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Timan

Best 802.11n 5ghz router?

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Another vote for the Netgear WNDR4500. Awesome router. If too expensive, get the WNDR4000.

ASUS are new to routers and their buggy firmware is still a problem IMO. While they look good on paper and speedtests, they have proven to not be very reliable.

I have never found Netgear to be any good until their WNDR3700/4000/4500 series. They really are excellent wireless routers.

I wouldn't count out the current (v4) iteration of the WNDR3700, either.

I just installed mine (replaced the WNR3500v1) this week (Thursday, in fact), and it is proving itself superior to every other router I've used or had experience with.

First off - they DID apparently fix the over-bright LED problem (it was an issue with older versions of both this router AND the WNR3500v1/v2/L) - the router no longer rivals my lit window case fan for brightest object in a dark room other than the display!

Second - IPv6 support is available; it's disabled by default, though. (The issue is ISP support - not support by the OSes; fortunately, Comcast supports IPv6 here, so I could enable in in the router's Advanced Setup. Therefore, every connection that supports IPv6 can *use* IPv6, which is the Windows 8 desktop [mine], the Windows 7 desktop in the library [Mom's} and even Mom's legacy laptop running XP SP3. Mom's smart TV all the way upstairs is on the completely-separate 5 GHz N band by its lonesome - no idea if it supports IPv6.)

Third - the connection speed (wired OR wireless) is fast. Sync-up speed - even over 100 mbps, rather than gigabit - is decidedly zippier than the WNR3500v1. (That is something that made no sense, as the older router ALSO had gigabit WAN/LAN; however, as it aged, I started having issues with connection timeouts - not just on Mom's PC in the library on the main floor, by my own desktop, which is less than a foot from the router via a wired connection. That means it was either the chipset, the router ports, or both.

Fourth - the still. inexpensive price - it's $90. (For once, Newegg and Best Buy have the same price; both undercut MicroCenter, which has the same router for $10 more. Amazon has the same price as Newegg and Best Buy.)

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The DD-WRT version's range is worse... Right now I'm using OpenWRT and it's so far the best option.... but 5 GHz still isn't really an option.

The v4 doesn't support DD-WRT (different/newer Atheros chipset than even the v3) - however, I had nary a problem setting up the 5 GHz network to use a different SSID (that is, in fact, the default with the v4 - no idea if that is the case with older versions). I have Mom's smart TV (the only 5 GHz supporting wireless device) on that network by itself (different SSID also equals different passphrase - makes for better intrusion detection, too), and it's two floors up. Connects better than it did to the WNR3500v1 it replaced (however, the older router had no 5 GHz support).

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I definitely like the RT-N56U. But I'd go for an AC router if I was buying now.

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I definitely like the RT-N56U. But I'd go for an AC router if I was buying now.

The issue *there* is why would you need the support for .ac now - if you have nothing that supports the protocol. (Basically, it's the same issue that faced N while it was in draft form - classic chicken-and-egg.)

I didn't have to face that justification with the WNR3500, as Comcast (my ISP) supplied the router - the TV purchase, in fact, post-dates the router's arrival in the house by two years.

The gigabit support (wired PCs and Macs) is, in fact, the biggest reason I give for buying a new(er) router today, followed by (in order) support for multiple bands/SSIDs (at minimum, dual-band N support) followed by .ac support (in addition to - not instead of - dual-band N and gigabit wired support).

If you have recent (merely Vista-vintage, if not newer) PCs and Leopard or later Macs, the chances of your device NOT supporting wired gigabit are lower than the average January temperature in International Falls, MN - in degrees Farenheit.

Laptops and notebooks, along with MacBooks - Air or Pro - of similar vintage? N is a given.

.ac support? What devices support built-in .ac today? Is that support in addition to, or instead of N support?

.ac support is where draft N used to be - primarily a desire, and a pricey/expensive one. Don't overbuy.

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The issue *there* is why would you need the support for .ac now - if you have nothing that supports the protocol.

Why wouldn't I? I could get cards that supported the protocol for my existing equipment.

If I was buying today I'd get an AC router, because you almost never replace a working router...the cards can come later. Fortunately I'm not.

And yes, AC is on top of N, just like N is on top of everything else. 5ghz instead of 2.4 though.

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In case anyone cares, went with the Asus RT-N66U and put the Merlin firmware on it, has per device monitoring which is ACE!!! Loving the router so far, Time machine support isn't there, so that sucks. I still am using my airport extreme only for a time machine hub heh.

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Give Tomato a whirl on it, you'll love it

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Why wouldn't I? I could get cards that supported the protocol for my existing equipment.

If I was buying today I'd get an AC router, because you almost never replace a working router...the cards can come later. Fortunately I'm not.

And yes, AC is on top of N, just like N is on top of everything else. 5ghz instead of 2.4 though.

When it comes to wireless protocols, draft newer protocols are *pricier* than existing protocols - hence my referring to the checken-and-egg situation and the days of draft-N.

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