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New 10 core / 20 threaded IvyBridge for 2011?

ivy bridge socket 2011 socket r 10-core 10 core

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#1 sathenzar

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 16:17

I was recently thinking about buying a computer in the near future opting for the haswell when it came out. However I'm seeing a bunch of reports that for the 2011 socket there will be a 10 core / 20 threaded cpu. Sources:
http://www.techpower...ple-Tested.html
http://www.engadget....e5-2600-v2-cpu/

If this is true and it is coming out at the end of 2013, I'd almost want to wait to get that. What do you guys think? Also do you think nvidia will still not officially support socket 2011 as pci 3.0 compatible?


#2 Daedroth

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 16:21

4 cores or more are barely supported by applications at the moment, so what's the point in getting hyped about more?

#3 wv@gt

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 16:27

As the above poster said 4 are barely supported now, Im assuming more later on if you want to future proof your self. Also are you really doing anything that would require 10 cores right now?

#4 LaP

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 16:32

4 cores or more are barely supported by applications at the moment, so what's the point in getting hyped about more?


One day or another apps will have to support multi threading better. Cause this is where the cpus are going. There's a limit of what you can do clock wise with air cooling.

With 2 core there's was not that much pressure cause it did not make that much of a difference. But with 10 core games and productivity apps will shot themselves in the foot by not properly supporting it.

I would say in 5 years you'll see better support for 4+ cores if both Intel and AMD start to produce 10 cores processors..

#5 Manarift

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 16:32

10 cores 20 threads are mostly ment for server grade applications like VPS hosting etc or allot of graphic and video production. So my hunch is it will be server grade and not consumer grade

#6 fehu

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 16:34

It's a 3d rendering dream

#7 +SOOPRcow

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 16:42

4 cores or more are barely supported by applications at the moment, so what's the point in getting hyped about more?


That just isn't true. Just look in your task manager right now and look at the thread count. Now sure, a vast majority of them will never be using 100% of any physical/logical core but the point is that it will have to do less multiplexing and stuff will be much more responsive. There is much more to having more cores then just having more power. Just like there is more to x64 CPU's then being able to have more ram.

#8 MorganX

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 16:53

That just isn't true. Just look in your task manager right now and look at the thread count. Now sure, a vast majority of them will never be using 100% of any physical/logical core but the point is that it will have to do less multiplexing and stuff will be much more responsive. There is much more to having more cores then just having more power. Just like there is more to x64 CPU's then being able to have more ram.

Agree on x64 being more than just additional RAM. Cores, the OS supports multiple cores, but apps, they generally don't and could benefit. It's just hard, time consuming, and expensive to do. When the apps run well enough without it, profit says no need. Will remain for Servers, large DBs will love it.

#9 Daedroth

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 16:59

That just isn't true. Just look in your task manager right now and look at the thread count. Now sure, a vast majority of them will never be using 100% of any physical/logical core but the point is that it will have to do less multiplexing and stuff will be much more responsive. There is much more to having more cores then just having more power. Just like there is more to x64 CPU's then being able to have more ram.

Yeah, but that's just Windows seeing it. However a lot of applications aren't designed to utilise all of those cores.

#10 hjf288

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 17:03

Not everyone uses Windows.... :p

A dual socket version would be great for a server :)

#11 OP sathenzar

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 17:05

It is not so much that I NEED it. It's more of, hey this computer is a great investment it can do anything I need it to do and it will be overkill until the day it dies would be my guess.

To add to that I develop software, play games, run virtual servers and virtual desktops on my computer. Also I render video.

#12 f0rk_b0mb

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 17:06

I'd just upgrade your rig now. You don't need 10 cores unless your using your machine as a server.

#13 Javik

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 17:07

The argument that applications aren't multi threaded just doesn't fly any more, most are. In reality though it depends on what you use it for, if you do a lot of rendering and video transcoding you'll benefit from the extra cores but a modern quad will be enough for gaming.

#14 MorganX

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Posted 04 November 2012 - 17:18

The argument that applications aren't multi threaded just doesn't fly any more, most are. In reality though it depends on what you use it for, if you do a lot of rendering and video transcoding you'll benefit from the extra cores but a modern quad will be enough for gaming.

Now you just made it more complicated. Being multithreaded and supporting multiple cores are not the same thing. Also, I don't believe most games or apps support multiple cores or are even multithreaded. A small piece like printing might be. Servers, DBs, Flight Sims, a few games, Rendering apps, high end graphic design apps (even all of Adobe Creative suite isn't), but the most important, Photoshop is.