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pes2013

Gasoline or diesel?

39 posts in this topic

Breach has already mentioned it... but one key word on modern diesels - DPF. Removes just about all the soot from the exhaust - so no black smoke. And he's also mentioned that about the priming pump too. Easy enough to do at the roadside (same case on my 8 year old Citroen!).

In Europe, diesel engines are extremely refined and quiet. A modern 2.0L engine will develop around 150-160bhp easily (probably more) with a huge amount of torque to back it up. That combination makes for a brilliant motorway drive.

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That was a little unfair Hum, you're talking about a huge engine workhorse, diesel cars have miniscule engines compared to semis, artics, tractor trailers, and if well maintained, they can be clean, no engine is perfectly clean, and I do agree with you that diesel is a dirty fuel.

Many decades ago, there used to be petrol, or gas engined artics, used to go through gallons of fuel per mile.

I'm not trying to change your mind, and to be honest, My post wasn't supposed to defend diesels as much as it has, but any engine, as long as it's well maintained pollutes less.

I understand a car may pollute less -- just that those big trucks make me think strongly of bad air. ;)

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The only problem with the DPF is that you need to drive your car regularly at high speeds for some distance so that the DPF gets hot enough to burn all the soot inside. Few if any dealers actually tell you that and there are ton of clueless diesel car drivers who wonder what's wrong with their car when they've been doing 2 km home<>office drives for the last 6 months. I also think the DPF has to be replaced eventually (read - years) and it costs something in the 500-1000 EUR range (guesstimate - depending on brand and model).

Not a problem for the OP though.

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Diesel "pollutes" less, insofar as gases and environmental stuff. BUT. they do pollute more as far as particles go. in some cities in Norway they have had periods where only half the diesel owners will be allowed each die when there's high particle density(actually both diesels and cars with studded tires). The problem is a lot less now though and there has not been any such situations this year.

But I'd go diesel, cheaper, lasts longer, and more fun to drive, especially turbo diesel.

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Everyone goes with diesel huh...

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Everyone goes with diesel huh...

It's an option, tho I have defended diesel engines in this thread, you do have choices, any small (1.6 or smaller) can be economical, my Omega's a V6, so I have to drive with a REALLY light foot if I want any returns on gas mileage, even then I'm lucky if I realistically get more than 26 miles to the gallon, on motorways or highways where the car is better suited I have had more.

But if it's city driving, it drowns it's sorrows. For your OP I'd recommend anything with a small engine, be it petrol or diesel, and with a manual or stick shift gearbox, the savings in fuel in a manual is slight but it all adds up. I'm only thinking diesel for myself because I realistically need a minivan or people carrier, and a car that heavy will be better suited for me at least in a diesel. :)

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Working in a workshop, I'd go petrol. When something breaks on a diesel. Lol. Hope you've got savings

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I only suggested it because Diesel engines can't just be fed new fuel and started again (Not the last time I checked anyway) they needed bleeding to get the air out of the lines etc before they would start again, which although I know about that, would not really know where to start to actually do that

Petrols are happy to just be turned over a few times until they receive fuel again :)

Vauxhall's can. my neighbour's son bought an Astra, he's 18, he ran out, turns out more car makers are introducing some sort or self bleeding for the fuel system.

on his car I could not find the bleed pump anywhere, felt a little stupid when I called my local Vauxhall dealer and asked where it was and he told me His model astra doesn't come with one.

It's an option, tho I have defended diesel engines in this thread, you do have choices, any small (1.6 or smaller) can be economical, my Omega's a V6, so I have to drive with a REALLY light foot if I want any returns on gas mileage, even then I'm lucky if I realistically get no more than 26 miles to the gallon, on motorways or highways where the car is better suited I have had more.

But if it's city driving, it drowns it's sorrows. For your OP I'd recommend anything with a small engine, be it petrol or diesel, and with a manual or stick shift gearbox, the savings in fuel in a manual is slight but it all adds up. I'm only thinking diesel for myself because I realistically need a minivan or people carrier, and a car that heavy will be better suited for me at least in a diesel. :)

EDIT,

Missed out the part that I reposted in bold

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Vauxhall's can. my neighbour's son bought an Astra, he's 18, he ran out, turns out more car makers are introducing some sort or self bleeding for the fuel system.

on his car I could not find the bleed pump anywhere, felt a little stupid when I called my local Vauxhall dealer and asked where it was and he told me His model astra doesn't come with one.

Just about to reply and Lightning / Power cut

Snowing while thundering again, weird

Its been ages since I messed around with cars so Im only going by things I learned when I was younger, good to know :)

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Working in a workshop, I'd go petrol. When something breaks on a diesel. Lol. Hope you've got savings

He's in Europe so he has excellent warranty so that wouldn't be a problem. and as a client of workshops. workshop prices doesn't matter much, not on modern cars anyway, buying old used Opels/Vauxhalls yeah, they break a lot and cost an arm and a leg to fix. newer ones or other brands like Toyota however last forever and are fairly cheap to fix, no more expensive than the petrol ones anyway, which can be expensive enough depending on the issue.

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As you are in Europe - I'd go with something with a 2.0 litre diesel engine. Expect 50-55ish mpg on a run. Or at the extreme end, go for something around the 1.5 litre mark and expect 60-70mpg but a noticable reduction in power and torque.

If you can - get something with 6 gears , makes all the difference on a motorway/highway.

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I do 112km daily just purely for work and most of it is on the highway. I would suggest you go for diesel. I have a 2 litre engine and 33 litres of diesel lasts me about 350-380 miles. Thats around 563km-611km. With petrol yes its cheaper but you wont get the same mileage out of it.

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He's in Europe so he has excellent warranty so that wouldn't be a problem. and as a client of workshops. workshop prices doesn't matter much, not on modern cars anyway, buying old used Opels/Vauxhalls yeah, they break a lot and cost an arm and a leg to fix. newer ones or other brands like Toyota however last forever and are fairly cheap to fix, no more expensive than the petrol ones anyway, which can be expensive enough depending on the issue.

Baaaahahahahahahahaha.

You think I'd be making money if that were the case. We make our money out of Euro cars, because they cost an arm and a leg to repair. And I assure you, they break down.

Toyota can't be compared alongside Euro cars. Japan > Euro cars.

If you must go Euro, VW or Audi is it. The rest are a load of rubbish.

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I never said euro cars, I don't buy euro cars. however. "IN" Europe, the consumer protection laws here make sure that all our repairs are free for a varying amount of years depending on country,Norway is among the ones with the strongest laws and 5 years reclamation period, though I'm not sure, but Cars may actually have longer reclamation periods, however, Cars are easier in that they are a lot easier to separate reclamation and warranty jobs on. We're also getting a lot of cars giving up to 7 years warranty now. though different manufacturers have different "hidden" text meaning in effect you only have that 7 years on very minor stuff on the expensive euro cars.

So yeah, I'd never buy a euro car, well I could consider it if I was loaded, but I do appreciate the extra consumer protection I get by being in europe.

However being that the outside temperature lately have been between -24 to -30, I'm kinda glad I have a Toyota petrol, it starts even when I forget the engine heater. though all Diesels sold here either come with pre heaters or webasto's or whatever they all use, or the buyer quickly learns to install one when winter arrives, usually before, and usually only on self imports.

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