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5 easy tricks to boost your home Wi-Fi

routers wireless-n parabolic antenna

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#16 Hell-In-A-Handbasket

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 00:41

All you need to do is this...



i started LoLing at the " riding on the Signal of other Networks "


#17 Detection

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 00:42

you can quote as much crap as you like, the fact that your not going to get close to 300 speeds on 2.4 due to interference, and the limitations of the 2.4 wireless spectrum

http://transition.fc...chtopics10.html

see where it says 2.4 is up to 144
the up to 600 is the 5GHz of N

talk to somebody OTHER then Best Buy, like a person worth their salt. your not going to get N speeds on the 2.4 band, there is just to much congestion, to much interference, and the bands are to small


bestbuy? quoting crap ?

What you getting your knickers in a twist for?

You stated that 2.4GHz Wireless N = 54/22

You stated that 300mbps was 5GHz only and not 2.4GHz

You are wrong, just accept it, no point in backtracking with interference and congestion, nobody was even talking about actual transfer speeds, just that 2.4GHz N does connect @ 300mbps

#18 Hell-In-A-Handbasket

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 00:58

bestbuy? quoting crap ?

What you getting your knickers in a twist for?

You stated that 2.4GHz Wireless N = 54/22

You stated that 300mbps was 5GHz only and not 2.4GHz

You are wrong, just accept it, no point in backtracking with interference and congestion, nobody was even talking about actual transfer speeds, just that 2.4GHz N does connect @ 300mbps


not backtracking, and you were debating the transfer speeds, your not going to connect @ 300mbps @ 2.4., your not goign to get close to 300 at 2.4

*Edit - to get higher then 54/22 you need multiple radio's which all N's have, that is how the N's broadcast faster then 54/22 on the 2.4 spectrum, unfortunately that is STILL not going to get you 300, or even close to it

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 01:04

not backtracking, and you were debating the transfer speeds, your not going to connect @ 300mbps @ 2.4., your not goign to get close to 300 at 2.4

*Edit - to get higher then 54/22 you need multiple radio's which all N's have, that is how the N's broadcast faster then 54/22 on the 2.4 spectrum, unfortunately that is STILL not going to get you 300, or even close to it


Ok, well we'll leave it in that you were talking about transfer speeds, and I was talking about connected @ speeds, I do connect @ 300mpbs on my 2.4GHz router

But even then, I have a cheap 150mbps USB wifi stick, one of those tiny stub things, it connects @ 150mbps on my 2.4GHz router and I can max out my full 76meg download speeds which is 8.9MB/s on a speedtest, so transfer speeds for just that stick alone are way higher than 54/22

#20 Hell-In-A-Handbasket

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 01:28

Ok, well we'll leave it in that you were talking about transfer speeds, and I was talking about connected @ speeds, I do connect @ 300mpbs on my 2.4GHz router

But even then, I have a cheap 150mbps USB wifi stick, one of those tiny stub things, it connects @ 150mbps on my 2.4GHz router and I can max out my full 76meg download speeds which is 8.9MB/s on a speedtest, so transfer speeds for just that stick alone are way higher than 54/22


then you are using the 5GHZ not the 2.4

had to reconfigure my router to SHOW you because you aparently dont know WTF your router is doing. its broadcasting 2 signals, a 2.4 and a 5GHZ under the same SSID and lucky your computer/router is smart enough to switch between whichever gives better speeds, known Multicast in some instances, other Duel Band, bla bla bla. its marketing speak

My Router, check cisco's site to see how OLD that router is.
router.jpg


this is operating on the 2.4 spectrum notice it is Under half of your 300 on BOTH instances
2.4Mixed.jpg 2.4N.jpg

now this is the bad part, because the 5GHZ has weaker range and it has to go through stairs, and utility closet ( Central Air Exchanger and Hot Water Heater ) the signal Sucks, same with the Speeds because of it.

BUT with only 2 bars i can get close to the same speed as a 4-5 Bar 2.4

5ghzn.jpg

*Edit - you are running on the 5GHz N part of your router, your router is more then likely broadcasting 2 networks of the same SSID and you are actually connecting on the 5GHz thinking its the 2.4

*Edit 2-

Ok, well we'll leave it in that you were talking about transfer speeds, and I was talking about connected @ speeds, I do connect @ 300mpbs on my 2.4GHz router


what, yoru not going to get higher Transfer speeds then your Connected speeds

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 01:31

then you are using the 5GHZ not the 2.4

had to reconfigure my router to SHOW you because you aparently dont know WTF your router is doing. its broadcasting 2 signals, a 2.4 and a 5GHZ under the same SSID and lucky your computer/router is smart enough to switch between whichever gives better speeds, known Multicast in some instances, other Duel Band, bla bla bla. its marketing speak

My Router, check cisco's site to see how OLD that router is.



this is operating on the 2.4 spectrum notice it is Under half of your 300 on BOTH instances


now this is the bad part, because the 5GHZ has weaker range and it has to go through stairs, and utility closet ( Central Air Exchanger and Hot Water Heater ) the signal Sucks, same with the Speeds because of it.

BUT with only 2 bars i can get close to the same speed as a 4-5 Bar 2.4


Geez, how many times do I have to say this, MY ROUTER IS ONLY 2.4GHz - WRT160NL if you really need to check, I think I know my router does not have 5GHz capability

Look at your channel width, 20Mhz only, Change that to 20/40MHz (ie channel bonding) and you`ll see that 2.4GHz is capable of 300mbps

#22 Hell-In-A-Handbasket

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 01:47

Geez, how many times do I have to say this, MY ROUTER IS ONLY 2.4GHz - WRT160NL if you really need to check, I think I know my router does not have 5GHz capability

Look at your channel width, 20Mhz only, Change that to 20/40MHz (ie channel bonding) and you`ll see that 2.4GHz is capable of 300mbps


just did, its the exact same 144

*Edit - i can only force the 40 only on the 5GHZ

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 01:48

just did, its the exact same 144

*Edit - i can only force the 40 only on the 5GHZ


Do your wireless clients support 40MHz ?

Both ends have to be capable


EDIT - I have my router set to "20/40MHz Dynamic" which works fine with 2.4GHz to give the 300mbps

#24 Hell-In-A-Handbasket

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 01:55

Do your wireless clients support 40MHz ?

Both ends have to be capable


in all intents and purposes it should if it supports the 5GHz N, but cant find any MHz listing for my adapter on desktop WUSB600N.

but i have multiple Laptops (MBP C2D from late 2006, and HP DV7-7012NR from a last month and all report the same thing )

*Edit - the only thing that would be against the adapter is i just found out its DraftN, not ratified N. the MBP i think may be draft, but the HP is Ratified

#25 Detection

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 01:59

in all intents and purposes it should if it supports the 5GHz N, but cant find any MHz listing for my adapter on desktop WUSB600N.

but i have multiple Laptops (MBP C2D from late 2006, and HP DV7-7012NR from a last month and all report the same thing )

*Edit - the only thing that would be against the adapter is i just found out its DraftN, not ratified N



You might find something to help you in here

http://www.dd-wrt.co...N_Configuration


You MUST use WPA2 authentication with AES encryption only, or use no security at all if you wish to achieve N rates. Anything else is against the N spec and typically results in the client falling back to G rates.

#26 Hell-In-A-Handbasket

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 02:07

You might find something to help you in here

http://www.dd-wrt.co...N_Configuration


You MUST use WPA2 authentication with AES encryption only, or use no security at all if you wish to achieve N rates. Anything else is against the N spec and typically results in the client falling back to G rates.


the screen shots i provided show that it is using WPA2.

as far as the channel im using 8 as that is the only channel that has clearance on both sides
meraki.jpg



i know how to setup a network dude. and its still not 300, no mater how you try to edge me begin wrong. its not

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 02:12

the screen shots i provided show that it is using WPA2.

as far as the channel im using 8 as that is the only channel that has clearance on both sides
meraki.jpg



i know how to setup a network dude. and its still not 300, no mater how you try to edge me begin wrong. its not


Well I'm never going to change your mind, the simple fact is that you can connect at 300mbps on a 2.4GHz N band, and just because your particular hardware / setup won't allow it, doesn't change the fact that it is possible and not difficult at all.

I'm using CH1 with 20/40MHz dynamic and using Upper channel for the extension channel, nothing fancy, just plug n play

#28 ViperAFK

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 02:25

300 is from the 5GHz not 2.4, 2.4 is 54/22 average

but almost all routers now have multiple antenna, so may be little higher,then the 22 average, but 300 is 5GHz only

This is completely false.

#29 Hell-In-A-Handbasket

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 02:33

Well I'm never going to change your mind, the simple fact is that you can connect at 300mbps on a 2.4GHz N band, and just because your particular hardware / setup won't allow it, doesn't change the fact that it is possible and not difficult at all.

I'm using CH1 with 20/40MHz dynamic and using Upper channel for the extension channel, nothing fancy, just plug n play


yes its a fluke with my hardware, your multiple year old router is out performing CISCO's ( the same company that does high end multiple thousands of dollar hardware for the top companies of the world ) top end less then 1 year old $200 router, 3 separate computers, 1 of which is less then a month old. literally you should sell your router to Cisco so they can catch up

post screens, if it is 300 then your router is doing stuff that no other router will do and is beyond the standard, but its Draft N which all Draft N routers varied before it N became Standard

so congrats, if it is 300 then your router is indeed a unique little snowflake

This is completely false.


i still have yet to see proof other wise, yet i have proved the contrary multiple times

i have no problem being wrong, i have a problem being told i am wrong with no proof what so ever


*Edit - from Cisco Itself, yes it does list the 300, but that is using the ENTIRE spectrum of the 2.4 band, effectively interfering with every single router around it, and not actually working to well from interference, as those are PERFECT Conditions


How Does 802.11n Provide Greater Throughput

Various techniques are employed in 802.11n to provide higher data rates and better coverage. This section details the techniques used.
MIMO: In the existing 802.11 a or 802.11 b/g technologies, transmission and reception of data streams usually happen using only one of the antennas. However, in 802.11n data streams can be transmitted and received over both the antennas. This results in a greater number of bits transmitted and received at a given point of time, effective usage of multipath signals which is usually a problem in indoor coverage. This leads to increased throughput and wider coverage. Table 1 shows the data rates of 802.11n currently supported by Cisco1. MCS 0-7 are the data rates achieved using single spatial stream (data bits).MCS 8-15 are the data rates achieved using 2 spatial streams, one over each antenna. Note that the data rates are doubled from 8-15. These data rates (0-15) are described as MCS rates throughout this document.
Note: 1Further higher data rates are planned for future deployments.
Channel Bonding: The amount of data that can be transmitted also depends on the width of the channel used in data transmission. By bonding or combining two or more channels together, more bandwidth is available for data transmission. In 2.4 and 5 GHz frequency band, each channel is approximately 20 MHz wide. In 802.11n, two adjacent channels, each of 20 MHz are bonded to get a total bandwidth of 40 MHz. This provides increased channel width to transmit more data. Cisco does not support channel bonding in 2.4 GHz frequency (802.11 b/g), because only three non-overlapping channels 1, 6 and 11 are available. However, the channel bonding has more relevance in 5 GHz frequency range where you have as many as 23 adjacent non-overlapping channels currently available. Channel bonding is supported only in 5 GHz, for example 802.11a. Table 2 shows the data rates achieved through channel bonding.
Frame Aggregation with A-MPDU: In 802.11, after transmission of every frame, an idle time called Interframe Spacing (IFS) is observed before transmitting the subsequent frame. In 802.11n, multiple packets of application data are aggregated into a single packet. This is called A-MPDU (Aggregated - MAC Protocol Data Unit). This reduces the number of IFS, which in turn provides more time for data transmission. In addition, clients operating in 802.11n send acknowledgement for block of packets instead of individual packet acknowledgement. This reduces the overhead involved in frame acknowledgements and increases the overall throughput.
Decreased Timers: In 802.11n, few timers have been reduced to decrease the idle time between individual frame transmissions.
  • Guard Interval (GI): In 802.11, data is transmitted as individual bits. A certain amount of time interval is observed before the next bit is transmitted. This is called Guard Interval. GI ensures that bit transmissions do not interfere with one another. As long as the echoes fall within this interval, they will not affect the receiver's ability to safely decode the actual data, as data is only interpreted outside the guard interval. By reducing this interval, data bits are transmitted in shorter intervals and provide for increased throughput.
Table 1 & 2


#30 ViperAFK

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 04:23

Seems to work fine with my 2.4ghz tp-link router with channel width set to auto (and this router isn't draft n, its brand new). I get between 150-300mbps depending on where I am in the house, I don't have any other routers near me (rural area) and my cordless phones are 5.8ghz.

So saying its not possible on 2.4ghz is false. Not always plausible? Yes. But 5ghz isn't always plausible/ideal either. I previously had a dual band cisco router, and 5ghz was so horrible at penetrating through walls that I used 2.4ghz anyway because it gave me better range/performance, and this is a fairly new house with thin walls and no exotic materials.

Screenshot from 2012-09-04 00:17:24.png