Jump to content



Photo

Working AR-15 Assault Rifle Made With a 3-D Printer

technology

  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#16 Gerowen

Gerowen

    Neowinian Senior

  • 3,462 posts
  • Joined: 28-August 05
  • Location: Hills of Kentucky
  • OS: Ubuntu Linux

Posted 01 August 2012 - 02:23

Didn't he only print the lower receiver? The barrel is still steel, I would guess that a metal projectile traveling at 3,000 feet per second would demolish a plastic barrel in one shot, or at least rip out all the rifling so successive rounds would just fly all over the paper. I've seen all plastic lower receivers, but the upper is still metal to allow for the bolt and stuff to slide back and forth.


#17 KingCracker

KingCracker

    I am your huckleberry.

  • 4,290 posts
  • Joined: 23-February 12
  • Location: Knoxville,TN

Posted 01 August 2012 - 02:26

PHEW... One whole characteristic... That makes it better.

Would you call a nascar a formula 1? Don't think so. So why would you want to call something what its not. By definition an AR-15 is not an assault rifle I don't care what you say, until you officially change what an assault rifle is an AR-15 is not one.

#18 roadwarrior

roadwarrior

    Mississippian by birth and by choice

  • 12,944 posts
  • Joined: 25-April 03
  • Location: Republic of Mississippi

Posted 01 August 2012 - 02:47

PHEW... One whole characteristic... That makes it better.

Well, that "one whole characteristic" is the main defining one of an assault rifle - being capable of full auto operation. Since it doesn't have that feature, the AR-15 is absolutely no different, functionally, than any other small caliber semi-auto hunting rifle. It is more compact (which is an advantage in thick woods) and has a wider range of available accessories, but it works in exactly the same way. There are plenty of hunting rifles with more powerful ammo and better range and accuracy than the AR-15.

Didn't he only print the lower receiver? The barrel is still steel, I would guess that a metal projectile traveling at 3,000 feet per second would demolish a plastic barrel in one shot, or at least rip out all the rifling so successive rounds would just fly all over the paper. I've seen all plastic lower receivers, but the upper is still metal to allow for the bolt and stuff to slide back and forth.

The interesting aspect though is the fact that, legally, the lower receiver is considered the firearm itself. You can register a lower receiver (since it is the part that has the serial number) and add or change any other parts you like without legally having a different firearm.

#19 vetDirtyLarry

DirtyLarry

    ®®\vers.12.vis.13.u.03.al\DL

  • 17,001 posts
  • Joined: 31-August 03
  • Location: dirty jersey
  • OS: Win 8 | OS X 10.8.5 | Android 4.2.3
  • Phone: LG G3

Posted 01 August 2012 - 02:51

I am asking this out of genuine curiosity, but I have always been under the impression that the difference between semi-automatic and full-automatic is relatively minor in the grand scheme of things. Is this not correct? I guess the easiest way to understand it is if you have a full clip, how long does it take to (accurately) expel that clip using semi vs full auto? Is it not a matter of mere seconds?

Also is it not relatively easy for someone who knows what they are doing to modify (specific firearms that let you) a semi into a full automatic? Or is that just the stuff of movies and legend?

I am very curious as to the answer to these questions. Does it really just come down to semantics of words? Or is there a huge difference as far as end result?

I get legally there is a difference. But is there a major difference lethally?

#20 roadwarrior

roadwarrior

    Mississippian by birth and by choice

  • 12,944 posts
  • Joined: 25-April 03
  • Location: Republic of Mississippi

Posted 01 August 2012 - 02:55

By the way, the link in the article for the site where he got the CNC model is wrong, here's the correct one: http://www.cncguns.com/downloads.html

#21 KingCracker

KingCracker

    I am your huckleberry.

  • 4,290 posts
  • Joined: 23-February 12
  • Location: Knoxville,TN

Posted 01 August 2012 - 02:55

I am asking this out of genuine curiosity, but I have always been under the impression that the difference between semi-automatic and full-automatic is relatively minor in the grand scheme of things. Is this not correct? I guess the easiest way to understand it is if you have a full clip, how long does it take to (accurately) expel that clip using semi vs full auto? Is it not a matter of mere seconds?

Also is it not relatively easy for someone who knows what they are doing to modify (specific firearms that let you) a semi into a full automatic? Or is that just the stuff of movies and legend?

I am very curious as to the answer to these questions. Does it really just come down to semantics of words? Or is there a huge difference as far as end result?

I get legally there is a difference. But is there a major difference lethally?

First they aren't called clips, they're called magazines. Secondly an ar-15 is just like any other semi auto the bullets will go out of the gun as fast as u can pull the trigger with your finger, just like any other gun. And modifying an AR-15 to make it full auto is mostly stuff of legend. I think it can be done but its harder than you think, plus its illegal. Full auto guns are not illegal. But it is illegal to manufacture full auto firearms.

#22 DocM

DocM

    Neowinian Senior

  • 17,809 posts
  • Joined: 31-July 10
  • Location: Michigan

Posted 01 August 2012 - 03:08

Never, since I'm pretty sure any printed parts with resin or plastics could not stay together (like, literally fly apart or crack) with the forces firing the weapon would create. :/ Please correct me if I'm wrong though...


There are now 3D printers that print metal one layer at a time, about 10+ microns thick, using either a laser or plasma beam to fuse each successive layer into a solid mass. It can not only do metals like aluminum but tough ones like titanium which are normlly a bear to work with. Good enough that GE, Airbus and others are planning on introducing aerospace parts that are 3D printed within 3+ years.

As for critical parts like the barrel, precision machining of the rifling is only necessary if the weapon will have to shoot 100 meters or more. Below that, and for close quarters weapons like a submachine gun (small machine gun that typically uses pistol ammo), you can go with a 'musket' design - an un-rifled barrel.

As for the rest of a weapon; the AK-47 design is among the simplest, allows for very loose tolerances, is highly reliable and was designed to be made using mostly stamped steel parts. Dump one in mud, sand or water, pull it out, give it a shake and it'll likely work fine, which is why a lot of hunters love the semi-auto version so much - especially those who hunt in swamps or other wet places like Louisiana or the rest of the South, or in sandy regions like out West.