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Mindovermaster

Linux, as a Whole

334 posts in this topic

SK[' timestamp=1357897557' post='595447084]

I tried Ubuntu again last night. My goal was to see if I could get GuildWars 2 running on it following a video posted on YouTube showing a 'how to'.

I fell at the first hurdle which was to install PlayOnLinux. The software is in the software centre but refuses to install due to dependencies I came across a post saying this is a x64 issue. After failing to get it working following forum posts I read I gave up and re-installed with a x86 install. It installed straight away.

I don't want to use a 32bit OS though so re-installed with x64 and will try again tonight to resolve the issue.

Sadly this though is the same story I have with Linux each time I try it. As much as its moved a hell of a lot over the years, and continues to do so I might add, it's still a ball ache for new comers to the OS when things don't work.

Ubuntu for me has done some amazing work for the Linux OS. For me all default desktop environments have been fugly. Ubuntu though is a decent looking OS out of the box. I can't say though I am happy with the Unity launcher and when you search for you installed apps it returns shopping results. To me this is simply another form of advertising.

Luckily the "shopping lense" is easily removed. sudo apt-get remove unity-lens-shopping. You can also totally turn off any online searches/results in the dash in the privacy settings in the control center.

And to be fair regarding the guild wars 2 thing its not technically a problem with linux, the game doesn't natively support linux so any way of getting it to work is basically a workaround, and that's why it gives headaches. if they had a native linux version I'm sure things would work much better.

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proprietary drivers usually don't work from repo either.

In my experience, proprietary drivers don't work in most cases, not just from the repos, but they are more likely to work from the repo because they have theoretically been vetted to work with the release. Still, I recommend against them in all but extreme circumstances. That said, as bad as it is installing a proprietary graphics driver from the repository, installing it directly from the binary on the manufacturer's website is even worse! I would never wish that fate on anyone.

That's not to say that all proprietary drivers are terrible in Linux. The proprietary Broadcom wireless driver, for example, implements some functionality needed for enterprise security solutions that the open-source driver does not. Unlike the proprietary AMD and NVIDIA graphics drivers, which one could argue similarly implement more functionality (more quickly, at least), the proprietary Broadcom wireless driver is very stable and has yet to break on any of the systems I have used it on.

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They work alright for most people. Of course you see people asking for help getting them to work on support forums. Can people please stop making silly claims?

Funny, but on thi forum alone, every person who's tried to install the proprietary nvidia drivers on ubuntu/Mint has ran into the missing GUI and needing workarounds issue. I've seen it on several computers, all in fact. So I kinda doubt it "works for most" people. I'd say most people never install the proprietary drivers, or they do the horrible workarounds to make them work.

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Video codecs? That's one I haven't heard anyone complain about in years, although I do remember Brian Lunduke ranting about it on the Linux Action Show. (I think it was during one of their Fedora reviews. He got very passionate during those.) In general, you can easily install restricted codecs from Debian Multimedia, Ubuntu Restricted Extras, or the equivalent sources for other distributions. Some distributions, like Linux Mint, even install restricted codecs by default. Personally, I've never had a problem with VLC or MPlayer not playing something, even without codecs from Debian Multimedia.

Although I am a custom codec/MPCHC user on Windows, VLC has been doing quite well for HD video playback for me. There are some higher bitrate videos that have some issues, but overall a great experience.

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Funny, but on thi forum alone, every person who's tried to install the proprietary nvidia drivers on ubuntu/Mint has ran into the missing GUI and needing workarounds issue.

Just my own experience of course, but I've not had issues with the proprietary nVidia drivers in the 'Buntus, just enabled it and went on my way. ATI on the other hand has given me nothing but trouble, but the boards I have fall into the legacy category now, and was in no mood to downgrade X to get it going, those boards were moved to Windows machines and replaced with nVidia boards.

As far as proprietary vs FOSS drivers go, again just my own experiences with my particular hardware, but found the proprietary drivers ran a fair bit faster, especially for ATI. A few benchmarks (Phoronix, etc) show a pretty hefty difference as well.

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Funny, but on thi forum alone, every person who's tried to install the proprietary nvidia drivers on ubuntu/Mint has ran into the missing GUI and needing workarounds issue. I've seen it on several computers, all in fact. So I kinda doubt it "works for most" people. I'd say most people never install the proprietary drivers, or they do the horrible workarounds to make them work.

I haven't looked at all those threads, but at least a few of the cases I saw were PEBKAC lol (trying to install the .run file from nvidia/ati instead of using the more reliable solution of using the included automated installer). My old laptop had an AMD card and I was always able to enable it via ubuntu's driver installer. I do agree that the proprietary drivers definitely aren't perfect and tend to be more problematic than the OSS drivers (I chose to go intel on my current laptop so I wouldn't have to deal with them), but I wouldn't say that they just don't work at all for most people based on some forum posts.

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I've exclusively installed them from repo, and they've without fail, failed.

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I've exclusively installed them from repo, and they've without fail, failed.

Looks like we can blame canonical for this. Apparently the proprietary drivers inexplicably failing when installed using jockey or additional drivers is a somewhat recently introduced ubuntu bug, and the driver installer used to work fine (link also shows how to get the repo drivers working): http://www.dedoimedo...zal-nvidia.html

EDIT: here's the relevent bug(s) for the proprietary drivers failing to install https://bugs.launchp...es/+bug/1068341, https://bugs.launchp...ty/+bug/1070427. Hopefully they get this sorted out soon because it does certainly give a bad impression, and is a pretty bug regression.

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Linux only works if your among the happy few with properly supported hardware. Outside that its only good/decent use is to use them as servers.

Windows surely has its issues, but Ubuntu for example has quite some issues as well. (I'm more of a Debian fan though). However Ubuntu does push Linux development in a positive aspect, although I'm not a fan of them using Debian Sid packages as their 'stable' packages. And is IMO where most of the issues come from.

Other then that, as long as your within the hardware range of their support. Its a great substitute for Windows.

I tried Ubuntu again last night. My goal was to see if I could get GuildWars 2 running on it following a video posted on YouTube showing a 'how to'.

I fell at the first hurdle which was to install PlayOnLinux. The software is in the software centre but refuses to install due to dependencies I came across a post saying this is a x64 issue. After failing to get it working following forum posts I read I gave up and re-installed with a x86 install. It installed straight away.

I don't want to use a 32bit OS though so re-installed with x64 and will try again tonight to resolve the issue.

Sadly this though is the same story I have with Linux each time I try it. As much as its moved a hell of a lot over the years, and continues to do so I might add, it's still a ball ache for new comers to the OS when things don't work.

Ubuntu for me has done some amazing work for the Linux OS. For me all default desktop environments have been fugly. Ubuntu though is a decent looking OS out of the box. I can't say though I am happy with the Unity launcher and when you search for you installed apps it returns shopping results. To me this is simply another form of advertising.

Sounds like you need to install the 32bit dependencies on the 64bit install. Like Windows, Linux can do both 32bit fully under 64bit. However most distros do not come with these 32bit dependencies by default.

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