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Posted

It has been pointed out (but I think some of you missed it) that the architecture following the one talked about in the article will be LGA also..

yeah, that's why I asked is this a laptop only line a few posts back

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Posted

well that's what I meant, their CPU division goes under

which? outside of thin systems, and laptops, and ultra low wattage systems, virtually all desktops are LGA type systems

Well, I should rephrase. I think AMD will focus more on APUs.

And, I think thin systems, laptops, and ultrabooks, etc make up the majority of the consumer PC market at this point. Even the desktops that are left are often all in ones, or come with barebones motherboards that don't support much in the way of upgrading.

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Posted

Yes, because Broadwell is only a notebook CPU, in 2014 it will still be Haswell in desktop and Broadwell in notebooks only.

Never trust google translate. Specially not from asian languages to english.

Broadwell will be LGA1150. Skylake and Skymont will be LGA based too: last 2 will have the PCH on the CPU package. Either ondie or shared like the Haswell/Broadwell ULT. Basicly meaning Mbs become downgraded connector boards only.

From some of the comments

This article says:

-- Intel will not provide new products for Desktop and non-BGA laptop segments in Broadwell era

-- Instead, they will provide higher clocked Haswell for those segments in 2014

-- Broadwell is "more than tick", and it will include some technologies that were previously planned for Skylake

-- This is because Intel needs to be more competitive in the tablet market, and this may mean the end of Tick-Tock strategy

-- It mentions nothing about Skylake and later or if they will be LGA or not for the desktop

So this sounds more like broadwell will be redesigned as pure mobile chip as intel skips tick/tock and the next "normal" cpu replacement will be skylake.

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Posted

like someone already mentioned, not allowing us to choose the cpu seperately means that we are stuck with whatever CPU the OEM chooses to pair their mobo with... this would just be like buying laptops minus the portability or the energy efficiency

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Posted

like someone already mentioned, not allowing us to choose the cpu seperately means that we are stuck with whatever CPU the OEM chooses to pair their mobo with... this would just be like buying laptops minus the portability or the energy efficiency

And the chip in question is designed for portable devices..laptops, tablets, phones etc. Do you have a phone that you can upgrade your CPU in?

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Posted

This is an unsubstatiated rumor that was posted on Xbitlabs.com yesterday. It has not been confirmed.

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Posted

It has been pointed out (but I think some of you missed it) that the architecture following the one talked about in the article will be LGA also..

Actually, the original article states that Haswell, & Broadwell, are both aimed towards the mobile (tablet) market

hence the SoC, ending the "Tick-Tock" product development Intel was known for...

yet nothing has been said/nor confirmed about Skylake which may still come under LGA

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Posted

could this drive costs WAY WAY down? Manufacture's maybe would be able to not worry about Product #263 working with 1,000,000 possible parts from countless makers? Maybe get a 100% super tuned PC with I7 performance for $200 or so? Kind of like an pre-built console like XBOX for example having a case that can't (without voiding warranty) be opened.

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Posted

Yes it will drive costs down for intel.

No it will not drive down costs for consumers.

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Posted

I wonder if this will be another one of those occasions where a company makes an enormous mistake that pushes their competition way ahead of them.

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Posted

Don't Intel force you to buy a new socket board for each new CPU release anyway?

Not always. Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge products operate with each other. Socket 478 lasted a fair while, as did LGA775. True it's becoming a bit more commonplace of late, but usually sockets last for at least 1 tick and 1 tock cycle.

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Posted

I wonder if this will be another one of those occasions where a company makes an enormous mistake that pushes their competition way ahead of them.

I hope AMD makes a come back. :(

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Posted

if this rumor is true and if those CPUs where meant for the desktop/laptop market (hopefully not), it will be a regression instead of progress. I still remember the days of 286 and 386 and they where a pain in the butt to upgrade.

Motherboard+CPU+286+16Mhz+1Mb+M209.jpg

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Posted

if this rumor is true and if those CPUs where meant for the desktop/laptop market (hopefully not), it will be a regression instead of progress. I still remember the days of 286 and 386 and they where a pain in the butt to upgrade.

Motherboard+CPU+286+16Mhz+1Mb+M209.jpg

Actually, those PLCC chips where pretty easy to replace, you just needed a grabber tool to pull them out... only problem wasn't too many options to go to

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Posted

Intel kills off the desktop, PCs go with it. What will we do if we can't upgrade our rigs?

http://semiaccurate....pcs-go-with-it/

Oh jolly. What a great world it would be when everything becomes as closed and unyeilding as apple. We might have to thank them for this devolopment if this is true.

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Posted

Oh jolly. What a great world it would be when everything becomes as closed and unyeilding as apple. We might have to thank them for this devolopment if this is true.

oh heck go back to the days where it was "not allowed" to even open your case up.... they use to put security seals and all kind of fun stuff in them to stop you... ahh the IBM lease days...

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Posted

oh heck go back to the days where it was "not allowed" to even open your case up.... they use to put security seals and all kind of fun stuff in them to stop you... ahh the IBM lease days...

Yea I do remember that but Apple does it with everything! The hardware, the software heck even the shapes of their devices!

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Posted

Yea I do remember that but Apple does it with everything! The hardware, the software heck even the shapes of their devices!

if you owned a manufacturing company, you would prefer your stuff not to be opened up either. Notice I say "prefer". When people open it up, it compounds the mess-it-up likelihood..

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Posted

Yea I do remember that but Apple does it with everything! The hardware, the software heck even the shapes of their devices!

I've taken apart most of my Macs at one point or another. They're not that locked down, although it's a bit ludicrous to upgrade anything but the memory on an iMac.

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Posted

Oh jolly. What a great world it would be when everything becomes as closed and unyeilding as apple. We might have to thank them for this devolopment if this is true.

Actually I'm pretty sure Intel has looked at it's sales figures and confirmed the truth that in the vast majority of cases, even enthusiasts rarely change their CPU's without changing the motherboards. So it really does make sense to combine them rather than sell them separately.

The results could be quite interesting, and any change to the PC H/W arena is exciting over same old/same old.

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Posted

Actually I'm pretty sure Intel has looked at it's sales figures and confirmed the truth that in the vast majority of cases, even enthusiasts rarely change their CPU's without changing the motherboards. So it really does make sense to combine them rather than sell them separately.

The results could be quite interesting, and any change to the PC H/W arena is exciting over same old/same old. It's just process...

I've taken apart most of my Macs at one point or another. They're not that locked down, although it's a bit ludicrous to upgrade anything but the memory on an iMac.

if you owned a manufacturing company, you would prefer your stuff not to be opened up either. Notice I say "prefer". When people open it up, it compounds the mess-it-up likelihood..

I think you guys aren't getting the full meaning of what I am trying to say, Apple does not just not want you not to open up the hardware. They don't want you to do anything at all, the operating system is closed and unyeilding, their software and well just about everything they do is closed. Heck they don't even want you to think. Just return the product becuase your unable to do anything with it and they swindle you out of even more money.

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Posted

I think you guys aren't getting the full meaning of what I am trying to say, Apple does not just not want you not to open up the hardware. They don't want you to do anything at all, the operating system is closed and unyeilding, their software and well just about everything they do is closed. Heck they don't even want you to think. Just return the product becuase your unable to do anything with it and they swindle you out of even more money.

I take it you've never used a Mac before. :laugh:

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Posted

If you look back, upgrading a processor is not that beneficial anymore, because to achieve real performance gains, you actually have to change everything: from motherboard, to RAM and storage.

Also, I think the cost will go down significantly.

This is a great move from Intel, regarding the consumer and performance market. But of course enthusiast won't be happy: they're actually never happy with anything they got anyway. :p

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Posted

I take it you've never used a Mac before. :laugh:

Actually Im a graphic designer I had a mac for many years! ;P lol

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Posted

If you look back, upgrading a processor is not that beneficial anymore, because to achieve real performance gains, you actually have to change everything: from motherboard, to RAM and storage.

Also, I think the cost will go down significantly.

What?

http://www.techspot.com/review/523-ivy-bridge-intel-core-i7-3770k/page4.html

Techspot and every review site says you are wrong.

Cost will go down significantly, why? Why does intel want to save you money? What benefit does that give intel? Please do tell me.

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