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Boost Wireless Signal With Ethernet Connection

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#16 manroweb

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Posted 11 July 2013 - 12:03

Thats ok. I was joking about the 1 year later, just made me laugh that its almost 1 year to the day this thread was last replied to.

 

By setting your Access point to outside the dhcp scope it means there is no risk of any other device being issued the same IP address and causing a conflict.

 

So long as you have router 192.168.x.1 and access point 192.168.x.2, with your dhcp scope being 192.168.x.100 > 200 then you should be fine.

Set the SSID to match your router, and same password and security (WEP/WPA/WPA2).

Also you may consider putting them on to different channels, but let's look at that once you are setup with the access point first.

 

There are devices which use the internal power lines of buildings to extend networks. These work in most situations, but personally I would not recommend them when you have CAT5 in place. That said you need the new access point to be in the area of weak signal to get the best effect from it.




#17 OP Sir Topham Hatt

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 11:59

Not sure if I mentioned this earlier but the modem/router I have from my ISP, I use as a router.

 

I have my desktop upstairs, while my HTPC is next to the modem/router in the living room.  I transfer files between the computers, so would need the new router to be an extender only.  Will probably get/buy all this stuff early next week.  I can put the modem/router into "modem only" mode, but then would surely struggle to transfer files to and from the PCs?

 

I've found a speedier version here for only a few pounds more too.



#18 spikey_richie

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Posted 12 July 2013 - 14:57

This thread inspired me to dig out my Sky Netgear V2 DG934G, and set it up as a wireless repeater. Also makes for a nice mini-switch under my desk.



#19 manroweb

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Posted 14 July 2013 - 18:32

Not sure if I mentioned this earlier but the modem/router I have from my ISP, I use as a router.

 

I have my desktop upstairs, while my HTPC is next to the modem/router in the living room.  I transfer files between the computers, so would need the new router to be an extender only.  Will probably get/buy all this stuff early next week.  I can put the modem/router into "modem only" mode, but then would surely struggle to transfer files to and from the PCs?

 

I've found a speedier version here for only a few pounds more too.

 

Your exisiting router is going to remain your router. You will not be changing any settings on it.

You can going to setup the new device as an access point, and disable its DHCP, so all requests goto your existing router.



#20 OP Sir Topham Hatt

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 16:34

So here's some info:

 

MAIN "Internet" ROUTER:

 

Wireless Channel: Auto

Active Channel: 6

 

SSID: HostController

Security: WPA2-PSK[AES]

WPS: Enabled (push button)

 

LAN IP Address: 192.168.0.1

DHCP - Enabled

IP Address: 192.168.0.2 - 192.168.0.11

 

 

 

NEW "Wireless" ROUTER:

 

WAN Host Name: Same as SSID.
LAN IP Address 192.168.1.2
 
Wireless Network Name (SSID):  Same as main router.
 
Wireless Security:  WPA/WPA2-Personal
 
DHCP Server:  Disabled
Start IP:  192.168.1.100
End IP:  192.168.1.199
 
Seems to be working for wired internet but wireless won't log on.  Do I need to set the DHCP server addresses the same as the main internet router, even though DHCP is off? No as the router tells me it's a bad IP pool (I guess it doesn't recognise those addresses as this router is on the 192.168.1.xxx range.
 

 

Other Questions:

 

1) Is it wise to have the username and password for the routers the same?  It's highly unlikely anyone would guess them anyway,so I don't see a problem.

2) I've read WPS isn't that great, so can I turn it off?  Visitors have entered the security key anyway.

3) WPA2-PSK... I have an "WPA/WPA2 Enterprise" option.  Is this better or is my current security sufficient?

 

 

 

Thanks



#21 manroweb

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 17:31

This is how it should be:-

 

MAIN "Internet" ROUTER:

 

Wireless Channel: Auto

Active Channel: 6

 

SSID: HostController

Security: WPA2-PSK[AES]

WPS: Enabled (push button)

 

LAN IP Address: 192.168.0.1

DHCP - Enabled

IP Address: 192.168.0.100 - 192.168.0.200

 

 

 

NEW "Wireless" ROUTER:

 

WAN Host Name: Same as SSID.
LAN IP Address 192.168.0.2
 
Wireless Network Name (SSID):  Same as main router.
 
Wireless Security:  WPA/WPA2-Personal
 
DHCP Server:  Disabled
Start IP:  192.168.1.100
End IP:  192.168.1.199

Other Questions:

 

1) Is it wise to have the username and password for the routers the same?  It's highly unlikely anyone would guess them anyway,so I don't see a problem.

I do not see any issue in doing this within your home environment

 

2) I've read WPS isn't that great, so can I turn it off?  Visitors have entered the security key anyway.

Disable it

 

3) WPA2-PSK... I have an "WPA/WPA2 Enterprise" option.  Is this better or is my current security sufficient?

Use the highest security option available. Make sure the security is the same on both router and access point to ensure wireless devices can hop between them with ease.



#22 OP Sir Topham Hatt

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 17:40

Hmm, changing the new wireless router to have an IP of 192.168.0.2 renders it disabled so when typing that into the address bar, my PC can't find it.

#23 manroweb

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 18:05

What ip address does your PC have?



#24 OP Sir Topham Hatt

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 18:27

Currently my IP is now 192.168.0.104

 

Maybe I couldn't connect to the new wireless router because the DHCP scope wasn't set to the same numbers as the old router?

DHCP is still off though.

 

Should I add a DHCP reservation for the new router on the old router using the MAC address?



#25 manroweb

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 20:24

DHCP should only be turned on on the 1st router.

 

Access point needs to have DHCP disabled. Once this is done, the scope does not matter as it is not issuing IP addresses.

 

You do not need to add a reservation for access point, as it is not within the DHCP range being issued out by the router.

Reservation are to ensure the router always gives the same address to a specific device.

 

On the access point ensure the DNS and gateway is set to 192.169.0.1.

 

 

 

If you connect via wireless through the router (stand next to it), do you get internet access?

If you connect via wireless through the access point (stand next to it), do you get internet access?

 

 

What is your access point? Make and model?



#26 OP Sir Topham Hatt

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 14:10



On the access point ensure the DNS and gateway is set to 192.169.0.1.

 

What is your access point? Make and model?

 

169?  Are you sure?

 

It's a TP-Link WR740N.

 

Here's what I have done so far (started again):

 

1: Change IP address of router to 192.168.0.2
2: Change SSID to "MyNetworkName"
3: Set Password for wireless, same as the main router
4: Turn DHCP off
5: Set main router IP address range to 192.168.0.100 - 192.168.0.199
 
That's it.  The main router isn't connected to the access point's WAN port yet.
 
Do I power everything off, connect it, then power on the routers, then the PC?


#27 +BudMan

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 15:03

You would NOT connect your router to your router your going to use as AP wan port, it would be one of the LAN ports on your router your going to use as AP.. So your connection would be from LAN to LAN.

 

You really don't need to set gateway or dns on your AP lan interface -- unless from the gui or the AP it needs to access the internet.  Your turning it into a AP, it most likely has no need to get off your local network.  And if you did want it to those setting would have to be on the LAN interface not the wan..  Your wan interface is not used, any settings on it would not be of any use.

 

And yes I would disable WPS, it has been compromised and is not secure.

 

As to using enterprise version of WPA or WPA2 -- Unless you have a Radius Server to auth against you would not be able to get that to work.  PSK or Personal mode is all you need in a home setup.  Just make sure your PSK is strong.  And yes if you want to easy bounce between AP and the routers wireless then all the wireless settings should be the same, you can run on a different channel if you want but the SSID and settings be wpa or wpa2 tkip/aes,etc.. should all match.



#28 manroweb

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Posted 26 July 2013 - 15:07

 

 

169?  Are you sure?

 

It's a TP-Link WR740N.

 

Here's what I have done so far (started again):

 

1: Change IP address of router to 192.168.0.2
2: Change SSID to "MyNetworkName"
3: Set Password for wireless, same as the main router
4: Turn DHCP off
5: Set main router IP address range to 192.168.0.100 - 192.168.0.199
 
That's it.  The main router isn't connected to the access point's WAN port yet.
 
Do I power everything off, connect it, then power on the routers, then the PC?

 

 

 

Sorry typo 192.168.0.1

Ok 740N I know well.

 

You need to connect one of main routers LAN port to a LAN port on the 740N.



#29 OP Sir Topham Hatt

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 06:51

So... this works then :p

 

Why wouldn't I attach the main router to the WAN port on the access point though?  I would have thought it would "see" the internet through the main router and work fine?

 

Would I then technically be able to attach another one to the access point?  Or would that have to be attached to the main router?

 

Thanks for helping me learn :)



#30 manroweb

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 07:34

The WAN port is not on the same interface as the LAN port, so then relies on the router to route traffic from LAN to WAN and vice versa.

You are not using this device in a routing mode, so it would not work.

 

You can add another access point to any LAN port on the router or LAN port on this access point.

 

With the TP Link 740N if you load DD-WRT firmware onto it, you can enable the WAN port as a LAN port, and then have 5 LAN ports rather than 4.

It also makes the access point alot more stable. I have this device with DD-WRT and it runs so much better than with stock firmware.

 

Glad you got it working :)