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Python 3.3 released, uses VS.NET 2010 C++ now!


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#1 torrentthief

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 14:19

http://python.org/download/

Now it uses C++ 2010 instead of 2008 which is a nice improvement.

Changelog:

Python 3.3 includes a range of improvements of the 3.x series, as well as easier porting between 2.x and 3.x. Major new features in the 3.3 release series are:
  • PEP 380, syntax for delegating to a subgenerator (yield from)
  • PEP 393, flexible string representation (doing away with the distinction between "wide" and "narrow" Unicode builds)
  • A C implementation of the "decimal" module, with up to 80x speedup for decimal-heavy applications
  • The import system (__import__) is based on importlib by default
  • The new "lzma" module with LZMA/XZ support
  • PEP 405, virtual environment support in core
  • PEP 420, namespace package support
  • PEP 3151, reworking the OS and IO exception hierarchy
  • PEP 3155, qualified name for classes and functions
  • PEP 409, suppressing exception context
  • PEP 414, explicit Unicode literals to help with porting
  • PEP 418, extended platform-independent clocks in the "time" module
  • PEP 412, a new key-sharing dictionary implementation that significantly saves memory for object-oriented code
  • The new "faulthandler" module that helps diagnosing crashes
  • The new "unittest.mock" module
  • The new "ipaddress" module
  • A "collections.ChainMap" class for linking mappings to a single unit
  • Wrappers for many more POSIX functions in the "os" and "signal" modules, as well as other useful functions such as "sendfile()"
  • Hash randomization, introduced in earlier bugfix releases, is now switched on by default



#2 togermano

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 14:21

Why not bloodshed?

#3 Mr Nom Nom's

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 14:30

Do you have a link explaining the advantages moving from VS Compiler 2008 to 2010?

#4 +virtorio

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 14:47

Why not bloodshed?

Are you talking about Dev C++? If so, it's not a compiler, and it's been dead for over well over 5 years at this point.

#5 togermano

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 14:57

Are you talking about Dev C++? If so, it's not a compiler, and it's been dead for over well over 5 years at this point.


this http://www.bloodshed.net/ It compiled fine for me.... what is it then

#6 +Brando212

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 15:02

this http://www.bloodshed.net/ It compiled fine for me.... what is it then

still hasn't been updated since 2005 :/

#7 togermano

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 15:14

still hasn't been updated since 2005 :/


That doesnt mean anything... C++ as a lang hasnt changed that much has it? just the API calls to windows that change....?

#8 ArialBlue

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 15:18

Wait aint 2005 before Vista came out? That's not good. Compiling w / consideration of newer CPU and Win Kernel changes leads to better code.

#9 togermano

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 15:21

Wait aint 2005 before Vista came out? That's not good. Compiling w / consideration of newer CPU and Win Kernel changes leads to better code.

2005 still worked with windows 2000 atleast though :\

#10 +Phouchg

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 15:56

Topic is kind of derailing. Anyway, Bloodshed uses mingw for the compiler. Even the latest mingw doesn't compile Python source from the get-go, but that must be where the most precious argument of open source comes in - insist on that by hacking the Python's source, hurr durr. Oh, the latest mingw does not support all the latest instructions, but chances are that neither does Python itself take advantage of them nor you're doing something so advanced as to benefit from them.

As for the piece of crap IDE - sadomasochism, free as in worthless. So there.

#11 togermano

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 16:05

Topic is kind of derailing. Anyway, Bloodshed uses mingw for the compiler. Even the latest mingw doesn't compile Python source from the get-go, but that must be where the most precious argument of open source comes in - insist on that by hacking the Python's source, hurr durr. Oh, the latest mingw does not support all the latest instructions, but chances are that neither does Python itself take advantage of them nor you're doing something so advanced as to benefit from them.

As for the piece of crap IDE - sadomasochism, free as in worthless. So there.


bloodshed is a piece of crap?

#12 +Phouchg

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 18:26

bloodshed is a piece of crap?

I believe I said so, yes. With complete confidence, no less.

#13 pickypg

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 18:55

That doesnt mean anything... C++ as a lang hasnt changed that much has it? just the API calls to windows that change....?

Take a look at the changes in C++11. Those changes will never be supported by the Dev C++ IDE, and therefore it will become a problem in the future. For example, the move constructor is like this:

ClassName(ClassName &&other);

That is going to cause you problems even when MinGW supports it, if it doesn't already.

#14 +Phouchg

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 20:17

I had to use Dev C++ for the whole C++ course back in college, because of free software policy. That was 5 years back and even then it was:

* old, unsupported
* its code insight - slow, unreliable and crash-prone
* its error log - compiler based, unhelpful at best, confusing, pointing at wrong lines/characters
* its usage of GDB - especially crash-prone
* its variable evaluation - outright wrong at times
* dead-end for businesses - had no RAD and project management features

Basically, it was a SynEdit wrapper with buttons to launch mingw compiler.

Switched to Code::Blocks soon. Or, as it happens, a wrapper of Scintilla on par with Notepad++. And no wonder, too - it's the actual DevC++ successor in many ways except crashing for no apparent reason. And supports VCPP, so the compiler argument, if it was actually relevant ever, becomes moot.

Oh, I now read there have been third-party updates to the wretched thing, namely wxDevC++. Which, however, happens to support VCPP, so again - compiler argument is moot.

#15 togermano

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 22:33

Thanks for explaining!