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#121 CJEric

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 03:58

what the heck is a "tablet app"? If you're referring to Metro apps, they are not "tablet apps".

They're "OK for tablets, disappointing on desktops" (to quote Ars Technica reviewing the core apps in Windows 8). That's why you see them called "tablet apps".


#122 vetCalum

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 07:29

No, not at all.

Also, humans have this awesome thing called Peripheral vision you might want to read up on it. Because I and everyone else who knows how to use a desktop uses it every single day. So none of this "oh you can't focus on more than 1 thing at a time" crap.

edited to be "oh you can't focus on more than 1 thing at a time" crap

Using peripheral vision is not focussing; it's merely being aware of other things around the area you're focussing on. It's great for having a video playing while focussing on a web browser (for example), but it's not great for writing a Word document at the exact same time you're replying to a post on Neowin. You are still only able to focus on the one app—you still only have the one pair of hands, and the operating system still only allows you to type in one program at any one time. So, please tell me, why do you feel you need more than 2 apps on screen at any one time, considering all of that? You're not going to have more than one video playing at once, are you; you're not going to have music playing while you're watching a video, are you; you're not able, due to biology, to type in more than one app at the exact same time, are you?

#123 Rickkins

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 10:33

Do you have a source to back that up?


Turns out, I do...
http://www.theregist..._7_70_per_cent/

#124 ahhell

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 10:41

Turns out, I do...
http://www.theregist..._7_70_per_cent/

You're using The Register as a source? LOL
Why not the Daily Mail or the National Enquirer?
:rolleyes:

#125 x-byte

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 11:43

They're "OK for tablets, disappointing on desktops" (to quote Ars Technica reviewing the core apps in Windows 8). That's why you see them called "tablet apps".

Ars said that? How they have fallen.

You can call them what ever you'd like. They are still Metro-apps. They works perfectly fine on all platforms. Once the market starts taking advantage of them, we will see a ecosystem like no other.

#126 vetCalum

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 12:51

Turns out, I do...
http://www.theregist..._7_70_per_cent/

If some other outlets, other than just The Register (a terrible media outlet), pick up on this apparent story, I may give it some of my attention. Having said that, this apparent story means nothing regarding how Microsoft feel about Windows 8 and the future of Windows because very few businesses jump on the latest version of Windows. That has always been the case. Clearly, Microsoft understand that and they're focussing on trying to get people off of XP as soon as possible; the best way for them to do that is to try to influence the businesses to upgrade to the more mature Windows 7, as most of them wouldn't upgrade to Windows 8 so close to its release.

#127 Rickkins

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 13:20

If some other outlets, other than just The Register (a terrible media outlet), pick up on this apparent story, I may give it some of my attention.


Your attention is not required. Frankly, I don't give a toss one way or another.

#128 jakem1

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 13:26

Turns out, I do...
http://www.theregist..._7_70_per_cent/


I don't think that means what you think it means. It's perfecty sensible for Microsoft to encourage enterprises to continue upgrading to Windows 7 as it's a mature OS with a good reputation and many businesses will currently be working on upgrading to it from XP. Very few if any enterprises would be prepared to switch to Windows 8 at this stage and that has nothing to do with whether Windows 8 is good or bad, it's simply a reflection of the way corporations work. Microsoft know this and the only people who don't understand it seem to be the haters who struggle to adapt to the changes in Windows 8.

In any case, Microsoft have started the process of advertising Windows 8 to businesses as part of a longer term strategy.

http://www.microsoft.../windows-8.aspx

#129 Dot Matrix

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 13:50

You're using The Register as a source? LOL
Why not the Daily Mail or the National Enquirer?
:rolleyes:


I read the other day Bat Boy loves Windows 8. :laugh:

#130 ahhell

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 13:51

Your attention is not required. Frankly, I don't give a toss one way or another.

Sad panda. :(

Did he hit a nerve?

#131 threetonesun

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 13:52

I'm pretty sure Microsoft created Windows 8 with zero intentions of marketing it to businesses. I still have to use XP at work, and the turnover time for computers here gets longer and longer.

#132 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 13:56

Huh? So if I understand you correctly, apps shouldn't be allowed to be cross device?


Clearly that's not what I said. My point was that applications should be built for the platform they are running on and having an app that runs on desktop, tablet and phone can and does lead to compromises being made.

And what the heck is a "tablet app"? If you're referring to Metro apps, they are not "tablet apps". That **** has been debunked to death. I've been running Metro apps on my desktop without issue, in fact some have even replaced their desktop equivalents. Skype, Calendar, OneNote, EverNote, SkyDrive, Bing, Weather, Lync, Yellow Pages, Kindle, Wikipedia, etc. I could go on, but I won't. I run those AND more on my desktop. They work, and they work well.


By "tablet app" I don't mean all Metro apps, only those that are clearly not designed for desktop use. That includes Mail, Music, Video, Skype, Camera and Calendar - they all function on the desktop but are inferior to their desktop counterparts. There are plenty of Metro apps that are suited to the desktop environment, like XE.com, Cocktail Flow and Solitaire - they're still limited by the WinRT platform (can't resize them; rely on the Charm bar; right-click menus that appear away from the mouse) but they work well on the desktop. Some of the Metro apps you list are terrible on the desktop, like Skype, SkyDrive, Weather, Calendar, etc. I can't see why anyone in their right mind would choose to use the Metro version of Skype on a desktop system.

The limitations are all the more apparent to me because I have a 30" 2560x1600 display and heavily multi-task. The Metro versions of Chrome are simply unusable for me because they are terrible for any website that has a flexible layout (Blue's News and the Neowin forums are a good example of that), as it's very difficult to read text across the full width of the screen. Using a Metro app prevents me from doing other things, so they are only good to me for specifics purposes (playing Solitaire is one example).

#133 jakem1

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 14:50

Clearly that's not what I said. My point was that applications should be built for the platform they are running on and having an app that runs on desktop, tablet and phone can and does lead to compromises being made.



By "tablet app" I don't mean all Metro apps, only those that are clearly not designed for desktop use. That includes Mail, Music, Video, Skype, Camera and Calendar - they all function on the desktop but are inferior to their desktop counterparts. There are plenty of Metro apps that are suited to the desktop environment, like XE.com, Cocktail Flow and Solitaire - they're still limited by the WinRT platform (can't resize them; rely on the Charm bar; right-click menus that appear away from the mouse) but they work well on the desktop. Some of the Metro apps you list are terrible on the desktop, like Skype, SkyDrive, Weather, Calendar, etc. I can't see why anyone in their right mind would choose to use the Metro version of Skype on a desktop system.

The limitations are all the more apparent to me because I have a 30" 2560x1600 display and heavily multi-task. The Metro versions of Chrome are simply unusable for me because they are terrible for any website that has a flexible layout (Blue's News and the Neowin forums are a good example of that), as it's very difficult to read text across the full width of the screen. Using a Metro app prevents me from doing other things, so they are only good to me for specifics purposes (playing Solitaire is one example).


I really can't see what the big deal is. You have a large high resolution monitor so the Metro apps clearly aren't for you because you want to take advantage of all the screen real estate at your disposal. That's fine and you can continue running all your old desktop apps as you always have. However, basic users like my mother don't need or want or understand how to run multiple applications on their desktop so Metro apps will benefit her. For example, she refuses to use Outlook (even though she could clearly benefit from many of its features) because she finds it too complicated. She also struggles to understand that she can run multiple applications at once and tends to run everything full screen, opening and closing applications as she needs them. Fullscreen, simple Metro-style apps like Mail and Calendar will improve her computing experience immensely. Fortunately, Windows 8 caters for both your needs equally well by offering choices without limitations. You're both able to use similar hardware but in different ways that suit your needs.

Your arguments related to cross-platform development don't make much sense either. Clearly WinRT won't be used for desktop apps but for everything else it's a win-win for developers. Using the same (or close to the same) code set developers can target phones, tablets and PCs in one hit which means faster development, fewer bugs and more time to focus on features. It's not going to replace all development but for anyone interested in development of Metro apps it's a huge positive.

#134 CJEric

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 17:07

Ars said that? How they have fallen.

You think so? I feel like they have a pretty high-quality series of articles on Win8/RT going right now. I especially enjoyed the one about WinRT that Peter Bright wrote.

#135 Dashel

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 17:57

it's very difficult to read text across the full width of the screen.


QFT

That was good article from Ars too.