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Fridge, whats more efficient, fully stocked or just what you need.


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#16 vetneufuse

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 00:34

Actually, a fridge, uses EXTREMELY little energy, provided you don't keep the door open. but among the electric goods in your house, the fridge uses least of all most likely.

the amount of food in the fridge doesn't matter, as the OP sort of figured out in his original reasoning, it'll use the same amount of energy, just either take longer between using the compressor or using it shorter for more often. but even this won't matter much.

The only thing you have to check, and this has nothing to do with energy use is that you don't put hot food in the fridge. the reason for this is that it increases the temperature in the fridge, won't really affect energy use, but you shouldn't increase the temp it causes food to go bad faster and condensation. some fridges allows you to lower the temperature two r so degrees before putting in food. But this button has to be pressed well in advance of actually putting in food. (Think the day before when you know you're going to the store to buy food for the whole month). Freezers often also have this setting and allows you to press the freeze in button the day before shopping, and will lower the temperature from -18 to -22 to -24 freezing the food faster and reducing/preventing the temperature increase in the freezer.

But for anyone who wants to save energy, the Fridge, freezer and dishwasher are the least of your problem, the one thing that costs you most energy in your house, hot water. (provided you're the one providing the power to the water heater.


I just picked a random energy star rated fridge from lowes... averages 448 KW/h a year.. that's about on average $60 to run... that's an efficient one... a non energy star one now 890 KW/h.... I don't care if it "uses less then everything else in your house" it still adds up.... 500 KW/h less a year is still $60 a year I don't have to spend on electric :) but the reason I used this example, is because how stocked the fridge is really does not matter, it's how efficient the compressor is and how much its opened


#17 *RedBull*

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 00:43

That's what I say too. A fridge has a sensor and the compressor kicks in when the temp reading is above the set temp. Less things in there should mean less run time, and therefore it should be more efficient.


I agree with this. Cause it works for a freezer. Fill the freezer so it holds the cold longer. put more in a cooler to keep things cooler longer. Why would you put less ice in a cooler? ;)

#18 HawkMan

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 00:46

you americans and your oversized crazy fridges.

anyway the amount of stuff in the fridge won't affect the energy used. we don't use energy star over there though, they're all marked with the new EU energy rating, and all fridges are A nowadays meaning they had to ad A+, A++, and A+++

Looking at a fairly big (180tall, 350 liter) pure fridge, with an A+ rating. It uses about 139 KWh a year,

a similar A++ Samsungs (180, 350L) uses 118, effectively over the year there's no difference. besides anyone who buys Samsung white goods will be tearing their hair out for other reasons than power bills anyway.

I can't even imagine a fridge using 450 KWh a year, much less almost 900. That must be some American made stuff, using same technology you use to make engines, whole lot of liter, not a lot of horsepower :p

Just to get the 450 value to make any sense I would have to imagine an oversize two door fridge. Which will use a lot more energy since the energy marking will usually count an opening as opening both doors, and even if you open just one, the double ones are horribly inefficient in that the inside temperature goes down a lot more. you'd be far better of with two single fridges side by side.

seriously... how is 890 even possible... heck I can't even get 450 to make sense....

I agree with this. Cause it works for a freezer. Fill the freezer so it holds the cold longer. put more in a cooler to keep things cooler longer. Why would you put less ice in a cooler? ;)


Doesn't matter the net energy usage is the same.
More stuff in the freezer, means longer time for the compressor to stay one, and longer between each time it goes one.
Less stuff in the freezer means faster to cool down, but also shroter times between on periods.

in the end the net result is the same, just 1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1=8 instead of 4+4=8.

#19 siah1214

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 00:48

I think it's a better question to ask: will you eat all the food you have in your refrigerator before it goes bad? That's why me and my wife keep only what we'll eat over the next few days so nothing goes bad. Makes the fridge look pretty empty, but oh well.

#20 vetneufuse

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 01:27

you americans and your oversized crazy fridges.

anyway the amount of stuff in the fridge won't affect the energy used. we don't use energy star over there though, they're all marked with the new EU energy rating, and all fridges are A nowadays meaning they had to ad A+, A++, and A+++

Looking at a fairly big (180tall, 350 liter) pure fridge, with an A+ rating. It uses about 139 KWh a year,

a similar A++ Samsungs (180, 350L) uses 118, effectively over the year there's no difference. besides anyone who buys Samsung white goods will be tearing their hair out for other reasons than power bills anyway.

I can't even imagine a fridge using 450 KWh a year, much less almost 900. That must be some American made stuff, using same technology you use to make engines, whole lot of liter, not a lot of horsepower :p

Just to get the 450 value to make any sense I would have to imagine an oversize two door fridge. Which will use a lot more energy since the energy marking will usually count an opening as opening both doors, and even if you open just one, the double ones are horribly inefficient in that the inside temperature goes down a lot more. you'd be far better of with two single fridges side by side.

seriously... how is 890 even possible... heck I can't even get 450 to make sense....



Doesn't matter the net energy usage is the same.
More stuff in the freezer, means longer time for the compressor to stay one, and longer between each time it goes one.
Less stuff in the freezer means faster to cool down, but also shroter times between on periods.

in the end the net result is the same, just 1+1+1+1+1+1+1+1=8 instead of 4+4=8.


Didn't know LG and Samsung was american made, so, yeah attempt to troll america = fail...

please show me a fridge that is standard size in the USA below 400 KW/h? Heck most of the normal fridges I've looked up for European areas are not too different in size or wattage, only difference is a lot of them run on 220v instead of 110v

heck this small 4.4 cubic ft firge still uses 274 KW/h on average in a year

http://www.lowes.com...r%7C1=

and that is a whole 4.4 cu ft small one! I think your idea of how much electric a firdge uses is a little skewed

I just looked up the same LG one I looked up for the USA at 450 watts, the UK version uses a whole......461 watts and is rated A+ and that was 352 cu liter

#21 Hum

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 01:32

I read years ago, that your should keep the freezer section full, and the fridge part, as just what you need.

This saves energy. ;)

#22 threetonesun

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 01:35

For the refrigerator, I don't know that you would see a difference in terms of electricity either way, or I should say, it depends on the refrigerator. For the freezer, yeah, fill it up, it'll keep it colder, and should you lose power, the food will keep longer.

#23 HawkMan

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 01:40

and that is a whole 4.4 cu ft small one! I think your idea of how much electric a firdge uses is a little skewed


Except I sell them as part of my job, an as I demonstrated above a 180 tall 350L fridge, is from 140 KWh a year. 400+ is just ridiculous.

I looked up a cheap ass Beko (cheap crap store brand). that is a double wide with freezer. it's listed at 455KWh a year. BUT the bottom of this is a freezer so it'll use a lot more of course, and it'll lose almost twice as much energy because it's a double door fridge and freezer. and because the way euro energy marking is done, both doors have to be opened when measuring energy usage (they're opened a certain amount of times per day, equal to the average amount of times a family would open the fridge) which would let in a lot more hot air than opening just one which any sensible person at home would. you can pretty much assume that 75% of those 455KWh is the freezer though.

And while I would never buy any Samsung white goods myself, some of their fridges actually have a clever solution with a bar door. A small "flap" door that you can open to get stuff form the middle shelf, like milk or drinks or anything really, this would pretty much reduce your energy usage by a significant amount as it would allow you to lose far less energy when getting stuff for lunch or stuff like that.

lesson learnt from this, if you want to save money on your fridge, don't keep the door open. put however much or little in it as you want, keep it at 4C. but don't keep the door open more than you have to.

Either way, I don't see any reasonable way pure ridge would use even half of 400 KWh a year.

Also don't argue the energy usage with a European since Europe has REALLY strict rules about the energy usage, we're not even allowed to sell white good below a certain energy grade, and at store ALL white good must be marked with the euro standard energy markings, which lists all the energy usage and vital details of the product.

#24 vetneufuse

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 01:46

Except I sell them as part of my job, an as I demonstrated above a 180 tall 350L fridge, is from 140 KWh a year. 400+ is just ridiculous.


give me model numbers, because I want to see what is out there, everything I've looked up is similar to the USA models

#25 HawkMan

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 02:23

Samsung Twin RR82FESW1 - Class A+ 139KWh
Samsung Twin RR82HFBC - Class A++ 112KWh

Beko GNE114612W - 455KWh, combined dual door fridge and freezer, this one is high because of dual doors and mostly the freezer part.

and some high quality stuff to compare
http://www.miele.no/...20_SD-50384.htm
390L, 155KWh, Energy class A+

#26 vetneufuse

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 02:45

Samsung Twin RR82FESW1 - Class A+ 139KWh
Samsung Twin RR82HFBC - Class A++ 112KWh

Beko GNE114612W - 455KWh, combined dual door fridge and freezer, this one is high because of dual doors and mostly the freezer part.

and some high quality stuff to compare
http://www.miele.no/...20_SD-50384.htm
390L, 155KWh, Energy class A+


yes, but that is just a fridge, if you are going to compare to what the USA has standard, which is a fridge / freezer combo you need to add on a standalone freezer also...

so say you have a Samsung Twin RR82FDMG1 - at 143KWh then add on a freezer at the same height (just to be equivilent of a USA fridge, which has both almost always) add on a Samsung RZ80FBBB Upright Freezer Freestanding at 327 Kwh.. we are once again at 470 KWh... same efficiency as a samsung fridge in the USA ... seperate is no more efficient then combined

#27 HawkMan

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 03:34

a fridge/freezer combo is not the same as a fridge. that's a fridge freezer combo.

And if you get a A++ version of the Samsung's then it's 112+255= 367, still 100 less than yours and there are A+++ models to. But the differences are minimal. And over here we pretty much equal 1KWh per year to 1NOK. meaning these would cost less than 400 NOK per year to run. but at current power prices it's less than half that (and this is the highest it's been all year)

Either way, it's so little over a year it's not where you're saving money.

want to save money then
- use less hot water
- short showers, turn off the water when soaping
- use energy efficient heating like heat pumps.
- close the fridge and freezer doors as fast as possible, set freeze in mode on the freezer the day before big shopping(or manually turn it down to -24)
- Use the dishwasher, don't hand dish. and don't rinse plates before putting in dish washer(especially don't rinse with hot water, both because you're wasting hot water, and because you're making any egg based food/sauce stick to the plate so it won't go away)
- hang clothes for drying instead of dryer. and use low temp and quick program when possible.


Personally, power is cheap, and I have power at spot price(meaning I get the lowest current price and it changes immediately when the power company has to change), so my power bill varies from as low as under 1200NOK in summer when the power is at it's cheapest and no heating is on, to at worst with the most expensive power and heating in winter it was up to 2500NOK last year, I think I've barely topped 2000 on a month this winter so far but it's been a generally mild winter. Basically everything here is one, form computers to consoles.

#28 vetneufuse

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 03:42

a fridge/freezer combo is not the same as a fridge. that's a fridge freezer combo.

And if you get a A++ version of the Samsung's then it's 112+255= 367, still 100 less than yours and there are A+++ models to. But the differences are minimal. And over here we pretty much equal 1KWh per year to 1NOK. meaning these would cost less than 400 NOK per year to run. but at current power prices it's less than half that (and this is the highest it's been all year)

Either way, it's so little over a year it's not where you're saving money.

want to save money then
- use less hot water
- short showers, turn off the water when soaping
- use energy efficient heating like heat pumps.
- close the fridge and freezer doors as fast as possible, set freeze in mode on the freezer the day before big shopping(or manually turn it down to -24)
- Use the dishwasher, don't hand dish. and don't rinse plates before putting in dish washer(especially don't rinse with hot water, both because you're wasting hot water, and because you're making any egg based food/sauce stick to the plate so it won't go away)
- hang clothes for drying instead of dryer. and use low temp and quick program when possible.




Personally, power is cheap, and I have power at spot price(meaning I get the lowest current price and it changes immediately when the power company has to change), so my power bill varies from as low as under 1200NOK in summer when the power is at it's cheapest and no heating is on, to at worst with the most expensive power and heating in winter it was up to 2500NOK last year, I think I've barely topped 2000 on a month this winter so far but it's been a generally mild winter. Basically everything here is one, form computers to consoles.


In the USA we call a combo still a refigerator because its standard to have a freezer in the fridge... only when it's a "standalone fridge" do we state that or a "Standalone freezer" else it's a fridge (a combo)...that's just how it's always been... just look at this page... http://www.lowes.com.../_/N-1z11pmd/pc notice, everything is called a refigerator...

#29 remixedcat

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 07:35

STOCKED FULL OF MEAT AND DRANK!!!

#30 tiagosilva29

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 08:57

My fridge is fully stocked because you never know when zombies are g