Jump to content

136 posts in this topic

Posted

[b]NEW YORK[/b] (AP)
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

One size never fits all. So is the case of Windows 8 ootb. You can try and get used to it, and perhaps you will even come to enjoy it, but they will be facing a backlash in consumer response because let's face it -- no one likes change when they are comfortable with the snappy Windows 7, and when the merits of said changes aren't readily apparent then they're going to bish about it and throw it out. I think Microsoft understands that and I admire them for trying something different. It'll just be a matter of time until people feel comfortable with it when it comes preinstalled, just like all the past radical changes. Though this is probably the most radical of all changes.
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

My question is... after people learn how to use it. Will they actually like it better on desktops?
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Well, it's a change, but we've known that for a while now. But this isn't Microsoft shooting themselves in the foot, that would be them if they didn't change to meet with the times.
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Yes, the non technophiles will get lost, on the Lego block-like Start Page. Exactly where Microsoft wants them to get lost ... duh. Newsflash - non-technophiles are already lost on their PCs, and drowning in shovelware on their desktop. All they do is web browse and email.
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='MorganX' timestamp='1350692279' post='595259277']
Yes, the non technophiles will get lost, on the Lego block-like Start Page. Exactly where Microsoft wants them to get lost ... duh. Newsflash - non-technophiles are already lost on their PCs, and drowning in shovelware on their desktop. [b]All they do is web browse and email.[/b]
[/quote]

People for whom Windows 8 and Windows RT cater for very well. I strongly believe that not only will the technically illiterate not be stumped by Windows 8 after 10-15 minutes of playing around, but the simplicity of getting to things like Mail, Web and Apps will actually give them a much better experience than on Windows 7.
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

"I have an 8 year old and they never got used to it"

Well good luck in life, when I was 8 I taught myself to use a Computer, Windows 98. If they can't deal with change at that age...
7 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote]"It was very difficult to get used to," he said. "I have an 8-year-old and a 10-year-old, and they never got used to it.[/quote]

These kids are stupid.
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote]I have an 8 year old that never got used to it[/quote]
when I was 8 my family had just gotten a Windows ME computer, it was my first Windows computer and I taught myself to use it just fine.
at the same time I had learned to use Mac OS 9(? 8? not completely sure) because that's what my school had

If kids today can't adjust and adapt to something as small of a change as Windows 8, then I fear for the next generation ... oh wait, I already do :/
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I can say that after using Windows 8 for a while it has started to grow on me. It was somewhat annoying initially because I didn't know how to navigate or fully use some of the new features. Like I didn't realize initially that I can start a search within any app that exposes it just about from the charm menu without actually first opening the app. That's a small thing that works very well, but I guess app developers need to start taking advantage of the new native functionality available to them in Windows 8.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

"[color=#282828]Tony Roos, an American missionary in Paris"[/color]
[color=#282828]Why are we supposed to care what this jackass has to say?[/color]
6 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Dear AP, Windows 8 does not run on smartphones. But I will give you credit for recognizing the Michael Mace dude formerly worked at Apple.
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

It will baffle Microsoft's profit.
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

It takes time to get used to, but so did Windows 95 and Windows XP and Windows Vista/ 7. The real question, as someone already alluded to, is whether people still like the operating system after they know how to use it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

To the guys screaming "get off my lawn", when you taught yourselves how to use a computer, did you have multiple PCs with different operating systems? Did you care what OS you we're running as long as you could play games, paint or use other entertainment based software? I know I didn't. Why would an average child give a rats ass about a new OS when he can do all the stuff he needs in the old OS without having to learn a new interface..
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='djpailo' timestamp='1350696615' post='595259377']
It takes time to get used to, but so did Windows 95 and Windows XP and Windows Vista/ 7. The real question, as someone already alluded to, is whether people still like the operating system after they know how to use it.
[/quote]

^ I liked 95, 98, and Windows XP immediately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Dev Preview through to the RTM version. I still don't like it.
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I have my copy ordered and a 128GB SSD to put it on. I would get it all setup now. But I just don't want to get everything installed and find the key I bought isn't compatible with the pro version I already installed. I don't see why it shouldn't be. I just hate reinstalling all my stuff more than I have to. So i'll wait until I get my key.

I just fear that after windows 8 is released all computer techs will be in for some extreme "Phone support rapeage". Most older people were confused from the switch from XP to 7, god help us all.

[quote name='Hum' timestamp='1350697528' post='595259401']
^ I liked 95, 98, and Windows XP immediately.
[/quote]

I liked, Windows 3.1, 95, 98, 2000, XP, Vista, 7 all immediately. Windows 8 is the first one i don't immediately like and not sure I ever will. Pressing a button and having something fill YOUR ENTIRE SCREEN is not good for productivity . I don't care what anyone says.
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

ha! 8 yrs old and my first was command line Unix!!!! take that!!!!!
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

The merging of the consumer and business lines of Windows was the biggest mistake ever. Just make one simple consumer/n00b-Windows, one advanced power user/pro/business user Windows. There would be no endless arguments, no hatred over dumbing down vs simplifying, no slitting of throats in forums. One size does not fit all. It's not about fear of change. I have already learnt all the new ways of Windows 8 but still hate the customization taken away. The editions called "Pro" and "Enterprise" are a joke. Even Windows 2000 has more customization than Windows 8 "Pro".
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='MsftGaurav' timestamp='1350746367' post='595260307']
The merging of the consumer and business lines of Windows was the biggest mistake ever. Just make one simple consumer/n00b-Windows, one advanced power user/pro/business user Windows. There would be no endless arguments, no hatred over dumbing down vs simplifying, no slitting of throats in forums. One size does not fit all. It's not about fear of change. I have already learnt all the new ways of Windows 8 but still hate the customization taken away. The editions called "Pro" and "Enterprise" are a joke. Even Windows 2000 has more customization than Windows 8 "Pro".
[/quote]

Mixing Win9x with WinNT (or more likely, the disappearance of the former) helped a lot to get stability, problem is, REMOVAL of customization options (which is like saying, we offer you a car but you will stay with your crappy audio with no auxiliary input) if customization options were available Win8 would have created the beginning of a new era for Microsoft... but they have chosen to fail.
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

^^ Who said about kernel? MS can very well create an NT-based consumer version (it planned one based on Windows 2000 in fact - Neptune). Today's equivalent can be considered Windows RT. But trying to replace Windows 7 with the uber-dumbed down Windows 8 is what infuriates users who need those customization options.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='KSib' timestamp='1350692169' post='595259271']
My question is... after people learn how to use it. Will they actually like it better on desktops?
[/quote]

No. The Metro experience is fine on a small, mobile device but totally falls apart when on a large monitor.

Can you imagine trying to use iPad apps on a 24 inch monitor?

What's worse is the Metro metaphor -- the charms bar. Load up the Wikipedia app. Where's the search field? You have to move the mouse to the right edge (assuming you aren't multimonitor) and gesture down to bring up the charms bar. Then select search. Every. Single. Time.
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

when I was 8, this is what computers looked like: [url="http://www.old-computers.com/museum/year.asp?st=1&y=1986"]http://www.old-computers.com/museum/year.asp?st=1&y=1986[/url]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='warwagon' timestamp='1350745809' post='595260283']
Pressing a button and having something fill YOUR ENTIRE SCREEN is not good for productivity . I don't care what anyone says.
[/quote]

I disagree. The live tiles on the screen really make the world of difference. It's not just some static launcher, it aggregates all the information useful to you in one spot, eliminating the need to go out and get it.

[quote name='Frogboy' timestamp='1350747814' post='595260341']
What's worse is the Metro metaphor -- the charms bar. Load up the Wikipedia app. Where's the search field? You have to move the mouse to the right edge (assuming you aren't multimonitor) and gesture down to bring up the charms bar. Then select search. Every. Single. Time.
[/quote]

I'm not sure what you are trying to say... What part of having multi-monitors prevents me from opening the search charm? And why is it a bad thing to have the search option in one spot for every app?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.