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Fridge, whats more efficient, fully stocked or just what you need.


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#46 Detection

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 16:16

ah, not the most efficiient PSU and a power hungry CPU... your PSU is less then 90% efficient, I switched all my PSU's to Kingwins, drastically more efficient, don't even need fans because they run so cool due to the efficinecy


Never heard of Kingwins before, I just assumed my power usage was pretty standard for a decent spec PC, might look into a better PSU at some point if it will make such a big difference

Would be nice to not spend most of my spare cash on electrickery :)


#47 vetneufuse

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 16:25

Never heard of Kingwins before, I just assumed my power usage was pretty standard for a decent spec PC, might look into a better PSU at some point if it will make such a big difference

Would be nice to not spend most of my spare cash on electrickery :)


They are mfg really nice, the modular ones work great. My old X58 i7 used 250 watts idle, when I researches ivy bridge I went with the most efficient parts I could buy and my idle wattage is 35 watts, maxes out at 90 watts when running at 100% and full GPU usage...

#48 Detection

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 16:32

They are mfg really nice, the modular ones work great. My old X58 i7 used 250 watts idle, when I researches ivy bridge I went with the most efficient parts I could buy and my idle wattage is 35 watts, maxes out at 90 watts when running at 100% and full GPU usage...


I don't have any way to measure what mine pulls, but 90w would be very nice, I have higher rated lightbulbs lol (actually they are in a draw, I try to save where I can and use energy saving bulbs everywhere)

I do fancy a modular PSU next anyway so good excuse to upgrade, this TX950 puts Medusa to shame

Thanks for the tip, goes to show there is always more to learn with PCs :)

#49 CJ33

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Posted 30 December 2012 - 16:51

If you are not counting the initial energy required to cool down the items you place in a fridge, then I say it more efficient for a full fridge.

To make a crude generalization, The heat transfer is largely absorbed by the fridge via convection (as opposed to conduction or radiation), the heat transfer is given by

q=hA(ΔT) where h is the heat transfer coefficient, A is the surface area of the body, and ΔT is the temperature difference between the body and its surrounding. Now the only thing that will be a variable between these two situations will be the heat transfer coefficient h.

A fridge full of stuff is more likely to transfer heat into the fridge via conduction and convection.
A fridge empty is more likely to transfer a significant portion of heat in via convection (cuz its empty) and some conduction (dont forget the metal and glass innards of the fridge).

Before a heat transfer analysis becomes overly complex, I will just cut to the chase.

A fridge full of stuff will stay colder longer because you have to deal with the fridge slowly heating the inner edge of the fridge first. After that, consider the mass of air (empty fridge) vs the mass of solids and liquids (full fridge). The heat transfer between the fridge and an empty inside will be a quicker process because the mass of air is significantly smaller than the mass of the solids and liquids, thus heating up more quickly.

I'm gonna end it here, but you can see where the analysis of this situation is headed. Become a mechanical engineer if this type of problem piques your interest and specialize in heat transfer.



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