Jump to content



Photo

SSD Usage


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1 lawtai

lawtai

    Neowinian Old Timer

  • Joined: 06-October 01
  • Location: Rochester, NY

Posted 27 August 2012 - 01:02

So I recently built a new computer and bought the Samsung 830 128GB SSD drive, my first SSD. So far, I've installed Win7 and some widely used programs such as Office, Photoshop/Lightroom, and a game (League of Legends). I still have roughly 80GB left, as well as a separate 500GB HD.

Is there any reason why I couldn't just use my SSD as a normal HD and basically install everything on there, or store a bunch of stuff there? Other than photos, which I would plan on loading onto the 500GB HD, I don't really install much. Should I worry about the SSD dying sooner just from normal use?

I'll probably use this comp for 5 years or so, and just build another or buy another comp. Do I really need to worry about the SSD?


#2 jesseinsf

jesseinsf

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 04-October 05
  • Location: Reseda, CA
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Professional with Media Center 64 bit

Posted 27 August 2012 - 02:04

Sure you can. SSDs wear out from "Writes", not "Reads". Just Google search what services needs to be disabled (If they are not already). Most drives have a 3 year warranty, while a few have 10 year warranties. You can move your temp internet folder and account folders to the HDD. For account folders you click Start, then click the account name on the top left. Just make sure you create folders for each folder you are moving. But make sure you create the "My Documents" folder and put the Music, Pictures, Videos, Downloads and "Saved Games" folder inside the My Documents folder on the HDD. I don't use a PageFile because I have 12GB of memory (Though you may need it). You should have a Pagefile if you use curtain apps like Adobe's Products. I would also move the pagefile over to the HDD and make it small.

BTW, you should not fill "any" drive over 75% of it's capacity.

#3 Fahim S.

Fahim S.

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 2
  • Joined: 15-April 02
  • OS: Windows 8 - OG
  • Phone: Google Nexus 4 16GB by LG

Posted 27 August 2012 - 09:04

Sure you can. SSDs wear out from "Writes", not "Reads". Just Google search what services needs to be disabled (If they are not already). Most drives have a 3 year warranty, while a few have 10 year warranties. You can move your temp internet folder and account folders to the HDD. For account folders you click Start, then click the account name on the top left. Just make sure you create folders for each folder you are moving. But make sure you create the "My Documents" folder and put the Music, Pictures, Videos, Downloads and "Saved Games" folder inside the My Documents folder on the HDD. I don't use a PageFile because I have 12GB of memory (Though you may need it). You should have a Pagefile if you use curtain apps like Adobe's Products. I would also move the pagefile over to the HDD and make it small.

BTW, you should not fill "any" drive over 75% of it's capacity.


That's pretty much all FUD.
The only thing you need to do is make sure defragmentation is switched off - and Windows usually does that automatically for SSDs.
Otherwise, just use the SSD like any other drive.

#4 jesseinsf

jesseinsf

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 04-October 05
  • Location: Reseda, CA
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Professional with Media Center 64 bit

Posted 27 August 2012 - 09:18

That's pretty much all FUD.
The only thing you need to do is make sure defragmentation is switched off - and Windows usually does that automatically for SSDs.
Otherwise, just use the SSD like any other drive.

Hi Mr. FUD,
Now why would someone move their account folders to another drive? Hmmmm, maybe because it is like the best backup scheme that you can do. Plus you don't want to fill up Valuable 128GB disk space, plus it saves allot of unnecessary writes to disk. And yes, Writes do wear out any drive whether it's an SSD or HDD. And why would you turn off Defrag? Well you would probably say that it is because Defrag isn't needed, when in fact defrag does wear out a SSD faster than it does a HDD. And yes, Windows does turn off required services that they beleive can harm a SSD. But it is always a good thing to check to make sure the services are turned off by default.

#5 ShadowPHP

ShadowPHP

    php c0der

  • Joined: 12-May 05
  • Location: GREAT Britain

Posted 27 August 2012 - 09:28

Hi Mr. FUD,
Now why would someone move their account folders to another drive? Hmmmm, maybe because it is like the best backup scheme that you can do.

The best backup you can do is a backup.

Hi Mr. FUD,
Now why would someone move their account folders to another drive? Hmmmm, maybe because it is like the best backup scheme that you can do. Plus you don't want to fill up Valuable 128GB disk space, plus it saves allot of unnecessary writes to disk. And yes, Writes do wear out any drive whether it's an SSD or HDD. And why would you turn off Defrag? Well you would probably say that it is because Defrag isn't needed, when in fact defrag does wear out a SSD faster than it does a HDD. And yes, Windows does turn off required services that they beleive can harm a SSD. But it is always a good thing to check to make sure the services are turned off by default.

Windows 7 will optimize itself if an SSD is being used - http://blogs.msdn.co...drives-and.aspx
I'd suggest just leaving everything at default on the SSD - You'll replace the drive long before you wear it out.

#6 jesseinsf

jesseinsf

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 04-October 05
  • Location: Reseda, CA
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Professional with Media Center 64 bit

Posted 27 August 2012 - 09:46

The best backup you can do is a backup.


Windows 7 will optimize itself if an SSD is being used - http://blogs.msdn.co...drives-and.aspx
I'd suggest just leaving everything at default on the SSD - You'll replace the drive long before you wear it out.

I'm acting as if he is Savvy and you are acting as if he's dumb. And yes, I might seem to scare him a bit, but I'm just being truthful. Who knows, he may be a type of guy who gives his HDDs and SSDs a beating all day long. So my vision is basically a worst case senerio.
Also, I Beleive I said that Windows basically optimizes itself by turning off curtain services that cause allot of writes to the SSd. But it's good to make sure that what windows is suppose to turn off is off. When I started using a SSD; not all required services were turned off automatically until a year ago when there was an Intel Driver update for the controller.

#7 Fahim S.

Fahim S.

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 2
  • Joined: 15-April 02
  • OS: Windows 8 - OG
  • Phone: Google Nexus 4 16GB by LG

Posted 27 August 2012 - 10:02

I'm acting as if he is Savvy and you are acting as if he's dumb. And yes, I might seem to scare him a bit, but I'm just being truthful. Who knows, he may be a type of guy who gives his HDDs and SSDs a beating all day long. So my vision is basically a worst case senerio.
Also, I Beleive I said that Windows basically optimizes itself by turning off curtain services that cause allot of writes to the SSd. But it's good to make sure that what windows is suppose to turn off is off. When I started using a SSD; not all required services were turned off automatically until a year ago when there was an Intel Driver update for the controller.


Firstly, there is little evidence to suggest that your SSD won't outlive its usefulness - that is you will stop using it before it stops working. Defrag is pointless on an SSD because it is a random access mechanism (not a spinning platter like a traditional hard-drive where the location of data is important to the overall performance of the drive), and yes, switching it off does reduce wear - and that is the only thing that Windows does automatically (since Vista I might add), because it is the only necessary optimisation to make.

The let's think we can engineer windows brigade, also like to think they know better than Microsoft in the optimisation of the OS or the vendors of the SSD which have spent time developing wear leveling alogrithms, so try the following, all which is totally pointless:
1) Switch off the page file or move it to a spinning platter drive. I know, we'll take a file which is there to make Windows perform better and use its advanced memory management algorithms, a file accessed more than any other on the computer and tell the computer it does need it or move it to a slower piece of storage - because that will help with machine performance.

2) Swtich off super-prefetch. Again, we'll remove the cache that Windows automatically builds for itself to optimise its performance after adding a bit of hardware to optimise performance, therefore not gaining the best out of the hardware - taking a step back and two steps forward.

3) Move Temporary Internet Files and other such caches to a spinning platter therefore slowing access to them and reducing overall system performance - sounds like a great idea.

4) Make sure you only fill the disk to 75%. Never understood this one - so when I but a 128GB, I get a 118GB drive and I should only use 88.5GB of it? HELLO PEOPLE - SSD manufacturers have developed adavnced wear levelling algorithms to make sure your SSD wears down evenly - some even keep some of the flash to use when the normal stuff wears out. Stop thinking you know better.

Back when a 64GB SSD was expensive, I am sure there was a good reason to move some stuff onto a cheaper, more capacious type of storage but now SSD prices have tanked and 128/256GB SSDs can be had for (more) reasonable prices, there is no reason to really get the best performance out of your SSD and use it for all files on your computer without these stupid tweaks that actually do nothing.

#8 OP lawtai

lawtai

    Neowinian Old Timer

  • Joined: 06-October 01
  • Location: Rochester, NY

Posted 27 August 2012 - 12:22

I've done some of the things typically suggested, but for the most part have left everything as default. I did notice that disk defrag wasn't actually turned off, but I had TRIM enabled. Not sure why Win7 didn't detect everything for the SSD.

#9 vetneufuse

neufuse

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 16-February 04

Posted 27 August 2012 - 12:34

4) Make sure you only fill the disk to 75%. Never understood this one - so when I but a 128GB, I get a 118GB drive and I should only use 88.5GB of it? HELLO PEOPLE - SSD manufacturers have developed adavnced wear levelling algorithms to make sure your SSD wears down evenly - some even keep some of the flash to use when the normal stuff wears out. Stop thinking you know better.


Even now Samsung with the 830 line of drives makes suggestions like that... Even their samsung magician recomments you set aside 10% to 25% of their drive as over provisioning not in use space that it can swap blocks with if needed. Not saying its correct, but the SSD mfg themselves are pushing for that kind of idea.

#10 Shane Nokes

Shane Nokes

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 29-July 12

Posted 27 August 2012 - 12:44

Indeed, and Superfetch/Prefetch/Readyboost should also be automatically disabled by Windows if it's an SSD with adequate performance as it's actually faster. This is actually stated in documentation from MS.

#11 SuperKid

SuperKid

    Im no superman

  • Joined: 21-April 08
  • Location: Birmingham, England, UK
  • OS: OS X 10.8, iOS 7
  • Phone: iPhone 4S

Posted 27 August 2012 - 12:53

Just do what you should always do and backup your important data!

#12 protocol7

protocol7

    It's Fumbles. It was always Fumbles.

  • Joined: 06-May 09

Posted 27 August 2012 - 13:04

Indeed, and Superfetch/Prefetch/Readyboost should also be automatically disabled by Windows if it's an SSD with adequate performance as it's actually faster. This is actually stated in documentation from MS.


Interesting. I got my first SSD last week and did notice that Defrag was turned off for the two partitions I cloned to it. Now I just checked my Services and Superfetch is set to manual. And my Prefetch folder just contains the default few files.

In my case the only change I made when moving to the SSD was to disable file indexing. I never needed this. Pagefile and hibernation were already disabled.

#13 uus831

uus831

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 15-February 07

Posted 27 August 2012 - 13:09

I have an Intel SSD on my laptop (120GB) and i use it for everything (No other storage in my laptop). Is it safe to use it upto less than 1% free space left?
I use it for Visual Studio (a lot of temporary files) so the drive get hammered a lot.

Been using the drive for over a year. I have not disabled page file, because if the computer crashes, then there is no debug dump file.

By the way, there is no Intel SSD toolbox for Windows 8, and I'm planning to upgrade to W8 this weekend, do I need to install Intel SSD Toolbox (old version) or don't install at all?

#14 Shane Nokes

Shane Nokes

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 29-July 12

Posted 27 August 2012 - 13:13

Weird. The page & hibernation functions shouldn't have been affected. My system has both enabled (on 8 Pro here). Defrag was already disabled and actually set to do the TRIM functions automatically. Prefetch & Superfetch were off. I do leave file indexing on though since I have a ton of files & use search fairly often.

I have an Intel SSD on my laptop (120GB) and i use it for everything (No other storage in my laptop). Is it safe to use it upto less than 1% free space left?
I use it for Visual Studio (a lot of temporary files) so the drive get hammered a lot.

Been using the drive for over a year. I have not disabled page file, because if the computer crashes, then there is no debug dump file.

By the way, there is no Intel SSD toolbox for Windows 8, and I'm planning to upgrade to W8 this weekend, do I need to install Intel SSD Toolbox (old version) or don't install at all?

3.0.3 should work just fine. Just set it to Windows 7 Compatibility Mode before attempting the install if you're doing a fresh install, or you'll get a weird installer GUI error that will block install. Once you do that though it works just fine.

I wouldn't recommend using it all the way up to 1% free space. You want to leave some free space purely for error fallback.

#15 protocol7

protocol7

    It's Fumbles. It was always Fumbles.

  • Joined: 06-May 09

Posted 27 August 2012 - 14:00

I mean I'd already disabled the pagefile and hibernation before I got the SSD. I use neither of them here.