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A few local photographers who use too many filters.


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#16 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:15

First we need to define what you "think" are filters. do you consider black and white, sepia toning, two toning and such filters ? because most of what you're seeing here is developing.


Half true, this was developing with film... Heck even lightroom and photoshop calls them filters.

I wanted to see some actual photographs. :/

+1 someone hot link images here...


#17 vetneufuse

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:16

Interesting that you mention that, I was planning on asking something related to that: At which point are filters cheating? I did indeed try physical filters on my camera in the past and I would still class them as acceptable today. So why do I find a difference between a physical filter and digital effects in an image editor?

I think the answer to my question is that there isn't a real difference between the two. Some minor editing in an image editor isn't always a bad thing. The problem is that it's now so easy to do that people feel the need to slap as many effects on to their images as they can.


well there is one difference, digital filters can wreak havoc on an image's histogram... a gel filter or other type of screw on filter (polarization, etc) can do stuff digital ones can't... especially when you get into polarization and Neutral Density filters.... digital can't correct what those ones can... but digital can alter colors and contrast in ways physical filters cant

First we need to define what you "think" are filters.

do you consider black and white, sepia toning, two toning and such filters ?
because most of what you're seeing here is developing.


problem is, most people now days think of that (what use to be developing processes for contrast, etc, and photo editing / touchups) as filters now, thank you adobe for calling them filters

#18 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:18

, most people now days think of that (what use to be developing processes for contrast, etc, and photo editing / touchups) as filters now, thank you adobe for calling them filters


+1

#19 vetneufuse

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:19

Anyways the thing that bothers me most about the pictures you posted (if bothers me at all) is that most of the subjects arent even centered. So if they frame the pictures they'll have two tiny poeple on the right side, with over half the picture being basically white space.


in art school, you are usually taught centering a subject is a bad thing and lacks creativity....

Odd, my lightroom and other such items as settings under the DEVELOP tab.And when you download some from the web such as adobe exchange they are referred to as development presets.


yet in photoshop they are all called filters... what you are looking at under the develop tab is "presets" for fast "developing" aka contrast / color correction...not real "filters" which do more

#20 Hum

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:21

Good thing about the digital age is anyone can be a photographer pornographer, and there is no harm in that at all.


Fixed that. :p

#21 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:24

in art school, you are usually taught centering a subject is a bad thing and lacks creativity....



yet in photoshop they are all called filters... what you are looking at under the develop tab is "presets" for fast "developing" aka contrast / color correction...not real "filters" which do more


You've no idea how I like to break the rules of thirds :p

#22 HawkMan

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:32

Half true, this was developing with film... Heck even lightroom and photoshop calls them filters.


+1 someone hot link images here...


Lightroom is basically digital "developing" of RAW files. Also while I can't get up Lr on this computer I dont' recall it calling halftoning or converting to "proper" black and White filters.

In school you're taught to think and act like others. Creativity has no part in that.
Photoshop and lightroom, and other developing tools are greatly different, and serve different purposes.

once again, if you take good pictures, people will like them. period.
Who cares about the technicalities? Only weirdos who think they're more professional.


Basically it comes down to artistic/creative choice. Some people like and prefer their pictures in Black and white or Sepia toning. that doesn't make them filter abusers, it just means that's how they like to have their pictures. sure some people overdo sepia toning and put in way to much color, but that's just down to lack of experience and training.

You've no idea how I like to break the rules of thirds :p


I'd say today, the rules of thirds themselves show a lack of creativity, Everyone knows about them, it's the first thing they're thought in amateur photography 101, and in every "your first photograph" in any camera manual. and people stick stuff in thirds for no good reason whatsoever.

yet in photoshop they are all called filters... what you are looking at under the develop tab is "presets" for fast "developing" aka contrast / color correction...not real "filters" which do more


Well he's talking about LightRoom, NOT photoshop. one is an photo editor, the other a photo developer/manager.

#23 shozilla

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:34

Meh i think anyone who loves capturing views is a photographer. Where is the line that says one person is one, and the other isnt? Even if it is just a hobby.
No real need to be more technical than that.

Everyone uses filters, even "professionals", dating back decades. Even cameras have filters built into them now just to give you the default picture.

i do use filters and such in lightroom, but its only to bring the photos out. sometimes the camera doesn't catch what the actual view was. As hawkman said, this is developing.
I don't really need people telling me im a noob for doing whatever i do, many people love my photos either way.

This girl seemed to use the ugly cheap white faded edges effects though

Anyways the thing that bothers me most about the pictures you posted (if bothers me at all) is that most of the subjects arent even centered. So if they frame the pictures they'll have two tiny poeple on the right side, with over half the picture being basically white space.


Good thing about the digital age is anyone can be a photographer, and there is no harm in that at all.


It doesn't have to be centered every time... It is about creativity.

Everyone can be a photographer but not everyone can be like a professional or have a creative mind.

#24 KRazpopov

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:39

I can't really remember having used filters any time. The closest I've gotten is tweaking the curves on the image in post-processing a bit.

#25 HawkMan

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:40

well there is one difference, digital filters can wreak havoc on an image's histogram... a gel filter or other type of screw on filter (polarization, etc) can do stuff digital ones can't... especially when you get into polarization and Neutral Density filters.... digital can't correct what those ones can... but digital can alter colors and contrast in ways physical filters cant


Well polarization filters and ND Filters are there to correct for inefficiencies or deficiensis in the actual technique of capturing with a camera, like reflections(Especially on water), and being able to use longer shutter times in bright days.

and yes, you can't remove certain polarized light in post. and of course you can't prevent the image from having to much light in post, though you can generally adjust exposure by +/- two steps, but this doesn't really solve the problem ND's do.

I think what people most think about here is gel filters and color filters, and these can be perfectly e recreated as actual filters in post, even better since you can adjust it to a much better degree. or at all :) I wouldn't really classify Polarization and ND filters as effects filters as such.

I mean, you wouldn't use Vaseline to get a soft filter now anymore :)

#26 shozilla

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:45

I wanted to see some actual photographs. :/


There you go: http://www.neowin.ne...y-edition-2013/

#27 vetneufuse

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 14:57

In school you're taught to think and act like others. Creativity has no part in that.


never went to art school huh?... it's definatly not teaching you to be ike others... they teach you the basics and make you go out on your own, then defend why you went that way... definatly not "you didn't do it like the masters you fail" idea.....

Well polarization filters and ND Filters are there to correct for inefficiencies or deficiensis in the actual technique of capturing with a camera, like reflections(Especially on water), and being able to use longer shutter times in bright days.

and yes, you can't remove certain polarized light in post. and of course you can't prevent the image from having to much light in post, though you can generally adjust exposure by +/- two steps, but this doesn't really solve the problem ND's do.

I think what people most think about here is gel filters and color filters, and these can be perfectly e recreated as actual filters in post, even better since you can adjust it to a much better degree. or at all :) I wouldn't really classify Polarization and ND filters as effects filters as such.

I mean, you wouldn't use Vaseline to get a soft filter now anymore :)


there is other uses for vaseline? :o hehe j/k :laugh:

#28 OP +warwagon

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 15:44

Photos Added to first post

#29 vetneufuse

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 16:11

Well he's talking about LightRoom, NOT photoshop. one is an photo editor, the other a photo developer/manager.


acutally, I'm the one that brought up light room, and photoshop :p

#30 Geoffrey B.

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 16:29

i love how anyone with a DSLR things they are a photographer now lol.