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10 of the world's biggest unsolved mysteries

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#1 Hum

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 16:14

10 of the world's biggest unsolved mysteries

Voynich Manuscript

Named after the Polish-American antiquarian bookseller Wilfrid M. Voynich, who acquired it in 1912, the Voynich Manuscript is a detailed 240-page book written in a language or script that is completely unknown. Its pages are also filled with colorful drawings of strange diagrams, odd events and plants that do not seem to match any known species, adding to the intrigue of the document and the difficulty of deciphering it. The original author of the manuscript remains unknown, but carbon dating has revealed that its pages were made sometime between 1404 and 1438. It has been called "the world's most mysterious manuscript."

Kryptos

Kryptos is a mysterious encrypted sculpture designed by artist Jim Sanborn which sits right outside the headquarters of the CIA in Langley, Va. It's so mysterious, in fact, that not even the CIA has completely cracked the code.

The sculpture contains four inscriptions, and although three of them have been cracked, the fourth remains elusive. In 2006 Sanborn let slip that there are clues in the first inscriptions to the last one, and in 2010 he released another clue: the Letters 64-69 NYPVTT in part 4 encode the text BERLIN.

Beale Ciphers

The Beale Ciphers are a set of three ciphertexts that supposedly reveal the location of one of the grandest buried treasures in U.S. history: thousands of pounds of gold, silver and jewels. The treasure was originally obtained by a mysterious man named Thomas Jefferson Beale in 1818 while prospecting in Colorado.

Of the three ciphertexts, only the second one has been cracked. Interestingly, the U.S. Declaration of Independence turned out to be the key — a curious fact given that Beale shares his name with the author of the Declaration of Independence.

Phaistos Disc

The mystery of the Phaistos Disc is a story that sounds like something out of an Indiana Jones movie. Discovered by Italian archaeologist Luigi Pernier in 1908 in the Minoan palace-site of Phaistos, the disc is made of fired clay and contains mysterious symbols that may represent an unknown form of hieroglyphics. It is believed that it was designed sometime in the second millennium BC.

Some scholars believe that the hieroglyphs resemble symbols of Linear A and Linear B, scripts once used in ancient Crete. The only problem? Linear A also eludes decipherment.

Shugborough inscription

Look from afar at the 18th-century Shepherd's Monument in Staffordshire, England, and you might take it as nothing more than a sculpted re-creation of Nicolas Poussin's famous painting, “Arcadian Shepherds.” Look closer, though, and you'll notice a curious sequence of letters: DOUOSVAVVM — a code that has eluded decipherment for over 250 years.

Though the identity of the code carver remains a mystery, some have speculated that the code could be a clue left behind by the Knights Templar about the whereabouts of the Holy Grail.

Many of the world's greatest minds have tried to crack the code and failed, including Charles Dickens and Charles Darwin.

Tamam Shud case

Considered to be one of Australia's most profound mysteries, the Tamam Shud Case revolves around an unidentified man found dead in December 1948 on Somerton beach in Adelaide, Australia. Aside from the fact that the man could never be identified, the mystery deepened after a tiny piece of paper with the words "Tamam Shud" was found in a hidden pocket sewn within the dead man's trousers. (It is also referred to as "Taman Shud.")

The phrase translates as "ended" or "finished" and is a phrase used on the last page of a collection of poems called “The Rubaiyat” of Omar Khayyam. Adding to the mystery, a copy of Khayyam's collection was later found that contained a scribbled code in it believed to have been left by the dead man himself.

The Wow! Signal

One summer night in 1977, Jerry Ehman, a volunteer for SETI, or the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, may have become the first man ever to receive an intentional message from an alien world. Ehman was scanning radio waves from deep space, hoping to randomly come across a signal that bore the hallmarks of one that might be sent by intelligent aliens, when he saw his measurements spike.

The signal lasted for 72 seconds, the longest period of time it could possibly be measured by the array that Ehman was using. It was loud and appeared to have been transmitted from a place no human has gone before: in the constellation Sagittarius near a star called Tau Sagittarii, 120 light-years away.

Zodiac letters

The Zodiac letters are a series of four encrypted messages believed to have been written by the famous Zodiac Killer, a serial killer who terrorized residents of the San Francisco Bay Area in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The letters were likely written as a way to taunt journalists and police, and though one of the messages has been deciphered, the three others remain uncracked.

The identity of the Zodiac Killer also remains a mystery, though no Zodiac murders have been identified since 1970.

(This isn't actually true. William Joseph Grant was unofficially revealed to be the Zodiac -- he died at home in Feb. 2012)

Georgia Guidestones

The Georgia Guidestones, sometimes referred to as the "American Stonehenge," is a granite monument erected in Elbert County, Ga., in 1979. The stones are engraved in eight languages — English, Spanish, Swahili, Hindi, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese and Russian — each relaying 10 "new" commandments for "an Age of Reason." The stones also line up with certain astronomical features.

Though the monument contains no encrypted messages, its purpose and origin remain shrouded in mystery. They were commissioned by a man who has yet to be properly identified, who went by the pseudonym of R.C. Christian.

Of the 10 commandments, the first one is perhaps the most controversial: "Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature." Many have taken it to be a license to cull the human population down to the specified number, and critics of the stones have called for them to be destroyed. Some conspiracy theorists even believe they may have been designed by a "Luciferian secret society" calling for a new world order.

Rongorongo

Rongorongo is a system of mysterious glyphs discovered written on various artifacts on Easter Island. Many believe they represent a lost system of writing or proto-writing and could be one of just three or four independent inventions of writing in human history.

The glyphs remain undecipherable, and their true messages — which some believe could offer hints about the perplexing collapse of the statue-building Easter Island civilization — may be lost forever.

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#2 M_Lyons10

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 17:54

Hm... Voynich Manuscript sounds pretty interesting... I'd actually never heard of that one before. You'd think it would have been the focus of at least one conspiracy special or something. LOL

#3 Lord Method Man

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 17:57

What about the Toynbee Tiles

#4 Asrokhel

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 17:58

Hm... Voynich Manuscript sounds pretty interesting... I'd actually never heard of that one before. You'd think it would have been the focus of at least one conspiracy special or something. LOL


It has been.

I've heard of the following, the majority through documentaries, etc:

Voynich Manuscript
Kryptos
Phaistos Disc
The Wow! Signal
Zodiac letters
Georgia Guidestones

#5 Phouchg

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 21:31

Voynich Manuscript is believed by some to be trolling instead of being an actual crypto. Which, frankly, just adds to the mystery.

#6 Growled

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 01:30

Interesting stuff. I love a good mystery.

#7 Asrokhel

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 16:26

Voynich Manuscript is believed by some to be trolling instead of being an actual crypto. Which, frankly, just adds to the mystery.


What if it isn't, I think the reason they can't understand the language, script or decrypt it is because it comes from an alternate Earth.

#8 Growled

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 01:46

What if it isn't, I think the reason they can't understand the language, script or decrypt it is because it comes from an alternate Earth.


Are you Hum in disguise?

#9 Asrokhel

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 04:44

Oh, so because I have my beliefs, I must be Hum, so everyone on the planet who shares the same beliefs must be Hum as well!

#10 Aheer.R.S.

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 04:49

Shugborough inscription

Look from afar at the 18th-century Shepherd's Monument in Staffordshire, England, and you might take it as nothing more than a sculpted re-creation of Nicolas Poussin's famous painting, “Arcadian Shepherds.” Look closer, though, and you'll notice a curious sequence of letters: DOUOSVAVVM — a code that has eluded decipherment for over 250 years.

Though the identity of the code carver remains a mystery, some have speculated that the code could be a clue left behind by the Knights Templar about the whereabouts of the Holy Grail.

Many of the world's greatest minds have tried to crack the code and failed, including Charles Dickens and Charles Darwin.



Also please remember that the alphabet used was different back then which only further's the mystery

#11 Andre S.

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 05:05

The meaning of life is pretty deep as well.

#12 Aheer.R.S.

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 05:07

That is one of the most stupidest comments, besides all the postings from Shane Nokes, that I've read on neowin. We used the same alphabet back then, and even before that, that we are using now!


Riiiiight.
There is evidence, documented in history books.
Also I Happen to live in Wolverhampton, and it took me 30-40 minutes to get to Newport, where there was a tour that took me and my wife around the area.

#13 Guth

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 05:11

Tamam Shud case

Considered to be one of Australia's most profound mysteries, the Tamam Shud Case revolves around an unidentified man found dead in December 1948 on Somerton beach in Adelaide, Australia. Aside from the fact that the man could never be identified, the mystery deepened after a tiny piece of paper with the words "Tamam Shud" was found in a hidden pocket sewn within the dead man's trousers. (It is also referred to as "Taman Shud.")

The phrase translates as "ended" or "finished" and is a phrase used on the last page of a collection of poems called “The Rubaiyat” of Omar Khayyam. Adding to the mystery, a copy of Khayyam's collection was later found that contained a scribbled code in it believed to have been left by the dead man himself.


I'd heard of this one before. Although it was called "The Somerton Man" I don't remember where exactly but I got quite interested in it. Read the whole wikipedia article and a whole lot of other articles on it. I also watched a documentary (on youtube i think).
Here are the links if anyone is interested. I found them a good read/watch.
Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia....Taman_Shud_Case
University of Adelaide: Who Killed The Somerton Man: https://www.eleceng....e_Somerton_man?
Weirld (bit "out there"): http://www.weirld.co...-Agent-Spy.html
Youtube: (part 1 of 3)

A google search will bring up much more. I sat for hours and hours going through loads of related stuff. Just find this particular one really interesting for some reason.

#14 HighwayGlider

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 06:25

Voynich Manuscript is believed by some to be trolling instead of being an actual crypto. Which, frankly, just adds to the mystery.

This!
Or someone who's been trying to describe what he's seeing when stoned.

#15 OP Hum

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 17:57

Are you Hum in disguise?


A lost twin -- separated at birth ... poor Edgar ...