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#76 firey

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 15:15

How is that a problem? It never stopped people from using other non-Microsoft products before. iOS, Android, etc are all "new ways" too. There's no start menu in either of those systems, and both feature touch and swipe motions.


There is a mentality difference. People use Windows at work, they know how it works. They expect it to work certain ways. People use iOS and Android knowing it's different and don't have any expectations.

iOS and Android have operated pretty much the same since launch, as had Windows from 95 -> 7 pretty much. Having to learn something new that should be old-hat is much different than learning something new that is new (nto saying 8 isn't, but it's not the same).

When I load up Visual Studio, or Outlook. I expect it to function exactly the same as previous versions. I expect to open files, open settings, add contacts exactly the same as previous versions. When I can't, I get frustrated and feel the upgrade was not necessary and I shouldn't have even bothered.

I write software for a living so I am by no means computer illiterate, and am not opposed to change. However I have more important things to do, than be helping and troubleshooting problems on an operating system/piece of software that isn't really needed, when something that is only a couple years older does everything that the current one does and in some cases better.


#77 +Nik L

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 15:33

Looks at title. Looks at OP. Moves on...

#78 Dot Matrix

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 15:45

There is a mentality difference. People use Windows at work, they know how it works. They expect it to work certain ways. People use iOS and Android knowing it's different and don't have any expectations.

iOS and Android have operated pretty much the same since launch, as had Windows from 95 -> 7 pretty much. Having to learn something new that should be old-hat is much different than learning something new that is new (nto saying 8 isn't, but it's not the same).

When I load up Visual Studio, or Outlook. I expect it to function exactly the same as previous versions. I expect to open files, open settings, add contacts exactly the same as previous versions. When I can't, I get frustrated and feel the upgrade was not necessary and I shouldn't have even bothered.

I write software for a living so I am by no means computer illiterate, and am not opposed to change. However I have more important things to do, than be helping and troubleshooting problems on an operating system/piece of software that isn't really needed, when something that is only a couple years older does everything that the current one does and in some cases better.


That's not how computing works, dude. If it was, we wouldn't be where we are today. Upgrades happen. New developments happen. Depreciation happens. It's unpreventable.

If you want things to stay the same, then don't upgrade. You'll always be disappointed.

#79 +LightEco

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 15:47

Just pay the $5 for Start8 and voila, you have Windows 7, but with all the under the hood enhancements of 8.

#80 1941

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 15:50

$125 is cheap

How many of you have downgraded a OEM Windows 8 computer to Windows 7?

The majority of drivers don't go BACKWARDS and when you have nutcase scenarios like the HP's latest residential laptop where they specifically come out and say "we have no intentions of releasing Windows 7 drivers" then you're faced with hunting them down.

Now let's get that one device or two that is very hard pressed to find a driver, maybe you've had to modify an INF file to get it to work? The install alone with all the updates (which should be done) can take 30 minutes, then you've got to find and fix every broken device driver and then TEST to make sure everything works...2-3 hours isn't far fetched at all, and unless you're into losing money at your business (i.e. overhead) you're not going to charge $20 for that service.


This attitude by HP could be one of the reasons that their PC division is in financial trouble.

#81 Deactivated.

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 16:00

Just pay the $5 for Start8 and voila, you have Windows 7, but with all the under the hood enhancements of 8.

That's more or less true. Although I'd like my inactive windows to have a shadow, and the active ones to have one that is more prominent. It would be cool if there was a way to build such an option into Start8. At least it was easy enough to add one to the task bar :)

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#82 Growled

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:23

Hey, I paid $249 to upgrade to a Chromebook.