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We have a snapped off 3.5mm jack inside audio socket


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#1 +Byté

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:27

Hey Guys, bit of a nightmare situation here...

In the green audio socket on the back of my friends PC, he has accidentally yanked his headphones and snapped off the 3.5mm jack, so half of the 3.5mm jack is left in the socket!

Luckily he can use the front audio panel on his PC for the time being, but how would you guys approach getting this jack out of the socket? i was thinking of glue on the end of the broken 3.5mm jack and leaving it in there to set, then hopefully pulling the whole thing out, but if i use to much glue it could become wedged for good?

Any help would be grand,

Thank You :)


#2 Sandor

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:42

Glue would maybe work but like you say, too much and it might get wedged in for good...or even if you do get the other piece out, the socket itself might not work if there is any more glue left in it.

#3 capr

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:43

Glue is the best I can think of but yeah careful with using too much glue. I think it comes down to what type of glue you use. what you could do is use a bit of oil to fill in all around the piece and then wipe carefully and use glue. pick a glue that has a lower density than oil to make sure it doesn't go further into the jack.

cleaning the oil will be your next headache :( but since it's not conductive, it won't actually break anything if you don't get it all.


I think air pressure is also a good tool. do you have one of those two way pumps? a small enough shot class on top of the hole with a tiny hole to suck the air out would work.

#4 Hum

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:46

tweezers ?

If this is just a bank of output jacks, and not the sound card itself, it might be cheaper to just replace it.

#5 Lee G.

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:48

This happened to me earlier this year with the socket in the front audio panel on my PC.

I used a cotton bud and super glue. I cut one of the ends off of the cotton bud and put super glue on it. Then I put it in the socket, waited a little while, and it came out.

#6 thechronic

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:51

Difficult because of the grooves in the jack kind of lock it in place...this video MAY help. you'll have to pretend you can hear him lol



#7 Nothing Here

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:51

This happened to me earlier this year with the socket in the front audio panel on my PC.

I used a cotton bud and super glue. I cut one of the ends off of the cotton bud and put super glue on it. Then I put in the socket, waited a little while, and it came out.


That's how I did it before. Just don't use a lot.

#8 OP +Byté

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:56

Thanks for the info guys, looks like we will try and glue idea but just be very careful

#9 Nothing Here

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:58



Practice first!!

#10 Detection

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 15:58

Solder might be better than glue

#11 Ice_Blue

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 16:13

Get the smallest drill bit you can (1 mm or so).
Drill gently about 1/2 cm into the hollow middle of the broken plug.

Use a small screwdriver to thread a screw about halfway in.
Pull out the plug by holding the screw with needle-nose pliers.

This worked like a charm for me.

#12 .Neo

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 16:22

Solder might be better than glue

It also increases the chances of making matters worse. Not to mention the fact most people don't have a soldering kit at home.

I'd go along with the superglue idea as well.

#13 Detection

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 16:28

Not to mention the fact most people don't have a soldering kit at home.


I'd have thought most members here would have a soldering kit, I do.

#14 +Medfordite

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 16:29

Like others have said - glue would be my probable choice.

Although, a rather strong shop vac might work as well.

#15 Denis W.

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 22:26

I'd have thought most members here would have a soldering kit, I do.


Some of the cheap solder irons have finicky tips and can cause smudging of solder. Unless he's really careful about the amount of solder he's placing onto the rod he's using to pull out the plug, there's a risk he can spill solder onto the wall of the audio plug.

Plus, solder crystallizes pretty quickly, much much faster than glue. He'd have to be really quick after placing liquid solder onto a rod and sticking it to the plug before it cools down.