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Yes. Its primary function was to create a sense of unity; To provide a common UX across devices.

 

While in the immediate time, I WILL concede and agree that it works either way. it does unify.. I'd only ask that you realize that while it unifies.. the base, the absolute base of the modern UI was meant for touchscreen use and then others of us who use mice.

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While in the immediate time, I WILL concede and agree that it works either way. it does unify.. I'd only ask that you realize that while it unifies.. the base, the absolute base of the modern UI was meant for touchscreen use and then others of us who use mice.

That's still not true at all. Metro was first conceived for PC use in Windows Media Center. It then evolved to fit on Microsoft's Zune, and Zune software, Windows Phone, and has since returned to the PC. If you fire up WMC, you'll see it's still there. The Metro Design Language is nothing more than a paradigm that seeks to break the "traditional" UI paradigms. It focuses on simple typography and graphics, rather than complex typographic and graphical UIs. It's an all around paradigm that can be used with a wide range of input methods, yes including touch, as opposed to the "traditional" desktop, which was designed around the mouse. The classic desktop will never satisfyingly accept other forms of input without big change - which is why it's taken a back seat as computers become increasingly mobile, and open to new forms of input. Like it or not, 10-20 years from now, mice interaction will be a silly notion to many.  

 

xp_mce2005_ur2_15.jpg

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As a long time Microsoft Windows fan this was the first time I gave up on it and went back to an earlier version (Win7). Still have 9 unused Windows 8/8.1 VL keys from my Action Pack subscription.

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That's still not true at all. Metro was first conceived for PC use in Windows Media Center. It then evolved to fit on Microsoft's Zune, and Zune software, Windows Phone, and has since returned to the PC. If you fire up WMC, you'll see it's still there. The Metro Design Language is nothing more than a paradigm that seeks to break the "traditional" UI paradigms. It focuses on simple typography and graphics, rather than complex typographic and graphical UIs. It's an all around paradigm that can be used with a wide range of input methods, yes including touch, as opposed to the "traditional" desktop, which was designed around the mouse. The classic desktop will never satisfyingly accept other forms of input without big change - which is why it's taken a back seat as computers become increasingly mobile, and open to new forms of input. Like it or not, 10-20 years from now, mice interaction will be a silly notion to many.  

 

xp_mce2005_ur2_15.jpg

 

 

 

 

Then I agree to disagree with you. besides.. what purpose does this discussion serve? I don't want my pride getting the better of me. So I'm simply leaving anything unsaid on the table and walking away. I see no further reason to debate a topic such as this. Elvis has left the building!

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Then I agree to disagree with you. besides.. what purpose does this discussion serve? I don't want my pride getting the better of me. So I'm simply leaving anything unsaid on the table and walking away. I see no further reason to debate a topic such as this. Elvis has left the building!

I'm simply pointing out that the ill conceived notion that Metro is meant for touch only devices simply isn't true. That's not its sole function. As long as people think this, they'll never truly understand why there's a big push for new and innovative UIs.   

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I'm simply pointing out that the ill conceived notion that Metro is meant for touch only devices simply isn't true. That's not its sole function. As long as people think this, they'll never truly understand why there's a big push for new and innovative UIs.   

 

Yes, it works for both, BUT it doesn't work equally well for both, Metro or Modern or whatever it's being called now, was designed to work best with touch screens. Again as I've pointed out earlier Metro was Microsofts attempt to "tablet-atize" the UI and if they would have left it for the tablet/phone nobody would care. Of course, they wouldn't have a vehicle to drive their users to the "store" right?

 

What's their new slogan - one experience across all devices? Do you use you phone, tablet, laptop or computer the same way? I sure don't, so why would I want the same experience? What about the desktop only user that has no desire to have a tablet or a Windows phone? Should they have to learn how to use Windows all over again, because Microsoft wants a piece of the tablet market?

 

Why wouldn't Microsoft simply ask the end user what they wanted at install? I would have been MUCH happier if they would have ask what I wanted, after all, am I not the customer?

 

As for your second sentance, what exactly has Metro brought to the UI, that Apple or Google hasn't already done with their Tablet UIs? I am truly curious, I have used iPads and Android tablets and am running CMMod on my Nook HD+, I also have installed Windows 8 Beta, Windows 8, and Windows 8.1, and have seen NOTHING new or innovative form Microsoft. Please, tell me something other than those annoying "live tiles" that drive me crazy until I turn them off.

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Yes, it works for both, BUT it doesn't work equally well for both, Metro or Modern or whatever it's being called now, was designed to work best with touch screens. Again as I've pointed out earlier Metro was Microsofts attempt to "tablet-atize" the UI and if they would have left it for the tablet/phone nobody would care. Of course, they wouldn't have a vehicle to drive their users to the "store" right?

 

What's their new slogan - one experience across all devices? Do you use you phone, tablet, laptop or computer the same way? I sure don't, so why would I want the same experience? What about the desktop only user that has no desire to have a tablet or a Windows phone? Should they have to learn how to use Windows all over again, because Microsoft wants a piece of the tablet market?

 

Why wouldn't Microsoft simply ask the end user what they wanted at install? I would have been MUCH happier if they would have ask what I wanted, after all, am I not the customer?

 

As for your second sentance, what exactly has Metro brought to the UI, that Apple or Google hasn't already done with their Tablet UIs? I am truly curious, I have used iPads and Android tablets and am running CMMod on my Nook HD+, I also have installed Windows 8 Beta, Windows 8, and Windows 8.1, and have seen NOTHING new or innovative form Microsoft. Please, tell me something other than those annoying "live tiles" that drive me crazy until I turn them off.

As I said above, Microsoft did not leverage PCs for tablets. That simply isn't true. They're unifying Windows devices. 

 

You don't have the option to choose because there's so many things wrong in allowing it. First of all, Windows isn't Linux. You've never had the option before to install/uninstall shells at will, so the same applies here. Second, you're the customer, but Microsoft never forced you to purchase the OS. It's not their duty to cater to every single user out there. They offer a product, and you choose to buy it or not. Second, numerous technicalities exist in supporting "options". Microsoft (or any developer, really) just doesn't have the time, energy, or resources available to support whatever bells and whistles you think you need. They have a pre-defined UX that they want to support, and nothing is going to change that. Change is part of the ride. Sooner or later, you know it's going to happen, so why complain about it? Companies can't afford to cater to a crowd looking to cling to a defunct era in computing. 

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As I said above, Microsoft did not leverage PCs for tablets. That simply isn't true. They're unifying Windows devices. 

 

You don't have the option to choose because there's so many things wrong in allowing it. First of all, Windows isn't Linux. You've never had the option before to install/uninstall shells at will, so the same applies here. Second, you're the customer, but Microsoft never forced you to purchase the OS. It's not their duty to cater to every single user out there. They offer a product, and you choose to buy it or not. Second, numerous technicalities exist in supporting "options". Microsoft (or any developer, really) just doesn't have the time, energy, or resources available to support whatever bells and whistles you think you need. They have a pre-defined UX that they want to support, and nothing is going to change that. Change is part of the ride. Sooner or later, you know it's going to happen, so why complain about it? Companies can't afford to cater to a crowd looking to cling to a defunct era in computing. 

 

I'm sorry I do NOT believe that if tablets weren't exploding the Metro UI would be touch driven or that Microsoft would have made such a drastic change to the UI. They got into the phone market late and lost millions of dollars, they got into the mp3 player market too late and lost millions, they got into the tablet market late and are still losing millions, they RUSHED Metro and screwed it up. They made some improvements with 8.1, they need to think long and hard about their customer base. Desktop users do NOT want Windows 8, every store the sells computer has a sign saying they still have computers with Windows 7 on them, what does that tell you?

 

Windows RT SHOULD have been the tablet and phone os only, the desktop should have been an improved Windows 7. Honestly, I think Microsoft knew with the way people clung to Windows XP, they figured they could slip Metro onto the desktop at a low desktp buying time and recieve as little backlash as possible while working out the bugs, as their desktop users stuck with Windows 7. It's a gamble that hasn't paid off, and it will hurt them, go to any web site for a store that sells computers and read the reviews, the biggest complaint is about Windows 8 and people hate it. These people aren't techies or power users they are regular users that don't like the UI, and they don't like it enough to post comments about it.

 

Why complain about it? Then how will they know it's NOT what I want or need? How will they know their customers are NOT happy with a "pre-defined UX" that doesn't work for desktop users? How would they realize the have many things to correct for desktop users to adopt their "Vision" of a "single experience across all devices"? How will Microsoft understand you can't have a great UI for many devices that aren't used in the same way? If Microsoft really believed in their "Vision" they would have removed the desktop completely, we desktop users are a "defunct era of computing" holding them back from the greatness of METRO, right?

 

I'm still waitng for the "new and innovative" things Metro brought to use desktop users...

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Desktop users do NOT want Windows 8, every store the sells computer has a sign saying they still have computers with Windows 7 on them, what does that tell you?

It tells me you're full of it as: 1) I've never seen signs like that. 2) Users have downgrade rights. Big deal, it's been like that forever. 3) Then how did my local Best Buy sell 3 Windows 8.1 laptops while I was in for a keyboard for my Surface just today?

 

Why complain about it? Then how will they know it's NOT what I want or need? How will they know their customers are NOT happy with a "pre-defined UX" that doesn't work for desktop users? How would they realize the have many things to correct for desktop users to adopt their "Vision" of a "single experience across all devices"? How will Microsoft understand you can't have a great UI for many devices that aren't used in the same way? If Microsoft really believed in their "Vision" they would have removed the desktop completely, we desktop users are a "defunct era of computing" holding them back from the greatness of METRO, right?

Windows has ALWAYS had a predefined UX. Users never asked for the Start Menu either, yet Microsoft forced it in Windows 95, much to the disdain of users. I'm not sure why all of a sudden you think things will change with Windows' development process. Again, it's not Linux. It's not designed to swap shells. This is nothing new. There's no rulebook saying desktop UIs need to have a Windows 95 look and feel to it. In fact, limiting desktops to that kind of UI limits their use. The UI was designed solely for a mouse, a technology which is slowly disappearing in favor of newer technologies. So no matter what, the UI is going to change to use these new input methods. There's no conspiracy here, simply normal evolution of PCs. Companies are finally adapting them to today's user base, the majority of whom want mobility. The majority of whom are ready to try new technologies without reservation. As a technology company Microsoft can only hold on to the old for so long until the strain becomes too much. Eventually, they have to push in a new direction to move forward.

 

Not sure why you think Metro on the desktop works the same as Metro on the phone. The desktop version of Metro allows more expandability in terms of multitasking and features. They look the same, but are quite different (yet similar) to use. If you can use one, you can easily use the other. That's the whole point of unifying the experience between devices. 

 

You're missing out on a fun adventure. Metro on the desktop isn't as bad as you make it out to be, and looks quite nice (and even complementary to modern designed offices and homes) on widescreen monitors.

 

post-420821-0-03812800-1385567190.png 

 

 

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- snip -

 

attachicon.gifScreenshot (1007).png

 

 

I'm eager to try those psychedelic Twitter & Fb apps.

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It tells me you're full of it as: 1) I've never seen signs like that. 2) Users have downgrade rights. Big deal, it's been like that forever. 3) Then how did my local Best Buy sell 3 Windows 8.1 laptops while I was in for a keyboard for my Surface just today?

 

Windows has ALWAYS had a predefined UX. Users never asked for the Start Menu either, yet Microsoft forced it in Windows 95, much to the disdain of users. I'm not sure why all of a sudden you think things will change with Windows' development process. Again, it's not Linux. It's not designed to swap shells. This is nothing new. There's no rulebook saying desktop UIs need to have a Windows 95 look and feel to it. In fact, limiting desktops to that kind of UI limits their use. The UI was designed solely for a mouse, a technology which is slowly disappearing in favor of newer technologies. So no matter what, the UI is going to change to use these new input methods. There's no conspiracy here, simply normal evolution of PCs. Companies are finally adapting them to today's user base, the majority of whom want mobility. The majority of whom are ready to try new technologies without reservation. As a technology company Microsoft can only hold on to the old for so long until the strain becomes too much. Eventually, they have to push in a new direction to move forward.

 

Not sure why you think Metro on the desktop works the same as Metro on the phone. The desktop version of Metro allows more expandability in terms of multitasking and features. They look the same, but are quite different (yet similar) to use. If you can use one, you can easily use the other. That's the whole point of unifying the experience between devices. 

 

You're missing out on a fun adventure. Metro on the desktop isn't as bad as you make it out to be, and looks quite nice (and even complementary to modern designed offices and homes) on widescreen monitors.

 

attachicon.gifScreenshot (1007).png

 

1) I was at two different Staples and an Office Max and they ALL had a sign posted in their computer display areas, I'll grab a picture the next time I'm in one. There is also a commercial for a computer store here in Tucson that expresly states they have Windows 7 on both desktops and laptops.

2) Yes, but I'm willing to wager the Windows 8 has been the most used, oh wait, they aren't putting Windows 8 Pro on many desktops are they?

3) And? If I needed a laptop/desktop, I'd go buy one and slap Windows 7 on as fast as the USB could load it! You think every buy around the holidays is buying for themselves?

 

Yes, they ALWAYS have, but they were really ever designing for the DESKTOP, something they are NOT doing now.

 

I've traveled that "fun adventure" 3 times and have gone back all three times, W8 RC/Beta, W8 and W8.1, the experience was a mess everytime. The sad thing? The 8.1 was the worst of them all, why? Microsoft has decided that video drivers are now "important" instead of "optional" and it decided to install the latest nVidia drivers, well they are a disaster for the 5/6 series cards. Then after I removed the "important" drivers for ones that work, Windows kept replacing them with the broken drivers until I turned off "auto install important updates" and had to chck for updates and then tell Windows not to install those drivers.. f'ing nice!

 

So I got the drivers sorted, then removed every tile with an ad... well, that left me the desktop and IE and few misc tiles I was never going to use, I don't like IE so that was gone, and I realized I might as well just boot to the desktop. Done. Tried to change the font - NOPE!, use a dark theme and be able to read the window tile - NOPE! Look, you have to give people some options, not everyone wants what Microsoft think is best. Windows 8/8.1 was a backward step for the desktop user who wants or needs a little bit of customization with resorting to reg hacks. The default font look terrible to me, I hate it and it should be trivial to change it, since 8 is built on 7 and they actually REMOVED it. WHY?

 

I'm glad people want mobility, good for them, is a desktop a mobile device? No. Is a non-touch screen laptop used like a mobile device? No. They had the soultion, Windows RT on the tablet and phone, but they wouldn't have been able to convince Office users to buy a device without Office. So, RT died a fast death when they realized Office Apps were going to be a ways off, can't get the enterprise market without - "a real keyboard and Office" to quote their commercials. They have to have the enterprise market to drive people to their store and they probably told the app designers they would be getting "all the desktop users as well" to convince people to take them seriously. You think the app designers would dump Apple or Android, without the promise of the entire Windows userbase? So agian, you gotta cram the store into the desktop, and you gotta have it where they can see it everytime they boot or push the Windows key. You sure as heck couldn't have it buried in the start menu...

 

I have a Nook HD+ running Android (CMMod 10.2) and it's beautiful and works great, but I sure wouldn't want to drive that with a mouse and I sure as heck don't want it on my desktop.

 

Look, we are just going to have to disagree, I only see Windows 8 as a last gasp stab at getting a real piece of the tablet market, and they hoped that the desktop users would be able to handle the crappy choices they made in their UI.

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