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Steam on Linux - Disappointing

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#46 @Leo

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 23:45

Don't you get the meaning of BETA?

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That was the worst tenso ever. :rolleyes:


#47 redvamp128

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 00:17

What you're implying is that Valve expect people will switch to Linux just to game, when the overall goal is to merely blur the gaming line between the operating systems. Only the bandwagony types will switch right away for the sake of Gabe's enthusiasm. What Valve needs to do right now is attract those of the Steam userbase that already like to use Linux on a regular basis.

See, it's more about statistics right now than anything. Anybody playing TF2 on Windows now will likely not switch to Linux just to play TF2, but with some nice steam statistics and a streamlined approach to releasing on the third platform, developers might open their minds a little bit to the idea.

As it stands, Arch Linux is the largest group of Steam Linux users. Valve will follow suit.


Actually probably their logic is as follows:

Ubuntu is maintained by Canonical which also is an ENTRY (casual) level Linux unlike Arch that is more suited to the person who wants to install and configure it the way they want it.
Canonical also is heavy into the support of Debian.

Start out with support for the simple linux user then fork it out for others.

https://wiki.archlin....php/Arch_Linux



Arch Linux





Arch Linux is an independently developed, i686/x86-64 general purpose GNU/Linux distribution versatile enough to suit any role. Development focuses on simplicity, minimalism, and code elegance. Arch is installed as a minimal base system, configured by the user upon which their own ideal environment is assembled by installing only what is required or desired for their unique purposes. GUI configuration utilities are not officially provided, and most system configuration is performed from the shell and a text editor. Based on a rolling-release model, Arch strives to stay bleeding edge, and typically offers the latest stable versions of most software.





Which the entry level user just wants to -- Click on the .deb file and the OS automatically grabs what it needs. (Unlike with Arch where you may have to manually install the needed libraries.)

Don't get me wrong- I have used Arch and it is great but for the beginner Ubuntu is the easier start for a new user.

that is probably why they started with Ubuntu.

That and Ubuntu is supported by a company unlike Arch which is User / Community driven/based.
(which means there is someone to contact when their product stops working to help to fix it and get the fix out to the masses unlike the other where they may have to wait on the Community of users to work on the fix)

(I am sure you will argue that- which I can understand your point about more Arch users would want it, but that was probably their logic as to why UBUNTU)

#48 Descartes

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 00:22

Since it's a beta, I'm pretty sure they'd be delighted to hear your feedback, if you send it to the right place. That's what betas are for, after all ;)

And Arch for a Linux newbie? Perfectly fine for a willing to learn newbie. Would be catastrophic for a clueless one, though :p

#49 Pong

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 04:04

The Distro "wars" is probably a large part of why it's taken Valve this long to bring Steam to Linux.

Frankly, if you're willing to go through the relative hassle of installing Arch, but hate having to do a little work to get the Steam Beta installed, then I have no idea what possessed you to install Arch in the first place.

#50 TurboShrimp

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 04:22

Disclaimer: This is basically a rant thread.

So I've been using the Steam Linux beta for a few weeks now, and I've come to following conclusion: The Steam Linux beta sucks.

It's not like I don't appreciate what they're doing, I mean after all, Valve are the only publisher that's really taking Linux (except they're not, I'll discuss that later), but still, the execution of the whole thing is farcical.

First of all, why is the client 32-bit only? I honestly can't remember that last time a Linux application came with only a 32-bit binary. This decision means that everyone on an x64 Linux build has to install 32-bit libraries in order to run Steam. Why not just provide a 64-bit binary and save us the bloat of having to install multilib libraries purely for Steam? I can't imagine that the difference between x86 and x64 would be so much that it'd be impossible to develop both at the same time.

Second, what's with the auto-update process? Most Linux distros have pretty solid package management. So why not just leave it to the package managers? This problem is SOLVED in Linux. Why use some [****-poor] auto-update process when mature platforms already exist for exactly this problem?

Third, why does the client feel compelled to screw with my cursor. This is probably a problem with my setup rather than Steam, but it's the only app on my system that insists on reversing my mouse cursor. Oddness.

Fourth, and probably most importantly, where's the quality control in the games? Of all the games that are "available for Linux", in my experience about 50% are 'private betas' that need a password to play or simply don't install. To make things worse, it doesn't actually tell you that when you buy the game, so you are at risk of buying a game you can't actually play. The funniest thing I find about this is that a lot of the games that don't work are also former Humble Bundle games, so I can play the game perfectly well without Steam, but then can't play the Steam version of the same game. What the hell is up with that?

This inconvenience is compounded by failures like, for example, SpaceChem trying to use apt to try and install dependencies on my Arch install (for those that don't know, that doesn't work), and including libraries that don't work on 64-bit installs. There are threads with distro-specific hacks to get games working, but why isn't Steam doing this for us? I don't expect them to cater to every OS, but they could at least give us some hints. Make the developers provide a list of dependencies, and then check against installed libraries to determine which ones I need to install to get a game to work, and then tell me.

The games overall seem to be the 32-bit versions of the games (which I guess makes sense since the client is too), so I'm installing a lot of 32-bit libs for all the games too. It's gradually turning my Arch install into a glorious mess of libraries. Not really an issue per se, but an annoyance for someone like me who tries to keep a minimal install as much as possible.

I don't know, I guess this beta is giving me a bit of a bitter after-taste. They're touting it as the "Steam Linux beta", when in reality it should just be the "Steam Ubuntu Beta" since non-Ubuntu user's are pretty much out there on our own hacking it together to get it to work.

Overall, I'm finding more success playing games outside of Steam than I am within it. One of the best things about the Windows client is the convenience factor. On Linux I just get the overall impression we're testing the steam box client, and getting a buggy DRM client out of it. I don't think Valve are really taking Linux seriously like they're making out, they're just getting us to iron the bugs out of the client so they can release a bug-free console. Linux games will be a fortunate side effect of the Steam box, but not the primary focus IMO.

Not impressed.


sounds like the steam BETA is not for you that's all.

I have it running in fedora and not a single issue not one at all

works just as good as it does in windows for me.

32-64bit stuff you are talking about is a non issue for 99.99% of every Linux user who cares if its 32bit you can not tell the diff

#51 Javik

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:01

My guess is that Valve are supporting Ubuntu simply because it's the most mainstream and commonly used Linux distro. Given the Linux predilection for having a gazillion competing alternatives for everything supporting multiple distributions right off the bat was never going to be realistic but I hope in future that they'll manage it without too much fuss.

#52 ShMaunder

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 16:13

Was surprised yesterday when I got in and saw Half Life Beta sitting in the library. Installed and started playing. That wasn't even ported to Mac!

Awaiting for CS 1.6 now, followed hopefully by Portal 2 :D

#53 f0rk_b0mb

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 16:24

Ubuntu 13.04 looks really nice from the videos I've been watching. I might give the beta a try later this weekend. The last one I tried was 11.04. I've been using Fuduntu for the last week, but it doesn't play nice with Steam. Every time I launch Serious Sam 3 BFE my X crashes. Everything else about Fuduntu is perfect, IMO.

#54 guitmz

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 16:29

I must say I found the native steam client stupid on linux. It works and everything else but it won't let us to download any games besides the ones that were made for linux (we can't even download those that works 100% with wine). For now I'm using the windows client with wine and it's a lot better just for that single reason... But well, it's a start for valve, they should improve the service soon

#55 ShMaunder

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 16:38

I must say I found the native steam client stupid on linux. It works and everything else but it won't let us to download any games besides the ones that were made for linux (we can't even download those that works 100% with wine). For now I'm using the windows client with wine and it's a lot better just for that single reason... But well, it's a start for valve, they should improve the service soon


Yea, I'm hoping that Valve put "experimental" WINE options in the client. If a game works 100% in WINE, then I don't really care if its native or not as long as its transparent. It might also encourage game developers to contribute to WINE to get their games working.

#56 guitmz

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 17:03

well said!

wine is a great platform...it really shouldnt be used just as a second option... many apps already uses wine as they own "Linux version" such as teamviewer

#57 torrentthief

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 22:36

i believe counter strike 1.6 was added earlier today not just half life.

#58 medhunter

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 23:29

Yay, testing now