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Best 802.11n 5ghz router?


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#16 primexx

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 09:30

uh... anything that runs DD-WRT or TomatoUSB will do you fine.


#17 Squuiid

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 09:39

Another vote for the Netgear WNDR4500. Awesome router. If too expensive, get the WNDR4000.
ASUS are new to routers and their buggy firmware is still a problem IMO. While they look good on paper and speedtests, they have proven to not be very reliable.
I have never found Netgear to be any good until their WNDR3700/4000/4500 series. They really are excellent wireless routers.

#18 HawkMan

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 09:44

Tell you one thing, these routers are like 3x the size of the Airport, and all have stupid antennas sticking out. Is there anything that doesn't have any of those?


I believe I already mentioned Linksys.

#19 Axel

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:30

Is it not possible to change ISP? I'd be so p**sed if my ISP did that.

If you can get hold of a Cisco Linksys E4200 V1 (Broadcom, v. important) you can stick DD-WRT or another custom firmware on. I've found this to be rocksolid and can highly recommend it!

#20 +GreenMartian

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 12:20

Here's a screenshot from my ASUS RT-N16 running TomatoUSB+VPN.
Live stats per-device. There's also historical stats (daily & monthly).

Posted Image

Anything that can run custom firmware (as mentioned, the most popular ones being DD-WRT & Tomato) will give you infinitely more options than those that leave you at the mercy of the vendor firmware.

#21 Bray

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 01:57

I'd prefer go for Asus RT-N56U, a great router for the price

#22 PGHammer

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 02:14

I have the WNDR3700 and it's ok... it's just that the 5 GHz mode is pretty weak and it has to be reset occasionally to work properly. And of course sometimes when they updated firmware they introduced new or older problems.


That is why I like the option of third-party firmware (such as DD-WRT/OpenWRT/X-WRT - which HAS been known to support features factory firmware lacks).

Another vote for the Netgear WNDR4500. Awesome router. If too expensive, get the WNDR4000.
ASUS are new to routers and their buggy firmware is still a problem IMO. While they look good on paper and speedtests, they have proven to not be very reliable.
I have never found Netgear to be any good until their WNDR3700/4000/4500 series. They really are excellent wireless routers.


That is, in fact, why I recommend the WNDR3700 and its progeny; you aren't tied to factory firmware. Also, you can buy the Netgear routers brick and mortar (you aren't stuck buying online and thereby relying on online for support).

#23 Evolution

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 02:34

That is why I like the option of third-party firmware (such as DD-WRT/OpenWRT/X-WRT - which HAS been known to support features factory firmware lacks).



That is, in fact, why I recommend the WNDR3700 and its progeny; you aren't tied to factory firmware. Also, you can buy the Netgear routers brick and mortar (you aren't stuck buying online and thereby relying on online for support).


The DD-WRT version's range is worse... Right now I'm using OpenWRT and it's so far the best option.... but 5 GHz still isn't really an option.

#24 TPreston

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 02:39

Custom firmware or not for a little bit more you could get a referb/end-of-life enterprise access point like Aironet which will do all a consumer device an do and more multiple SSID's VLan SNMP automatic frequency selection etc

Same with switches once they go end of life their cost plummets, One generation old enterprise hardware will own any current gen consumer equipment.

#25 Kraftman

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 02:49

I have a Cisco/Linksys E3000 running TomatoUSB and it is phenomenal. Can't recommend it enough, seems like it would be perfect for you. I got it refurb from Newegg for $50 w/ free shipping.

#26 Bray

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 12:27

Check here

http://www.wirelessrouterhome.com/best-wireless-router-review/

#27 PGHammer

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 21:42

Another vote for the Netgear WNDR4500. Awesome router. If too expensive, get the WNDR4000.
ASUS are new to routers and their buggy firmware is still a problem IMO. While they look good on paper and speedtests, they have proven to not be very reliable.
I have never found Netgear to be any good until their WNDR3700/4000/4500 series. They really are excellent wireless routers.


I wouldn't count out the current (v4) iteration of the WNDR3700, either.

I just installed mine (replaced the WNR3500v1) this week (Thursday, in fact), and it is proving itself superior to every other router I've used or had experience with.

First off - they DID apparently fix the over-bright LED problem (it was an issue with older versions of both this router AND the WNR3500v1/v2/L) - the router no longer rivals my lit window case fan for brightest object in a dark room other than the display!

Second - IPv6 support is available; it's disabled by default, though. (The issue is ISP support - not support by the OSes; fortunately, Comcast supports IPv6 here, so I could enable in in the router's Advanced Setup. Therefore, every connection that supports IPv6 can *use* IPv6, which is the Windows 8 desktop [mine], the Windows 7 desktop in the library [Mom's} and even Mom's legacy laptop running XP SP3. Mom's smart TV all the way upstairs is on the completely-separate 5 GHz N band by its lonesome - no idea if it supports IPv6.)

Third - the connection speed (wired OR wireless) is fast. Sync-up speed - even over 100 mbps, rather than gigabit - is decidedly zippier than the WNR3500v1. (That is something that made no sense, as the older router ALSO had gigabit WAN/LAN; however, as it aged, I started having issues with connection timeouts - not just on Mom's PC in the library on the main floor, by my own desktop, which is less than a foot from the router via a wired connection. That means it was either the chipset, the router ports, or both.

Fourth - the still. inexpensive price - it's $90. (For once, Newegg and Best Buy have the same price; both undercut MicroCenter, which has the same router for $10 more. Amazon has the same price as Newegg and Best Buy.)

#28 PGHammer

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 21:49

The DD-WRT version's range is worse... Right now I'm using OpenWRT and it's so far the best option.... but 5 GHz still isn't really an option.


The v4 doesn't support DD-WRT (different/newer Atheros chipset than even the v3) - however, I had nary a problem setting up the 5 GHz network to use a different SSID (that is, in fact, the default with the v4 - no idea if that is the case with older versions). I have Mom's smart TV (the only 5 GHz supporting wireless device) on that network by itself (different SSID also equals different passphrase - makes for better intrusion detection, too), and it's two floors up. Connects better than it did to the WNR3500v1 it replaced (however, the older router had no 5 GHz support).

#29 TheExperiment

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 21:55

I definitely like the RT-N56U. But I'd go for an AC router if I was buying now.

#30 PGHammer

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 02:11

I definitely like the RT-N56U. But I'd go for an AC router if I was buying now.


The issue *there* is why would you need the support for .ac now - if you have nothing that supports the protocol. (Basically, it's the same issue that faced N while it was in draft form - classic chicken-and-egg.)

I didn't have to face that justification with the WNR3500, as Comcast (my ISP) supplied the router - the TV purchase, in fact, post-dates the router's arrival in the house by two years.

The gigabit support (wired PCs and Macs) is, in fact, the biggest reason I give for buying a new(er) router today, followed by (in order) support for multiple bands/SSIDs (at minimum, dual-band N support) followed by .ac support (in addition to - not instead of - dual-band N and gigabit wired support).

If you have recent (merely Vista-vintage, if not newer) PCs and Leopard or later Macs, the chances of your device NOT supporting wired gigabit are lower than the average January temperature in International Falls, MN - in degrees Farenheit.

Laptops and notebooks, along with MacBooks - Air or Pro - of similar vintage? N is a given.

.ac support? What devices support built-in .ac today? Is that support in addition to, or instead of N support?

.ac support is where draft N used to be - primarily a desire, and a pricey/expensive one. Don't overbuy.



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