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Dinggus

TVis 120hz, but only shows 60hz

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Just bought a 55" LG 1080 120hz 3D TV and there's no option to switch it between 120hz or 60hz. I have Comcast cable and it plays 60hz. I have a HDMI cable that supports up to 240hz. How can I get 120hz?

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if your source is only 60hz whats it matter? Besides, I doubt you will notice any difference between the different hz levels.

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I thought 120Hz was for 3D mode only?

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Yeah your cable signal is just 1080i60 converted to 1080p30 by your box or tv. The tv will do the 120hz conversion internally, but for tv it won't matter. For movies it's better if it has a 24p mode.

120 only has purpose for 3d. And even then, 120 is not high enough to avoid crosstalk.

If you connected a computer to it, it might be able to talk to it in 120, but I kind of doubt it actually supports that as an input anyway.

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All my friends have TVs that shows and movies look like there moving fast, and I get annoyed at looking at it. They said it was 120hz, but my TV doesn't do that.

My TV does say 1080i60hz

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I have a 100Hz tv, but actually I don't I have a 60Hz tv that has Active Display - all it does is fake 100Hz by doubling the time each frame is displayed giving that cheap camcorder effect (nice for nature films)

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there is no true 120hz TVs, they are only doubled frame to produce a "120hz effect", Only a hand full of computer monitors can accept a 120hz source and produce a true 120hz image.

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Why does my TV read 60hz then? The people at BestBuy couldn't even give an answer. I think I'll just take it back.

Then what about 240hz?.

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All my friends have TVs that shows and movies look like there moving fast, and I get annoyed at looking at it. They said it was 120hz, but my TV doesn't do that.

My TV does say 1080i60hz

Oh god tell me about it it is absolutely horrible its a feature I turn RIGHT OFF when I get a new TV. The so-called "200Hz boost" makes it look like everything is on fast mode and "too real" its stupid!

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Are you subscribing for HD channels with Comcast ?

You don't say what brand and model the TV is.

I would check the manufacturer's website.

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I'm watching Homeland on ShowtimeHD right now and they look like their moving faster than other shows.

Are you subscribing for HD channels with Comcast ?

You don't say what brand and model the TV is.

I would check the manufacturer's website.

I get HD channels.

Model is: 55LM6700-UA

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Oh god tell me about it it is absolutely horrible its a feature I turn RIGHT OFF when I get a new TV. The so-called "200Hz boost" makes it look like everything is on fast mode and "too real" its stupid!

Indeed. I have an LG 47" 3DTV and the first thing I did was disable the TruMotion feature (the higher refresh rate) as it was incredibly annoying. It was so obvious it was on and I could always tell within seconds if it was enabled.

As for the OP, the higher refresh rates are emulated because TV isn't broadcast at 120Hz.

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TruMotion is what it is! So what's the point of these hertz?

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^ Higher hertz supposedly reacts faster to action.

I honestly never noticed any lag or blur with my ordinary 60 Hz HDTV.

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To sell TVs. They *can* be used to improve the quality with a good enough video processor, but it can also make it worse.

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I have a 100Hz tv, but actually I don't I have a 60Hz tv that has Active Display - all it does is fake 100Hz by doubling the time each frame is displayed giving that cheap camcorder effect (nice for nature films)

Not, it doesn't double the frames, that was a technique that only worked on scan line tv's, aka old fat tv's.digital screens actually need to create artificial intermediate frames by morphing or similar.

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TruMotion is what it is! So what's the point of these hertz?

eyes / brain can not process such a short time between frames, doubling them with 100Hz + technology means your brain / eye see each frame for long enough to process it

Something like that

Not, it doesn't double the frames, that was a technique that only worked on scan line tv's, aka old fat tv's.digital screens actually need to create artificial intermediate frames by morphing or similar.

That's what I had hoped, but when I read up on my LCD, that was the description of Active Display

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^ Higher hertz supposedly reacts faster to action.

I honestly never noticed any lag or blur with my ordinary 60 Hz HDTV.

No that's not it. That's the latency on the display, they are related in that high hertz screens needs low latency, but not directly so.

The reason for high herts screens is because tv sends at 25 or 30 fps. Movies are filmed at 24 this means that when movies are converted you get a weird jerky effects on camera panning(you only see it there because the whole picture moves, but it's there on everything), because these tv's are made to operate on50/60hz you gets the same effect on dvd's and blurays. To compensate for this. The tv's have 120hz,200hz, 400hz and even 800hz where they create the extra in between frames by "guessing" how they should look from the before and after frame. This smooths out the jerkyness.

On decent newish tv's and blurays you can avoid the whole issue by using 24p mode. Wich shows the native 24p movie directly from the bluray to the screen with no digital enhancement and computer generated extra frames that make all the cgi in the movie stand out.

That's what I had hoped, but when I read up on my LCD, that was the description of Active Display

Manuals dumb things down for regular people. Essentially doubling frames won't work on flat panels as there is no refresh. But it's an easy way to explain it to the regular people.

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Also no matter what tv you buy,it will always show 1080i60 as input as that's what's your cable/satellite box is feeding it. The tv then conveys it to a 1080p30(since apparently you box doesn't, might be a setting. It would probably do a better job of putting the frames together to a progressive image). Then it ads in the extra framed the image enhancement chip in the tv makes to create a 120hz picture.

The tv only displays the input signal though and won't show that it's actually showing 120hz(it's not anyway since a digital panels doesn't operate hat way. It just changes the pixels that need to be changes).

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So what feeds 120hz? Xbox?

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Nothing.

As I said, the TV probably can't input anything higher than 60 anyway. it'll just get 120 with the extra frames the built in image processor adds. the only exception is 3D in which case it MIGHT actually receive 120, in the form of two 60hz. though it's unlikely since a bluray would only feed it two 24fps pictures anyway, and even then depending on how the tv receives the signal the right and left image might be on the same frame. though that's unlikely today.

the 120hz is just marketign and is just what the built in image enchancement technology pumps out from the 24/25/30 original image fed into it.

The only thing that could potentially feed it 120hz, (IF the input actually supports it, which I doubt) is a computer.

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So what feeds 120hz? Xbox?

Something like 3DMark xx if you have enough PC power and vsync off would push as many Hz as your LCD can take (If your PC has the power)

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Something like 3DMark xx if you have enough PC power and vsync off would push as many Hz as your LCD can take (If your PC has the power)

what it actually pushes to the screen is still limited to the refresh rate you have set in the control panel. and the limit on the input on the screen itself. which is usually 60.

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what it actually pushes to the screen is still limited to the refresh rate you have set in the control panel. and the limit on the input on the screen itself. which is usually 60.

Yep true but for benchmarks disabling vsync is always recommended to break to 60fps barrier, in the driver control panel and BM

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