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Why wooden houses again as hurricanes rampant in America?


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#1 JohnsonBox

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:19

The houses torn to pieces by hurricanes were often seen in America. The reconstructions of them after the disasters are, again, rebuilding the houses with wood. The phenomenon has puzzled me for long. Because they can still fall victims of another hurricane. Why Americans keep doing this? Why not introduce brick concrete structures instead of wood ones?


#2 episode

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:21

Because wood is far less expensive, easier to change (home improvements), and much faster to put up. Just to start. A wood structure can be just as sturdy as brick. The houses you saw from Sandy were old, and not built to hurricane codes.

#3 vetneufuse

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:28

The houses torn to pieces by hurricanes were often seen in America. The reconstructions of them after the disasters are, again, rebuilding the houses with wood. The phenomenon has puzzled me for long. Because they can still fall victims of another hurricane. Why Americans keep doing this? Why not introduce brick concrete structures instead of wood ones?


brick structures are just as hurricane prone, when we have hurricanes the pressure change has been noted to even take down completely brick / morter structures... lots of strip malls, commercial buildings fall down... they are made of brick and block almost always anymore...

and if you build CORRECTLY with wood framing using the correct tie down methods you don't have a problem... the main problem is, people are still skimping on the correct steel tie downs, not anchoring the roofs (the first main problem) not anchoring to the brick foundation correctly (2nd main problem) and during a hurricane you need a way to handle the pressure changes... you can't have your house high pressure and a massive low pressure front hit it... it can littlearly bulge out to the point it breaks... same thing happens with block

places like Florida have some of the strictest building codes, and even with that a cat5 hurricane still can destroy buildings... unless you are building your house out of steel beams and steel reinforced walls (no normal home owner is going to do this, it costs WAY to much) you are vulnerable to some degree

now if you are looking at New York and this last storm, the problem was most of those houses where never built for any kind of hurricane, and most of them where built many many decades ago even at times when there was no building codes to follow

#4 OP JohnsonBox

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:30

Because wood is far less expensive, easier to change (home improvements), and much faster to put up. Just to start. A wood structure can be just as sturdy as brick. The houses you saw from Sandy were old, and not built to hurricane codes.


Sounds you're quite familiar with the situation. Thanks for replying.
Are you American who lives there for more than twenty years?

#5 MikeChipshop

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:42

Wood = cheaper and not much less resistant to high wind than brick buildings.

#6 Jason Stillion

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:43

Making houses in dome / octagon shape vs square would be better against strong winds.

#7 OP JohnsonBox

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:46

brick structures are just as hurricane prone, when we have hurricanes the pressure change has been noted to even take down completely brick / morter structures... lots of strip malls, commercial buildings fall down... they are made of brick and block almost always anymore...

and if you build CORRECTLY with wood framing using the correct tie down methods you don't have a problem... the main problem is, people are still skimping on the correct steel tie downs, not anchoring the roofs (the first main problem) not anchoring to the brick foundation correctly (2nd main problem) and during a hurricane you need a way to handle the pressure changes... you can't have your house high pressure and a massive low pressure front hit it... it can littlearly bulge out to the point it breaks... same thing happens with block

places like Florida have some of the strictest building codes, and even with that a cat5 hurricane still can destroy buildings... unless you are building your house out of steel beams and steel reinforced walls (no normal home owner is going to do this, it costs WAY to much) you are vulnerable to some degree

now if you are looking at New York and this last storm, the problem was most of those houses where never built for any kind of hurricane, and most of them where built many many decades ago even at times when there was no building codes to follow


Excellent!

I've never seen any pictures about American commercial buildings felled by any hurricanes. Would you mind to post some here?

#8 daniel_rh

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:51

Interesting topic, I was wondering the same thing

#9 vetneufuse

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:57

Excellent!

I've never seen any pictures about American commercial buildings felled by any hurricanes. Would you mind to post some here?


Posted Image
Hurricane Katrina


shutter stock has some "stock footage' of some of the commercial devistation also http://footage.shutt...ne-katrina.html

there's tons of stuff out there just search for it

heck hurricanes aren't even the worst of it, tornados can destroy commercial buildings... we had schools destroyed by them and schools are almost always steel and brick construction

#10 episode

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 13:58

Also, most of the damage from Sandy was from flooding/tidal surge, not the winds.

#11 vetneufuse

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 14:02

Also, most of the damage from Sandy was from flooding/tidal surge, not the winds.


yeah and having brick outside isn't going to stop water from destroying electical, and drywall

#12 The Laughing Man

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 14:08

From reading the replies , sounds like OP is gathering information to write a report lol

#13 OP JohnsonBox

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 14:12

Posted Image
Hurricane Katrina


shutter stock has some "stock footage' of some of the commercial devistation also http://footage.shutt...ne-katrina.html

there's tons of stuff out there just search for it

heck hurricanes aren't even the worst of it, tornados can destroy commercial buildings... we had schools destroyed by them and schools are almost always steel and brick construction


Very informative.

Is it true that statistically, no house in America would have been destroyed twice by hurricane or tornado?

#14 Charisma

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 14:17

I asked about this when I first moved here (Alabama, ugh) because they have tornadoes all the time.
The answer I got is about the same--it's cheaper, plus the insurance covers to replace it anyway, people seemed very flippant about it. O_o

#15 DAOWAce

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 14:34

Brick houses sure are sturdy: Posted Image

Personally, I would prefer a brick house; mainly because it's far more noise resistant than wood. Insulation can only do so much and wood transfers sound waves very easily as well.

Also, most of the damage from Sandy near the coast was from flooding/tidal surge, not the winds.

FTFY.

All the damage in my area (inland) was caused by the wind. We had no power for 12 days (including water due to being on a well). There are STILL downed trees and wires around here, if you can believe that.



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