62 posts in this topic

You might find something to help you in here

http://www.dd-wrt.co...N_Configuration

You MUST use WPA2 authentication with AES encryption only, or use no security at all if you wish to achieve N rates. Anything else is against the N spec and typically results in the client falling back to G rates.

the screen shots i provided show that it is using WPA2.

as far as the channel im using 8 as that is the only channel that has clearance on both sides

post-36462-0-59152400-1346724415_thumb.j

i know how to setup a network dude. and its still not 300, no mater how you try to edge me begin wrong. its not

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the screen shots i provided show that it is using WPA2.

as far as the channel im using 8 as that is the only channel that has clearance on both sides

post-36462-0-59152400-1346724415_thumb.j

i know how to setup a network dude. and its still not 300, no mater how you try to edge me begin wrong. its not

Well I'm never going to change your mind, the simple fact is that you can connect at 300mbps on a 2.4GHz N band, and just because your particular hardware / setup won't allow it, doesn't change the fact that it is possible and not difficult at all.

I'm using CH1 with 20/40MHz dynamic and using Upper channel for the extension channel, nothing fancy, just plug n play

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300 is from the 5GHz not 2.4, 2.4 is 54/22 average

but almost all routers now have multiple antenna, so may be little higher,then the 22 average, but 300 is 5GHz only

This is completely false.

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Well I'm never going to change your mind, the simple fact is that you can connect at 300mbps on a 2.4GHz N band, and just because your particular hardware / setup won't allow it, doesn't change the fact that it is possible and not difficult at all.

I'm using CH1 with 20/40MHz dynamic and using Upper channel for the extension channel, nothing fancy, just plug n play

yes its a fluke with my hardware, your multiple year old router is out performing CISCO's ( the same company that does high end multiple thousands of dollar hardware for the top companies of the world ) top end less then 1 year old $200 router, 3 separate computers, 1 of which is less then a month old. literally you should sell your router to Cisco so they can catch up

post screens, if it is 300 then your router is doing stuff that no other router will do and is beyond the standard, but its Draft N which all Draft N routers varied before it N became Standard

so congrats, if it is 300 then your router is indeed a unique little snowflake

This is completely false.

i still have yet to see proof other wise, yet i have proved the contrary multiple times

i have no problem being wrong, i have a problem being told i am wrong with no proof what so ever

*Edit - from Cisco Itself, yes it does list the 300, but that is using the ENTIRE spectrum of the 2.4 band, effectively interfering with every single router around it, and not actually working to well from interference, as those are PERFECT Conditions

How Does 802.11n Provide Greater Throughput

Various techniques are employed in 802.11n to provide higher data rates and better coverage. This section details the techniques used.

MIMO: In the existing 802.11 a or 802.11 b/g technologies, transmission and reception of data streams usually happen using only one of the antennas. However, in 802.11n data streams can be transmitted and received over both the antennas. This results in a greater number of bits transmitted and received at a given point of time, effective usage of multipath signals which is usually a problem in indoor coverage. This leads to increased throughput and wider coverage. Table 1 shows the data rates of 802.11n currently supported by Cisco1. MCS 0-7 are the data rates achieved using single spatial stream (data bits).MCS 8-15 are the data rates achieved using 2 spatial streams, one over each antenna. Note that the data rates are doubled from 8-15. These data rates (0-15) are described as MCS rates throughout this document.

Note: 1Further higher data rates are planned for future deployments.

Channel Bonding: The amount of data that can be transmitted also depends on the width of the channel used in data transmission. By bonding or combining two or more channels together, more bandwidth is available for data transmission. In 2.4 and 5 GHz frequency band, each channel is approximately 20 MHz wide. In 802.11n, two adjacent channels, each of 20 MHz are bonded to get a total bandwidth of 40 MHz. This provides increased channel width to transmit more data. Cisco does not support channel bonding in 2.4 GHz frequency (802.11 b/g), because only three non-overlapping channels 1, 6 and 11 are available. However, the channel bonding has more relevance in 5 GHz frequency range where you have as many as 23 adjacent non-overlapping channels currently available. Channel bonding is supported only in 5 GHz, for example 802.11a. Table 2 shows the data rates achieved through channel bonding.

Frame Aggregation with A-MPDU: In 802.11, after transmission of every frame, an idle time called Interframe Spacing (IFS) is observed before transmitting the subsequent frame. In 802.11n, multiple packets of application data are aggregated into a single packet. This is called A-MPDU (Aggregated - MAC Protocol Data Unit). This reduces the number of IFS, which in turn provides more time for data transmission. In addition, clients operating in 802.11n send acknowledgement for block of packets instead of individual packet acknowledgement. This reduces the overhead involved in frame acknowledgements and increases the overall throughput.

Decreased Timers: In 802.11n, few timers have been reduced to decrease the idle time between individual frame transmissions.

  • Guard Interval (GI): In 802.11, data is transmitted as individual bits. A certain amount of time interval is observed before the next bit is transmitted. This is called Guard Interval. GI ensures that bit transmissions do not interfere with one another. As long as the echoes fall within this interval, they will not affect the receiver's ability to safely decode the actual data, as data is only interpreted outside the guard interval. By reducing this interval, data bits are transmitted in shorter intervals and provide for increased throughput.

Table 1 & 2


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Seems to work fine with my 2.4ghz tp-link router with channel width set to auto (and this router isn't draft n, its brand new). I get between 150-300mbps depending on where I am in the house, I don't have any other routers near me (rural area) and my cordless phones are 5.8ghz.

So saying its not possible on 2.4ghz is false. Not always plausible? Yes. But 5ghz isn't always plausible/ideal either. I previously had a dual band cisco router, and 5ghz was so horrible at penetrating through walls that I used 2.4ghz anyway because it gave me better range/performance, and this is a fairly new house with thin walls and no exotic materials.

post-159052-0-70874600-1346732496.png

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Seems to work fine with my 2.4ghz tp-link router with channel width set to auto (and this router isn't draft n, its brand new). I get between 150-300mbps depending on where I am in the house, I don't have any other routers near me (rural area) and my cordless phones are 5.8ghz.

So saying its not possible on 2.4ghz is false. Not always plausible? Yes. But 5ghz isn't always plausible/ideal either. I previously had a dual band cisco router, and 5ghz was so horrible at penetrating through walls that I used 2.4ghz anyway because it gave me better range/performance, and this is a fairly new house with thin walls and no exotic materials.

post-159052-0-70874600-1346732496.png

Well darn, your should sell your Stuff to CISCO, they cant do 2.4 300. You got some time warp router thats bends the laws of physics and beats CISCO's top of the line router.

What brand you got so i can tell CISCO they need to buy them and get out if the Dark Ages.

I still stand by my comments, and you didnt post your router config and just showing a 5GhZ connetion imo, but thats ok, when i get to work tommorow ill make some phone calls and find out one way or the other.

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Was just laying in bed trying to get to sleep due to heat

I think we are both wrong and right

Routers have multiple antenna in alot of cases, the reason you are seing 300 is from Dedicated Send and Receive broadcasting @144 the computer will combine the speed and give the 300 average. As it is indeed sending and receiving @300 combined, but thhe 2.4 is not actually the full 300 its each send and receive at the max 2.4 144/150.

Laptop aparently is a single antenna HP lists it as 1x1 im assuming thats antenna's it was pulling @56/54 with same settings, my desktop adapter is multiple antenna pulling 144 off same settings. Will find confermation when i get to work. But your right you seing 300 on 2.4 due to dedicated send and receives, and im right 2.4 will not do 300, the computer is combining them as one speed, its not 300@2.4 its a combined 2.4@150

Could just be its 5am heat still has me up and need to head to work in a few hours, going to hate tommorow

*edit - updated Laptop pulling 56 off the router where desktop pulls over twice that, even though its a N wifi in the laptop suposedly

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What brand you got so i can tell CISCO they need to buy them and get out if the Dark Ages.

I'm using a WAP4410N and can get 300Mbps, and this device is 2.4 only.

The EA4500 sucks on wireless. There's even reviews around stating that the older e4200 had better speeds.

I couldn't careless to be fair though, only WIFI used in this house is mobile devices, go wired gigabit of go home!

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Generally speaking you will only be able to get 300 Mbps using 2.4 GHz band if the access point and client have MIMO antennas and are using 40 MHz channel width (http://www.dd-wrt.co...N_Configuration).

However if you also allow 802.11g connections the access point will switch back to 20 MHz channel also reducing your speed to 144 Mbps as soon as a wireless G client connects.

Also look at link rates (http://en.wikipedia....2009#Data_rates)

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I'm using a WAP4410N and can get 300Mbps, and this device is 2.4 only.

The EA4500 sucks on wireless. There's even reviews around stating that the older e4200 had better speeds.

Strange, all the reviews i read said the oposite because its using an updated chipset, there is the E4200 and the E4200v2. The V2 is using the Marvel F6101 with 128 mem compared to the E4200 Broadcom with 64 mem.

The 4500 is using the Marvel F6101! Only reason i know that is i had to return a 4200 as i orderd a V2 and explaining their not the same router with a firmware update

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However if you also allow 802.11g connections the access point will switch back to 20 MHz channel also reducing your speed to 144 Mbps as soon as a wireless G client connects.

Also look at link rates (http://en.wikipedia....2009#Data_rates)

Ther isnt a single G device in the house other then the powerd off Printer, not to mention the router was set to N Only, same 144 speed. Posted pictures of that, 20/40 setting if the router didnt change the speed.

But see my previous post along lines of dedicated tran / rec giving a combined speed of each.

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Ther isnt a single G device in the house other then the powerd off Printer, not to mention the router was set to N Only, same 144 speed. Posted pictures of that, 20/40 setting if the router didnt change the speed.

But see my previous post along lines of dedicated tran / rec giving a combined speed of each.

I just reconfigured my Netgear WNR3500v2's to use 40 MHz channel width on the 2.4 GHz band; the only band supported by the hardware. And there you go; 300 Mbps. Cisco probably doesn't provide the 40 MHz options because it can cause compatibility issues / interference with other wireless networks.

7928794698_a75e423cf6_h.jpg

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*edit - screw it, belive what you want

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*edit - screw it, belive what you want

I believe wireless sucks full stop. :rofl:

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Totally against the current argument going on, but more along with the OP: A friend of mine and I connected our houses that were almost a mile apart with two Pringles can directional wireless antennas.

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In Tomato you can see at what wireless speed your devices are connected, but TX and RX separately. From there I can clearly see that my laptop is connected over a 81Mbps/300Mbps link (and that through two walls). 81Mbps is the speed from my laptop -> router, 300Mbps is router -> laptop. 2.4Ghz, 40Mhz-wide band. My actual speed is over 100Mbps but I can't test higher speeds since I'm using some old Fast Ethernet cables that won't do Gigabit.

So please don't say it's not possible. It's just easier in 5Ghz since there are much more channels available, using 40Mhz in 2.4Ghz basically blocks out 2/3'd of the whole band (which isn't an issue for me).

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yes its a fluke with my hardware, your multiple year old router is out performing CISCO's ( the same company that does high end multiple thousands of dollar hardware for the top companies of the world ) top end less then 1 year old $200 router, 3 separate computers, 1 of which is less then a month old. literally you should sell your router to Cisco so they can catch up

My router is a Cisco :s I already gave you the model number

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Well darn, your should sell your Stuff to CISCO, they cant do 2.4 300. You got some time warp router thats bends the laws of physics and beats CISCO's top of the line router.

What brand you got so i can tell CISCO they need to buy them and get out if the Dark Ages.

I still stand by my comments, and you didnt post your router config and just showing a 5GhZ connetion imo, but thats ok, when i get to work tommorow ill make some phone calls and find out one way or the other.

I already told you the brand in the post... and whats with the cisco rants? :/ As mentioned above it depends on your router/router firmware and how much 2.4ghz interference is in your home. It just happens that for some homes 2.4ghz interference isn't an issue, and for many it is. Wireless is a very hit or miss thing, very many variables. The fact is, 300mpbs over 2.4ghz is possible, but it depends on the above variables.

And my router is a TP-Link TL-WR941ND, which literally does NOT have 5ghz capability: http://www.amazon.co...ils_o00_s00_i00

post-159052-0-12588800-1346765784_thumb.

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I actually have a 30mbps connection and for business purpose, I'd want to upgrade to 60mbps. All my devices are connected to my Apple Airport Extreme dual band. Would I have to use N (5GHz) to reach my 60mbps or would need to be wired at that speed?

Right now, I am able to get 30mbps with my 2.4GHz as my 5GHz is disabled

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I actually have a 30mbps connection and for business purpose, I'd want to upgrade to 60mbps. All my devices are connected to my Apple Airport Extreme dual band. Would I have to use N (5GHz) to reach my 60mbps or would need to be wired at that speed?

Right now, I am able to get 30mbps with my 2.4GHz as my 5GHz is disabled

I'm assuming you're referring to your external WAN connection speed. In any case your 2.4 GHz WiFi connection should be sufficient when you're on wireless N if you have a connection speed of at least 65 Mbps to the access point / router.

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I'm assuming you're referring to your external WAN connection speed. In any case your 2.4 GHz WiFi connection should be sufficient when you're on wireless N if you have a connection speed of at least 65 Mbps to the access point / router.

I am talking about speed I am getting on internet. I was saying for business purpose and this is my home basement and no more than 3 users connected in same time! So nothing drastic.

So you are saying I can stay with 2.4GHz and could reach my 60mbps speed?

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I am talking about speed I am getting on internet. I was saying for business purpose and this is my home basement and no more than 3 users connected in same time! So nothing drastic.

So you are saying I can stay with 2.4GHz and could reach my 60mbps speed?

What's your connection speed to your router / access point right now? Also if all 3 of your wireless clients are connected, the wireless up-link bandwidth will be shared between them I think (some one correct me if I'm wrong). Your Internet speed will be as fast as your slowest link.

So for example if all 3 of your client devices are connected @ 65 Mbps to your access point and are trying to download at the same time, in theory the access point will load balance each to around 21 Mbps.

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All the computers are connected using wifi to the router. I know internet speed will be shared, this is the reason why I want to upgrade my line from 30 to 60 mbps.

I just want to know the way we will have to connect. RJ45, wifi 2.4 or wifi 5 ?

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All the computers are connected using wifi to the router. I know internet speed will be shared, this is the reason why I want to upgrade my line from 30 to 60 mbps.

I just want to know the way we will have to connect. RJ45, wifi 2.4 or wifi 5 ?

As I was trying to explain it depends. You should be good on wireless as long as you can get 65 Mbps. Check your link, I can only speculate.

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