It is unprocessed data straight from the sensor. When you open it in Camera Raw or any other non-camera brand software, that software will interpret the data according to its settings. Hence the reason why RAW files might look flat, dull and usually underexposed compared to an in-camera processed JPEG. For example Nikon stores in-camera process setting inside the RAW files, which later can be read by Nikon Capture NX and produce the same photo as you would have if you shot just JPEG. Every other software ignores that stuff.

I suggest you read the manual for your camera and gather some general information on RAW files on the web to understand what RAW files are for, how to use them and what you can expect from.

#3 Argote

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 21:49

Those are just the default processing settings for RAW files from your camera on ACR. Maybe you can create a preset on import.

#4 vetsanctified

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 21:52

You also should take a look into your Photoshop default profile. Also (Just a suggestion) always shoot using Adobe RGB.

#5 OP Joni_78

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 04:54

JPEG from camera is processed according to the settings you preset in your camera.

RAW is not an image as for example JPEG or PNG. It is unprocessed data straight from the sensor. When you open it in Camera Raw or any other non-camera brand software, that software will interpret the data according to its settings. Hence the reason why RAW files might look flat, dull and usually underexposed compared to an in-camera processed JPEG. For example Nikon stores in-camera process setting inside the RAW files, which later can be read by Nikon Capture NX and produce the same photo as you would have if you shot just JPEG. Every other software ignores that stuff.

I suggest you read the manual for your camera and gather some general information on RAW files on the web to understand what RAW files are for, how to use them and what you can expect from.

I knew that, it's just that the difference is alot morew than on my previous DSLR's so I thought maybe there is something else too.

Those are just the default processing settings for RAW files from your camera on ACR. Maybe you can create a preset on import.

I'll try that :)

You also should take a look into your Photoshop default profile. Also (Just a suggestion) always shoot using Adobe RGB.

I thought sRGP would be the best to use when pictures are intented mostly for internet and computers? What about ProPhoto, I read somewhere that it would be the best for printing and web?

#6 Andre

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 07:55

If you shoot RAW, then it doesn't matter if you have sRGB or AdobeRGB selected. This setting only applies to in-camera processed JPEG.

If you save for web, general rule is to convert to sRGB while saving (although ideally you would only need to embed the colour profile you are working with and have the browser deal with the rest on the user's end). Not converting to sRGB while working in a wider colour profile can result in colour being deplayed incorrectly in different browsers on different monitors.

Printing is much more tricky and complicated than just simply saying ProPhoto RGB is better because it is the widest gamut. Some printers use colour profiles that easily fit inside the sRGB colour space. In that case having a wider gamut profiled image might make things worse as colours will get clipped during the conversion process and the end result will be different than intended. Although technology nowadays is smart enough to interpolate and correct for that, but nevertheless.

While sRGB usually works just fine for printing, it is a common practice to enquire your printer for the ICC profile. A good professional printer will always have colour profiles available for users to download and use to achieve the best results possible.