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Can't adjust to windows 8

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#136 Dashel

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 22:39

While true, you missed the point. Compare the Surface and the Lumia, I can do more with my Surface because the hardware is more capable than my Lumia. An upscaled WP OS would be wasted on it.


That still doesn't make much sense considering your other arguments. The whole point of the 'slate/smartphone' revolution, and WP in particular, was that it isn't about hardware specs anymore, but the more Apple like, simple use harmony of a gadget. RT/WP aren't on fast hardware, but because of the 'limited' needs of WP/RT apps themselves, it's quite responsive
. Fast and fluid even. In fact, after optimizing for screen size (unity, remember) what RT app couldn't run on WP?

Is this really your way of saying that phone should be a different class of device so it doesn't water down the potential sophistication of apps for real computers? What does that say about your infatuation with ARM to the detriment of x86?


#137 Order_66

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 22:45

Hmm I dunno, move to top right or bottom left, Settings>Control Panel.

Or you just WIn Key + Type Control Panel Item and just choose "Settings" as the search filter.

I wouldn't say it's "difficult" it's not harder then it was before, it's just that you and others are not used to change, and rather then adapt, people choose to abandon and go back to their old ways they are comfortable with


While maybe a small (tiny) handful of people are "not used to change" the majority of people don't like it because the os is basically user-hostile.

Most people don't like hot corners popping up unexpectedly, getting thrown back and forth from an obvious touch interface to a normal desktop and back again 30 times in 10 minutes, searching for things that used to be easy to find such as shut down or reboot or learning keyboard combinations just to pull off something that used to be a basic 'point and click' in windows 7 or xp.

Working in a large retail chain that sells a lot of computers with windows on them you get to hear what consumers like and don't like and the overwhelming majority of consumers that come in to my store complain about windows 8 every single day for mostly the reasons I have listed above, their complaints are relentless.

#138 thatguyandrew1992

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 23:01

Adjusting to Windows 8 is really easy. Don't over complicate it. I hate metro apps and their whole idea on non tablets. Therefore I don't use them on my laptop or dekstop. But I do love Windows 8. If you need to search, it's the same way. Hit the Windows key and start typing the name of your application. I have the explorer pinned so it's easy to access that and My Computer. My productivity has gone up with Windows 8. On win7 and earlier, I would never search for my programs, i would scroll through the list lol

#139 Dashel

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 23:21

If you had searched more in Win7/Vista you might be a little more upset. ;) I just don't get the aversion for 'non-tablets'. It has little to do with the device, but the stupid simplicity of the app and control method to woo aging boomers and apathetic millenials.

#140 Dot Matrix

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 23:24

Places like control panel were stupid to get too, also searching for apps never really worked for me also (It wouldn't show or would show the wrong app)

Hmm I dunno, move to top right or bottom left, Settings>Control Panel.

Or you just WIn Key + Type Control Panel Item and just choose "Settings" as the search filter.

I wouldn't say it's "difficult" it's not harder then it was before, it's just that you and others are not used to change, and rather then adapt, people choose to abandon and go back to their old ways they are comfortable with


You can also right click where the Start Button used to be for a nice power menu. ;)

#141 bryonhowley

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 23:33

How much time it took you to adjust to windows 8?


Maybe five minutes at the most. It is Windows there was really nothing at all to adjust to.

#142 pixelpixel

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 13:23

For example I like to keep my computer clean and if i want to tweak something that means installing something but sometimes it doesn't work so I like to uninstall it and i always had trouble getting to that on Windows 8.

I guess i never adapted but i did like the connectivity, I love my Xbox and some of the features it had that involved Xbox was great. It looked nice but i just found it hard to use.

Overall if you had a touchscreen computer i think i could find it a pleasant experience but for the work i want my PC for it doesn't appeal to me and i wont be going back for awhile.


I don't think MS could have made it any quicker to access programs and features. Its on the right click menu on the bottom left.

Playing Forza Horizon via smart glass was nice but that's about it. Controlling the Xbox from windows 8 was a bit strange.

#143 SpartanZX7

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 13:32

I don't think MS could have made it any quicker to access programs and features. Its on the right click menu on the bottom left.

Playing Forza Horizon via smart glass was nice but that's about it. Controlling the Xbox from windows 8 was a bit strange.


It had some features that i liked then it had a lot of things that didn't appeal to me. Waste of £25 in my opinion.

#144 xendrome

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 13:45

You can also right click where the Start Button used to be for a nice power menu. ;)


One step at a time, I don't want to overwhelm anyone :)

Most people don't like hot corners popping up unexpectedly, getting thrown back and forth from an obvious touch interface to a normal desktop and back again 30 times in 10 minutes, searching for things that used to be easy to find such as shut down or reboot or learning keyboard combinations just to pull off something that used to be a basic 'point and click' in windows 7 or xp.


I can go all day and not see the hot corners pop up, maybe their mouse needs to be cleaned or something? And I am not thrown back and fourth from the Modern UI start screen to the desktop in 10 minutes, I can go without even using the Start Screen without any issues. Shutting down, you don't even have to do anything except press the power button your on tower or laptop, and everything you can do with key combos can be accomplished with the mouse without any issue.

#145 PGHammer

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 07:55

One step at a time, I don't want to overwhelm anyone :)



I can go all day and not see the hot corners pop up, maybe their mouse needs to be cleaned or something? And I am not thrown back and fourth from the Modern UI start screen to the desktop in 10 minutes, I can go without even using the Start Screen without any issues. Shutting down, you don't even have to do anything except press the power button your on tower or laptop, and everything you can do with key combos can be accomplished with the mouse without any issue.


Pretty much.

It's not like you HAVE to go through the whole series of steps that you did in Windows 7 and earlier. (I'd know because I actually did do that - just powering off - during all three Preview test cycles, and since with the RTM. Unlike previous versions - which would throw up a hissyfit if you didn't shut down in *approved fashion*, Windows 8 (or Server 2012, for that matter) will pretty much restart cleanly - and my desktop hardware, while supposedly Windows 7 compliant, is not exactly ACPI-friendly.)

The comments from users like Growled and warwagon speak of a rather unsettling attitude, though - "Don't mess with my routine!"

#146 Dashel

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Posted 02 May 2013 - 16:39

I just gotta add this gem off the front page...

I recommend Windows RT OVER Windows 8, BECAUSE of the fact that it lacks support for x86 apps.


Yet...

A phone OS is a poor tablet OS. I already have a Lumia running WP8, so why limit myself to such a crappy UX when I can do better with Windows 8? I can do more with my Surface because the hardware is more capable than my Lumia.



#147 PGHammer

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 00:49

I just gotta add this gem off the front page...



Yet...


Hence the confliction, Dashel. On the one hand, they don't want cross-OS support between the different UIs; however, non-x86 tablets are underpowered compared to their pricier (and x86) relations.

I've made plain that if I were to purchase a tablet, it would HAVE to be an x86 tablet (with a dockable keyboard). The reasons why those two are musts are rather straightforward -

1. I HATE virtual keyboards. It's not unique to iOS or Android, as I have equal scorn for the VK in Windows as well. (Considering that I come from a clerical/secretarial background, such scorn should not be news.)

2. I'd rather NOT change my application just because I change form-factors - basically, the opposite of those that loathe ModernUI.

The second of those is where the anti-ModernUI posters and myself really differ - they think that the form-factor decides what sort of application fits, whereas I beg to differ. My largest pool of data is historical in nature, and covers more than a decade, and comes from Windows use on laptops, notebooks, netbooks, AND desktops. Are there applications (that are not customized for a specific brand of portable PC) that are ONLY usable on portable PCs? Amazingly, the answer is, in fact, no - and it's been "no" going back to the days of "luggables". One rather surprising use for the early luggables comes from Microsoft's old Business Systems (now Windows, but before Windows, Business and Personal Systems) Group - which was responsible for Windows NT for workstations and servers - the luggable server. And I'm not talking Windows 2000 Server or Server 2003, either - but NT Server 3.5/3.51. That's right - Microsoft's supposedly most-hostile-to-portable-computing operating system could indeed run, quite happily, on a luggable. Basically, so much for pigeonholing. Before seeing that, I would have quite easily been in that camp with the anti-ModernUI crowd. However, I had seen that prior to the launch of Windows NT 4 Workstation and Server - which brought yet more usability to not just running either on luggables, but ushered in the era of the laptop and the portable (as opposed to luggable) workstation and portable server - therefore, such form-factor-biased computing had no chance of taking root. The form-factor is irrelevant, and hasn't been relevant for longer than most have cared to admit - operating systems in general, and Windows (if not Windows NT in particular) has been more than capable of trainwrecking such thinking - how has it held on for so long?

If portable servers can exist (and I've given data that they have been existing since, at least, NT Server 3.x) - why is it that ModernUI applications have no place on desktops?

Such form-factor irrelevancy is part of why Windows (especially since the death of Windows 9x with the birth of Windows XP and the completion of NT's takeover) has been likened to the Borg (rather amusingly, the reference came from the Linux-distribution fanbase - what makes it amusing is that most Linux distributions share the same qualities of form-factor-irrelevancy as Windows NT long has) - given how long in the history of Windows that irrelevancy has existed, the nomenclature does, indeed, have merit. However, what was the original target of Windows NT in particular - a target shared, in fact, with common-ancestor and progenitor IBM's OS/2? UNIX - specifically, AT&T System V and the licensees (including Solaris - if anything, Solaris was the largest blip on the NT-OS/2 radar). How did Windows NT, in fact, supplant UNIX in both workstations and servers, and eventually supersede DOS and Windows 9x in more ordinary computing? It refused to let itself get hemmed in by such things as form-factor bias - as long as the hardware requirements were satisfied, the form-factor was not an issue. Solaris (and in particular, Solaris for x86) was certainly capable of going round for round with NT - Dave Cutler (who was at DEC and a co-creator of Digital VMS) certainly thought so, and so did many Solaris user groups - even those within Sun Microsystems itself. However, Solaris got hobbled by internal politics within Sun (specifically, the over-reliance on SPARC), just as IBM's mainframe and systems business tied down OS/2.

Still, given what happened to Solaris and OS/2 as a result of their internal hobbling, why would anyone want Microsoft to repeat such a mistake? The very reality that they did not make such a goof is, at least in my opinion, the biggest reason that Microsoft in general, and the NT code base in particular, is where it is today. And that (also in my opinion) is why the Start menu had to go - it introduces form-factor bias where none has existed, especially when you are ADDING new form-factors.

#148 Stoffel

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 01:11

While maybe a small (tiny) handful of people are "not used to change" the majority of people don't like it because the os is basically user-hostile.

Most people don't like hot corners popping up unexpectedly, getting thrown back and forth from an obvious touch interface to a normal desktop and back again 30 times in 10 minutes, searching for things that used to be easy to find such as shut down or reboot or learning keyboard combinations just to pull off something that used to be a basic 'point and click' in windows 7 or xp.

Working in a large retail chain that sells a lot of computers with windows on them you get to hear what consumers like and don't like and the overwhelming majority of consumers that come in to my store complain about windows 8 every single day for mostly the reasons I have listed above, their complaints are relentless.


Maybe, just maybe, you should train your staff better, so they can sell Win8 properly.

If people get introduced to Win8 by somebody who actually knows and likes the OS it's a very easy sell.
I had people coming to me with all the same crap you talk about. I sat them down and showed them how I use it (without any start menu replacement) and most of them walk away happy after a five minute demo

#149 Dot Matrix

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 01:30

I just gotta add this gem off the front page...



Yet...


Windows RT is NOT a phone OS. It is much more capable than WP8.

#150 Growled

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 02:24

If people get introduced to Win8 by somebody who actually knows and likes the OS it's a very easy sell.


I know some of you guys love Windows 8 but dang, some people just don't like Windows 8 no matter what. You guys need to accept that.