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Minecraft in Ubuntu 12.10


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#1 Mindovermaster

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 16:00

I am getting terrible lag when I am playing Minecraft. I get anywhere between 10-30fps. I used to get around 100fps in Windows 7.

I did everything in guides online and everything else.

The thread on how I got my 5770 working with Open Source drivers: http://www.neowin.ne...-upgradechange/

In my sig, click the RAM pic, I have this problem on my main system. All info there.

I am running OpenJava 6.


RAM is not my problem. I use 2048 set aside for java out of my 8GB. I run minecraft with:

java -Xmx2048M -Xms2048M -jar /home/david/.minecraft/minecraft.jar


I kept an eye on my System Monitor while running Minecraft, and my CPU, Memory, and Network never spiked unsuitability or anything.

When I first ran glxgears, I got 600fps. While running Minecraft, and running glxgears, I get 15fps. So is it that my graphic card does not have hardware acceleration enabled or something?


#2 +Brando212

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 16:09

install the Optifine mod?

also, see if you can update Java to 7, that should definitely help

#3 OP Mindovermaster

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 16:53

Oh yeah, forgot to mention, I am using optifine, and disabled a whole bunch of crap, to no avail.

I'll try Java 7. I'll get back to you on that.

#4 OP Mindovermaster

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 17:04

I installed and running Minecraft on Java 7. No difference from Java 6. Still get around 20fps..

#5 Max Norris

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 17:28

It's always possible it's the drivers. At least on the couple of ATI boards I've tried to use it with, the open source versions are incredibly slow compared to the Catalyst version. (I've given up with ATI and Linux, nVidia only for those systems now.) Great for the basic desktop composition but anything with significant 3D really suffers, totally forget about Wine. Pretty sure yours hasn't been filed under legacy yet so you're at least able to use them without downgrading X in 12.10.

#6 +Karl L.

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 17:40

How did you get Minecraft running with Java 7? Did you simply install it from the repository?

I only ask because of the problems I had getting Minecraft to run smoothly on my desktop (also with a Radeon HD 5770) under Debian Wheezy. Essentially, Ubuntu has inherited Debian's system for dealing with multiple version of packages, for example: Java. So if you 'sudo aptitude install openjdk-7-jre' from the repository, Ubuntu will still use OpenJDK 6 as its JRE because that is the default version.

Fortunately, you can rectify this problem fairly easily. First, run the following command to list all versions of Java installed on your system:
$ update-java-alternatives -l
java-1.6.0-openjdk-amd64 1061 /usr/lib/jvm/java-1.6.0-openjdk-amd64
java-1.7.0-openjdk-amd64 1051 /usr/lib/jvm/java-1.7.0-openjdk-amd64
Next, copy the name of the Java installation you want to set as default (from my example output it would be java-1.7.0-openjdk-amd64) and run the following command:
$ sudo update-java-alternatives -s java-1.7.0-openjdk-amd64
You can safely ignore the 'error: no alternatives for something-or-other.' messages that it outputs. That's normal. It just indicates that you don't have all the optional Java components/libraries installed from the repository.

That said, while I certainly experience much smoother game play with OpenJDK 7, I don't think that's actually your problem. While I'm not sure of the exact performance penalty that Unity inflicts on Minecraft, any compositing window manager will cause a drop in frame rate while in game (Unity 3D -- the default desktop environment in Ubuntu 12.04 and the only version of Unity in Ubuntu 12.10 -- uses Compiz as its window manager). If my theory from your previous thread was correct, you should get much better performance with another non-compositing window manager, such as openbox.

I experienced this same problem running Minecraft on my desktop under GNOME 3.4. However, any time I switched to openbox my frame rate in Minecraft went up dramatically. Since I really like GNOME 3 and don't want to log out then log back in using a different window manager each time I want to play a game, my solution is to start a second X session using the openbox window manager for playing games. (You can read a general overview of this method here.) That way, I can just press Ctrl+Alt+F8 to temporarily suspend my 'regular' session and switch to my 'gaming' session. To switch back I just need to press Ctrl+Alt+F7. Its simple and effective.

#7 OP Mindovermaster

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 17:59

I actually have:

java-1.6.0-openjdk-amd64 1061 /usr/lib/jvm/java-1.6.0-openjdk-amd64
java-1.7.0-openjdk-amd64 1071 /usr/lib/jvm/java-1.7.0-openjdk-amd64
java-7-oracle 1 /usr/lib/jvm/java-7-oracle


I'll try it in OpenBox, though. I'll get back to you.

#8 OP Mindovermaster

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 18:13

Oh gawd... Why didn't I think of that... I forgot that I added on Gnome Classic. Looks like Gnome 2 with no special graphics. I ran Minecraft. DAMN, I'm back to 120fps. :woot:

Yeah, using OpenJDK 7.

You sir, have yet been successful in helping me again. While I feel you do not answer my question fully, you do push me in the correct direction. :D

BTW, Max Norris, ATI rules!!! No pun intended. :p

Edit: Anyone having this problem, do not use Unity 3d while playing Minecraft. ;)

#9 Max Norris

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 18:20

BTW, Max Norris, ATI rules!!! No pun intended. :p

Heh no arguments there, I've just never had good results with them under *Nix, welllll dealing with Catalyst anyway. The open drivers behave just fine (mostly.. multiple monitors are still a bit twitchy), just leaves a lot to be desired for performance. Under Windows they fly, but for Linux I go with nVidias, just gives me a lot less headaches.

#10 +Karl L.

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 23:39

Heh no arguments there, I've just never had good results with them under *Nix, welllll dealing with Catalyst anyway. The open drivers behave just fine (mostly.. multiple monitors are still a bit twitchy), just leaves a lot to be desired for performance. Under Windows they fly, but for Linux I go with nVidias, just gives me a lot less headaches.


I agree with you if we are talking exclusively about closed-source drivers, but when it comes to open-source drivers, AMD's cards are far ahead of nVidia's. I have found the performance on my Radeon HD 5770 to be very good with Debian Wheezy (Linux 3.2); just make sure that you aren't running a compositor while in game and you should get descent frame rates (like I explained earlier in this thread). While I have great respect for the nouveau developers, especially considering the complete lack of support from nVidia, their driver leaves a lot to be desired. (For example, I would love to route audio over HDMI with my GT218, but I can't unless I use nVidia's proprietary driver.)

Its not that I am a zealot who refuses to use anything proprietary, like RMS, but I have grown tired of the constant ABI compatibility issues, long upgrade cycles, and general poor quality (mainly the performance and portability problems that their kludges for working around standardized, GPL components introduce) of closed-source graphics drivers from both nVidia and AMD. While the open-source drivers often lag behind their proprietary counterparts in introducing new features, and to some degree performance, they have much better support for older cards, performance consistently improves with each release, and, most importantly, they are very reliable.

In summary, I have nothing against proprietary graphics drivers in Linux, but I will never go back to using them because they have more disadvantages than advantages over their open-source counterparts, in my opinion.

Edit: I re-read my posts in this thread and the one the OP linked to, and I have come to the conclusion that I have no concept of the phrase 'short post'.

#11 OP Mindovermaster

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 03:07

Edit: I re-read my posts in this thread and the one the OP linked to, and I have come to the conclusion that I have no concept of the phrase 'short post'.


LOL. Man, you can say that so calmly? My, that made my night. And with a cold besides. :( Your "short posts" are quite helpful. Teaches me more about why you are doing it, rather than just saying, run this, run that. :)

And also, just a note more than a problem, I have been trying out different desktop environments, and I found something odd. I loaded up Gnome Shell (3.0) and tried running Minecraft in it. I get around the same fps as in Gnome Classic. So, is it just that Unity 3d is a GFX resource hog?

BTW, dual screens work great in Gnome Shell ;)

#12 +Karl L.

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 00:04

Its possible that the difference between the Unity and GNOME 3 is due to their use of different compositors.

Canonical decided to base Unity on the well-established Compiz window manager, which has the advantages of a good plugin API, a large collection of existing plugins, excellent supporting documentation, and a working compositor. The performance of Unity is tied to the Compiz engine and the plugins that Canonical decided to ship with it. This is not necessarily a bad thing as Compiz generally has good performance and Canonical has direct control of the new plugins they chose to write for many of the 3D effects found in Unity. Even the third party plugins that they chose to include by default are open-source and are very thoroughly tested. This approach has proven its worth as Canonical has been able to focus on improving their own Compiz plugins while letting the existing Compiz project developers handle the core. Performance has consistently improved with each new version of Unity despite the new and improved features introduced in each major revision.

The GNOME Project, however, chose a completely different route while planning improvements to their Metacity window manager found in GNOME 2. They wanted to add new effects to GNOME 3, which required a compositor, but they also wanted direct control of the window manager like they had with Metacity. Therefore, their solution was to write their own window manager to use as the basis of GNOME Shell. The result was Mutter: the compositing window manager powering GNOME Shell and supporting its plugin framework. Since it has a completely different code base than Compiz and doesn't have to be overly concerned with backwards compatibility or integrating with multiple desktop environments, Mutter tends to have very good performance for a compositing window manager. This approach is especially suited to GNOME since its narrow focus tends to lead to better integration and overall performance improvements. Of course, you will still get better performance in games by not running a compositing window manager.

#13 +Brando212

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 00:07

LOL. Man, you can say that so calmly? My, that made my night. And with a cold besides. :( Your "short posts" are quite helpful. Teaches me more about why you are doing it, rather than just saying, run this, run that. :)

And also, just a note more than a problem, I have been trying out different desktop environments, and I found something odd. I loaded up Gnome Shell (3.0) and tried running Minecraft in it. I get around the same fps as in Gnome Classic. So, is it just that Unity 3d is a GFX resource hog?

BTW, dual screens work great in Gnome Shell ;)

you hit the hammer on the nail. Unity is rather known for being a resource hog, it's one of the main reasons a lot of people don't like it

#14 OP Mindovermaster

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 01:37

@Xorange: So Unity is heavily dependant on Compiz, while Gnome is not?

@Brando: I actually like Unity, BUT I only play Minecraft. So switching between desktops will be a headache soon enough. I found Gnome Shell to be, a lot in some ways, like Unity. For example, the search option for apps, the app bar on the left, etc. And I rather like the "one app per page" look. Have Firefox on one, Terminal on another, and yet Pidgin on the other.

#15 +Karl L.

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 16:30

That is correct. They both achieve their 3D effects using compositing window managers, but Unity uses Compiz while GNOME uses its own.



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