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Most Reliable SSD


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#16 articuno1au

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 06:48

My OCZ disks have been pretty good.

I had one fail on me, but I overwrote the error flags and it just kept on trucking.

I'd recommend OCZ or Samsung. The Samsungs seen quite good, and as you can see, lots of people recommending them :)

Yarp


#17 ajua

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 07:14

I have little experience of my own with SSDs but the Sand Disk Extreme 256GB that I have is been more than good. The price was a steal and the speeds are awesome.

I think many of the early SDD issues like reliability and rewrites have been improved by all manufacturers. I would say try to find the best bang for the buck.

And as other guyhere pointed out: Back everything up just in case. In my case, I keep separate file backups from folders I use on the SSD, not the entire drive because I don't mind reinstall eveything again.

#18 +kpo6969

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 07:16

Plextor M5 Pro

#19 PGHammer

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 07:40

My intuition tells me Crucial m4. Fast and a great Marvell controller.


Three-way tie between Crucial m4 (Marvell controller), Intel 330/520 (modded SandForce controller), and Samsung 83x/84x (Samsung MCX controller).

Note that the generic SandForce controller is not listed (along with the generic Marvell controller) - also MIA is the newer version of the OCZ Vertex 4 (modded Marvell controller, different from the controller of the Crucial m4).

#20 +Medfordite

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 08:06

On this topic, we have been switching laptops at work over to Samsung 840's but haven't seen any failures or issues yet, albeit we are just starting to convert over and a few months old. The drives are in laptops with 100% data on SSD. Also drives are encrypted with a third party program so that makes more use I suppose.

I have been wanting to switch to SSD myself in the past but have been too gun shy about it because of the relatively short life on them. I have figured the best practice would be to install OS only on SSD and then use HDD for data/programs etc.. Would this in theory bring the life span of the drive to last longer since the amount of writes is less?

#21 The King of GnG

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 11:35

I would tend to agree, but the performance you get from the SSD is worth the risk of it dying on you.


It's a choice you have to make. And until SSD drives won't have something more meaningful for data storage like PCM of memristor chips (let's say, within the next five years?), I will always choose to spend the extra money an SSD will cost on a server-grade hard disk drives with spinning platters....

#22 OP primexx

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 22:06

It seems like the general concensus is a toss-up between Crucial M4 and Samsung 830/840. I read on Anandtech that their review units of the 840 Pro both broke, has that been fixed? And are there significant differences between the Marvell controller on Crucial and the Samsung controllers?

It's a choice you have to make. And until SSD drives won't have something more meaningful for data storage like PCM of memristor chips (let's say, within the next five years?), I will always choose to spend the extra money an SSD will cost on a server-grade hard disk drives with spinning platters....


that's assuming that you value reliability above all else.

#23 Hum

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 22:36

Regardless of "reliable" or not, every SSD can and will brick eventually.


Live fast -- die young. :shifty:

And it's always good advice to Back-up, no matter what drive you use.

#24 SlimShady

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 23:04

And the general warranty is a good thing, right. So you can RMA the drive if it would fail even on short-term.

#25 Arkos Reed

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 23:10

Plextor M5 Pro

I second that.
The Plextor M3/M5 series are basically Crucial M4s without the firmware problems (legendary Plextor Firmware engineering and QA) and with an included 5 year parts warranty (the 1st 3 years you don't even pay shipping in case of a RMA, they send someone pick up the drive at your doorstep)

#26 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 00:05

I had two OCZ Vertex LEs fail but my current OCZ Vertex 3 has been rock solid for about a year and a half now. The performance they offer is certainly worth the risk, especially if they're only used as a system disk and important data is stored on other drives. HDDs are simply too slow.

#27 Hum

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 01:12

I'm curious -- how do you automatically get Windows to store your videos, music, pictures, documents, to a secondary regular hard drive ?

Or do you just need to keep running a back-up utility ?

Can you preserve your Registry settings, e-mails, favorites, etc. on the back-up drive, in case of SSD failure ?

#28 Inertia

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 02:08

I have ran into problems with crucial M4 SSD's Mushkin and Chronos SSD's I Run OCZ Agility 3 SSDs in all of my machines and many of my supported clients have them with no problems.

I am yet to try Samsung ones, I found a good place to be with the Agility 3's and stuck with it for now.