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and we are back to iPhone


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#61 @Leo

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 19:37

So the operating system is years ahead because you can change gadgets. :laugh:
You said it, the AppStore is unmatched. Rather, the quality of the apps on it is unmatched. That is what matters. The OS is there to service applications. If that changes in the future, the other platforms will be superior.


#62 PhilTheThrill

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 19:43

Not trolling or saying "<name> is wrong for using iphone" but iOS is far from "polished". Even after 5+ years different menus and options can look entirely different. It's far from consistent.

(also i'm not inferring that any other OS is much better in this regard)

#63 Tom-Helge

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 19:43

So the operating system is years ahead because you can change gadgets. :laugh:
You said it, the AppStore is unmatched. Rather, the quality of the apps on it is unmatched. That is what matters. The OS is there to service applications. If that changes in the future, the other platforms will be superior.


AppStore is better than Play Store, but that's just barely. The difference is so small that it almost doesn't matter anylonger. But still, AppStore have the little edge.

But that alone isn't the factor that makes it better than Android. It's the whole package that counts. And Android wins here by a large margin.

#64 Bizkit

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 19:54

AppStore is better than Play Store, but that's just barely. The difference is so small that it almost doesn't matter anylonger. But still, AppStore have the little edge.

But that alone isn't the factor that makes it better than Android. It's the whole package that counts. And Android wins here by a large margin.


And that is your opinion. It comes down to some people like things one way, others a different way. Otherwise we would only have 1 brand of everything. Only Pepsi, only Ford Focus cars, etc. If you don't like iOS that's fine, or if you don't like Android that's fine too. What makes you less of a person is when you start bashing other people for not liking or thinking the same way you do.

#65 Tom-Helge

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 20:01

And that is your opinion. It comes down to some people like things one way, others a different way. Otherwise we would only have 1 brand of everything. Only Pepsi, only Ford Focus cars, etc. If you don't like iOS that's fine, or if you don't like Android that's fine too. What makes you less of a person is when you start bashing other people for not liking or thinking the same way you do.


If you take your time to look on the YouTube videos on my playlist as i posted longer up, then you WILL realize why i like Android better than iOS. And i'm not alone on saying this, and this is for sure.

Android is more user friendly, more easier to use, lets you customize it the way you want it to be to let it be as effective as possible to you. Android adopts to you and not you that have to adopt to the OS. Android lets you decide over your device, witch is a huge advantage over the OS deciding for you.

Why shouldn't this be better than iOS where you have zero possibilities?

EDIT: And no, i didn't bash any peoples here. All i was bashing was iOS.

Learn to read.

#66 +AJerman

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 20:02

All,

Shut up and use what you like!

#67 OP SMELTN

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 20:14

Sadly, it is missing Google Street View.


This is my question. How often, honestly, do people really use street view? ESPECIALLY when you are driving your freakin car? I mean seriously? If you are walking, I could see using street view, or if you are actually pre-planning your trip, I could see using it to see what the building looks like or something, but come on.... DRIVING?

#68 @Leo

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 20:27

Not when driving the car. But when you want to see how the street you want to get to looks like, or where exactly is what you are looking for, it is really good.

#69 tsupersonic

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 20:44

No, the screen isn't bad. It's a universal problem with that type of display.
The S3 has a pentile display which is inferior to an RGB display in terms of quality, so that's what causes the pixelation. I don't think the Note 2 has a pentile display, so it may not have those problems.

Yeah, ask 99% of the consumers, and they wouldn't be able to tell the difference between pentile vs. non. If you're going by pure specs, then yes. But, in everyday usage, most people wouldn't notice (or even care). IMO, the whole Galaxy lineup is massively overrated. The HTC One X series is overall better imo. Plus the recently released Droid DNA trumps the Note 2 in terms of certain specs.

Either way, these comparisons are getting out of hand. There are so many fanboys on this forum, and it is so apparent who likes what platform. Basically, use what you like/what works for you, and stop trying to persuade other people that one platform is better than the other. Every platform has its advantages and disadvantages. Also, no one gives a flying **** what anyone else likes. For me, the iPhone is vastly outdated (has been for a long time), and just flat out doesn't offer the features that I need from a phone.

#70 Hardcore Til I Die

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 20:45

I kept buying flagship Android devices and felt something was missing.

Got an iPhone 5. Sure, it's missing lots of features that my Galaxy S3 (and indeed, S2) had, but it just works better.

It's missing NFC, but NFC payments aren't supported in my country yet (there are NFC terminals but no apps that support the payments!) and I don't need to toggle settings using NFC tags because battery life is great when I just leave settings on all the time.

It has limited multitasking, but the battery lasts a lot longer and I don't really see a difference with the way I use the phone. I still get notified about new Facebook posts, emails, etc, but it's all done using push notifications which use less battery than having lots of apps permanently running.

iOS is still smoother than Android even with Project Butter too. My Nexus 7 gets stuck sometimes whilst scrolling, but my iPad and iPhone rarely ever do.

Things are just more well thought out on iOS. Everything works very well (other than Maps!)

#71 @Leo

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 21:39

Limited multitasking? It behaves exactly how Android multitasking behaves. Applications are suspended when going to the background. Like Android, some applications are allowed to work in a hybrid mode. Android allows the installation of services, which are another application running in the background. Not many apps use this option, and it wastes more battery life. Apple has chose another model, a system-wide push support, which is much more efficient. It works good enough for most types of software.

#72 Hardcore Til I Die

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 21:53

Limited multitasking? It behaves exactly how Android multitasking behaves. Applications are suspended when going to the background. Like Android, some applications are allowed to work in a hybrid mode. Android allows the installation of services, which are another application running in the background. Not many apps use this option, and it wastes more battery life. Apple has chose another model, a system-wide push support, which is much more efficient. It works good enough for most types of software.


I believe Android apps can run in the background running any tasks they like. Correct me if I'm wrong.

For example, IRC clients which must remain connected to servers and active are possible on Android, but not on iOS.

#73 @Leo

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 22:13

The ways Android apps avoid being killed in the background has a parallel on iOS with the limited Background APIs. The BroadcastReceivers component lets apps wake up for a short time to run some task or another, and then shunts it back to a background state. This is useful for location check-ins or file syncing.

The other way to forcibly maintain an app in the background is the Service component. An app that is running as a Service can run indefinitely and should almost never be killed by the system. This is what makes Android multitasking unique. Regular processes will be ended before a service, and a developer can further indicate a Service’s importance by running it as “foreground,” but this requires a notification icon to be persistently visible in the notification bar. You will see this behavior with automation apps like Locale as well as with music playback.

http://www.extremetech.com/computing/112013-how-multitasking-works-on-android-and-ios/2

iOS backgrounding is actually much more advanced, as iOS controls can free their allocated memory to allow the app a continued life, and are restored when the app is restored. This does not happen with Android. Perhaps your example of IRC client hits something that is limited with iOS, and there are other examples. But they are few, while the method implemented in iOS, and limitations in place, make people write better software. Server-initiated push is in the vast majority of cases a much more elegant solution than a living client polling for data. Apple's push deamon is alive, of course, but that's a very purposefully build single deamon for the entire software library. Sure, it makes it more difficult for developers to manager a server infrastructure, but that is not my concern as a software consumer on an iPhone or iPad.

#74 Shadrack

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 22:31

It has limited multitasking, but the battery lasts a lot longer and I don't really see a difference with the way I use the phone. I still get notified about new Facebook posts, emails, etc, but it's all done using push notifications which use less battery than having lots of apps permanently running.


It is very difficult for me to make comparisons between THIS generation hardware because I'm comparing an iPhone 4 to a Nexus 4 which has more than 2 years of technology between them. That being said, my observations about Android was that multitasking is much more immediate and ready-to-go when compared to how it works on my iPhone 4. Even small things, like getting SMS Messages in my non-stock BiteSMS app, are peculiar in iOS. I receive all these push notifications but when I open them the app spends about 5 seconds *loading* this data before it is ready to use. Seems like all 3rd party apps are like this on iOS.

On the other hand, touch response is so much more "buttery smooth" on my iPhone 4 than the Nexus 4 across ALL applications. Nexus 4, some apps I would describe as "buttery smooth" other apps (such as Chrome) there is a noticeable input lag (not an FPS stutter, but a system response lag) that I think Google and iron out more.

#75 ramzorz

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 22:38

Why don't you guys try Windows Phone 8?

It really is a great mobile OS, and as more people come to the platform, more apps will also be developed for it.


I agree, Windows Phone devices are highly underrated. I love iOS, but nothing can compare my Windows Phone. It's just a solid, stable operating system that has features built into that most other operating systems require 3rd party applications.



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