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Thieves Cracking Security Codes to Get Into Cars

illinois institute of technology keyless entry systems

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#16 +hedleigh

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 10:03

Yes they will. It is called cheating the system. Yes, they will ask you if it was locked, if the keys were in it, etc... But they don't know anything other than the answers you give them.
Perfect example, my old boss many years ago was starting to dislike his truck. When he took a trip to Atlanta, he left the vehicle running, on purpose, with the driver door open. Of course it got stolen, and thanks to his coverage, and the claim he made, it was covered.


There, fixed that for you.

That's one of the reasons that comprehensive insurance is so expensive.


#17 Javik

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 10:23

Can't beat an old fashioned lock!

#18 arachnoid

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 10:30

The techniques may have changed but the method is exactly the same.The thief is just making use of known by passes to either copy the key or pick the lock.

#19 Teebor

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 11:56

Personally I use Magnavolt

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In my 6000 SUX (Y)

#20 Enron

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 12:13

Personally I use Magnavolt

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In my 6000 SUX (Y)


And it won't even run down your battery!

#21 Praetor

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 12:54

just reminded this:


#22 SiCKX

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 13:00

Must be the videogames at fault.
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#23 n_K

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 13:03

This made... news?
It's common sense and isn't hard, it's called RF sniffing and has been done in practise for a VERY long time now.
Record what RF signals are around, go back later and replay them, oh look, car unlocks!111one

#24 Liquidfox

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 20:31

This made... news?
It's common sense and isn't hard, it's called RF sniffing and has been done in practise for a VERY long time now.
Record what RF signals are around, go back later and replay them, oh look, car unlocks!111one


That's the problem though, it's not that simple. At least with most EU manufacturers, the fob and immobiliser work on rolling codes. Every time you press the fob the code changes, this means you can't just simply replay a captured code.

#25 HSoft

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 20:40

That's the problem though, it's not that simple. At least with most EU manufacturers, the fob and immobiliser work on rolling codes. Every time you press the fob the code changes, this means you can't just simply replay a captured code.

Not quite sure I get this. It's a decent idea but...
I have 2 keys for my car. My wife has one and I have one. I press to unlock the car, the fob and the immobiliser change codes. Haven't I just made my spare key completely useless?
Maybe a hash based on time stamp or something but I think the above method is a little impractical.

#26 c.grz

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 20:46

Not quite sure I get this. It's a decent idea but...
I have 2 keys for my car. My wife has one and I have one. I press to unlock the car, the fob and the immobiliser change codes. Haven't I just made my spare key completely useless?
Maybe a hash based on time stamp or something but I think the above method is a little impractical.


The car knows you have two keys for your car. So it knows when you use one key or the other.

#27 arachnoid

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 20:47

It has a rolling window of codes for the registered key fobs,mind press it 100 times away from the car and it wil then be useless :D

#28 Brandon

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 21:11

It has a rolling window of codes for the registered key fobs,mind press it 100 times away from the car and it wil then be useless :D


Pretty sure it doesn't change until it gets confirmation from the car that the action has occured.

#29 Open Minded

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 21:17

Personally I use Magnavolt

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In my 6000 SUX (Y)


Lethal Response!



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