21 posts in this topic

Posted

NASSAU COUNTY, FL -- An 16-foot great white shark is off the coast of Nassau County.

The shark, named Mary Lee, is being tracked by the group Ocearch by transponder.

A map from Ocearch shows Mary Lee's travels from New England to northeast Florida.

The shark weighs about 2 tons.

source & map

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Posted

waiting for the next post which says they killed it.... why? "because"

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Posted

Searching for warm meat I guess?

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Posted

2 tons. If I saw that in the water...i would **** my shorts.

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Posted

It must eat a lot.

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Posted

waiting for the next post which says they killed it.... why? "because"

I can't wait!

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Posted

It must eat a lot.

I wonder how much a shark that size would eat in a day. A lot, I imagine.

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Posted

It really is shark week!

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Posted

2 tons. If I saw that in the water...i would **** my shorts.

Good self defense tactic. (Y)

How they know the shark's name?

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Posted

Um, why does the source article say 18-foot and the thread title here say 16-foot? The shark grow or shrink? :rofl:

EDIT: Comments section on the site says 16-foot, so damn, WTF? :wacko:

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Posted

It really is shark week!

We need to start hunting them. Before they get more aggressive and develop tools or legs or something....

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Posted

I guess that shark could use that "Do Not Track" feature of Internet Explorer. lol!! Couldn't resist.

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Posted

Um, why does the source article say 18-foot and the thread title here say 16-foot? The shark grow or shrink? :rofl:

EDIT: Comments section on the site says 16-foot, so damn, WTF? :wacko:

Good catch.

I still wonder how they got close to the shark, to measure it. :laugh:

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Posted

I still wonder how they got close to the shark, to measure it. :laugh:

Look for the guy with one hand and he can probably tell you. :p

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Posted

She probably looking for the guy that named her that supid name and eating the him all up.

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Posted

Good catch.

I still wonder how they got close to the shark, to measure it. :laugh:

You never watched that TV show ?

They get the shark with a bait and a big ****ing line and then wait for him/her to be exhausted using air containers on the line (exactly like in Jaws actually) to keep the shark afloat. I think it takes many hours lol then they get the shark on a lift and sedate him/her.

I would not like to be the guy removing the bait from the shark mouth even if he/she is sedated though lol

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Posted

Good catch.

I still wonder how they got close to the shark, to measure it. :laugh:

You can fairly accurately estimate a shark's total length by observing the distance between their dorsal fin and their tail fin, if I'm not mistaken. There is a ratio that is used, but I think it varies by species.

They might have used something like this as well: http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/the-new-way-to-measure-sharks-without-becoming-lunch.html

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Posted

Beibers new GF maybe? Om nom nom.

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Posted

^ Maybe she will eat him up.

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Posted

You can fairly accurately estimate a shark's total length by observing the distance between their dorsal fin and their tail fin, if I'm not mistaken. There is a ratio that is used, but I think it varies by species.

They might have used something like this as well: http://www.treehugge...ming-lunch.html

Nah look at the picture posted by Scorbing.

Here's a short video clip :

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