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Gasoline or diesel?


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#31 Aheer.R.S.

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:26

Everyone goes with diesel huh...

It's an option, tho I have defended diesel engines in this thread, you do have choices, any small (1.6 or smaller) can be economical, my Omega's a V6, so I have to drive with a REALLY light foot if I want any returns on gas mileage, even then I'm lucky if I realistically get more than 26 miles to the gallon, on motorways or highways where the car is better suited I have had more.
But if it's city driving, it drowns it's sorrows. For your OP I'd recommend anything with a small engine, be it petrol or diesel, and with a manual or stick shift gearbox, the savings in fuel in a manual is slight but it all adds up. I'm only thinking diesel for myself because I realistically need a minivan or people carrier, and a car that heavy will be better suited for me at least in a diesel. :)


#32 Nashy

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 09:49

Working in a workshop, I'd go petrol. When something breaks on a diesel. Lol. Hope you've got savings

#33 Aheer.R.S.

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:54

I only suggested it because Diesel engines can't just be fed new fuel and started again (Not the last time I checked anyway) they needed bleeding to get the air out of the lines etc before they would start again, which although I know about that, would not really know where to start to actually do that

Petrols are happy to just be turned over a few times until they receive fuel again :)

Vauxhall's can. my neighbour's son bought an Astra, he's 18, he ran out, turns out more car makers are introducing some sort or self bleeding for the fuel system.
on his car I could not find the bleed pump anywhere, felt a little stupid when I called my local Vauxhall dealer and asked where it was and he told me His model astra doesn't come with one.


It's an option, tho I have defended diesel engines in this thread, you do have choices, any small (1.6 or smaller) can be economical, my Omega's a V6, so I have to drive with a REALLY light foot if I want any returns on gas mileage, even then I'm lucky if I realistically get no more than 26 miles to the gallon, on motorways or highways where the car is better suited I have had more.
But if it's city driving, it drowns it's sorrows. For your OP I'd recommend anything with a small engine, be it petrol or diesel, and with a manual or stick shift gearbox, the savings in fuel in a manual is slight but it all adds up. I'm only thinking diesel for myself because I realistically need a minivan or people carrier, and a car that heavy will be better suited for me at least in a diesel. :)

EDIT,
Missed out the part that I reposted in bold

#34 Detection

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 12:03

Vauxhall's can. my neighbour's son bought an Astra, he's 18, he ran out, turns out more car makers are introducing some sort or self bleeding for the fuel system.
on his car I could not find the bleed pump anywhere, felt a little stupid when I called my local Vauxhall dealer and asked where it was and he told me His model astra doesn't come with one.


Just about to reply and Lightning / Power cut

Snowing while thundering again, weird

Its been ages since I messed around with cars so Im only going by things I learned when I was younger, good to know :)

#35 HawkMan

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 12:04

Working in a workshop, I'd go petrol. When something breaks on a diesel. Lol. Hope you've got savings


He's in Europe so he has excellent warranty so that wouldn't be a problem. and as a client of workshops. workshop prices doesn't matter much, not on modern cars anyway, buying old used Opels/Vauxhalls yeah, they break a lot and cost an arm and a leg to fix. newer ones or other brands like Toyota however last forever and are fairly cheap to fix, no more expensive than the petrol ones anyway, which can be expensive enough depending on the issue.

#36 watkinsx2

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 12:21

As you are in Europe - I'd go with something with a 2.0 litre diesel engine. Expect 50-55ish mpg on a run. Or at the extreme end, go for something around the 1.5 litre mark and expect 60-70mpg but a noticable reduction in power and torque.

If you can - get something with 6 gears , makes all the difference on a motorway/highway.

#37 Soldiers33

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 12:25

I do 112km daily just purely for work and most of it is on the highway. I would suggest you go for diesel. I have a 2 litre engine and 33 litres of diesel lasts me about 350-380 miles. Thats around 563km-611km. With petrol yes its cheaper but you wont get the same mileage out of it.

#38 Nashy

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 23:19

He's in Europe so he has excellent warranty so that wouldn't be a problem. and as a client of workshops. workshop prices doesn't matter much, not on modern cars anyway, buying old used Opels/Vauxhalls yeah, they break a lot and cost an arm and a leg to fix. newer ones or other brands like Toyota however last forever and are fairly cheap to fix, no more expensive than the petrol ones anyway, which can be expensive enough depending on the issue.


Baaaahahahahahahahaha.

You think I'd be making money if that were the case. We make our money out of Euro cars, because they cost an arm and a leg to repair. And I assure you, they break down.

Toyota can't be compared alongside Euro cars. Japan > Euro cars.

If you must go Euro, VW or Audi is it. The rest are a load of rubbish.

#39 HawkMan

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 01:41

I never said euro cars, I don't buy euro cars. however. "IN" Europe, the consumer protection laws here make sure that all our repairs are free for a varying amount of years depending on country,Norway is among the ones with the strongest laws and 5 years reclamation period, though I'm not sure, but Cars may actually have longer reclamation periods, however, Cars are easier in that they are a lot easier to separate reclamation and warranty jobs on. We're also getting a lot of cars giving up to 7 years warranty now. though different manufacturers have different "hidden" text meaning in effect you only have that 7 years on very minor stuff on the expensive euro cars.

So yeah, I'd never buy a euro car, well I could consider it if I was loaded, but I do appreciate the extra consumer protection I get by being in europe.

However being that the outside temperature lately have been between -24 to -30, I'm kinda glad I have a Toyota petrol, it starts even when I forget the engine heater. though all Diesels sold here either come with pre heaters or webasto's or whatever they all use, or the buyer quickly learns to install one when winter arrives, usually before, and usually only on self imports.