Jump to content



Photo

Nintendo 64 on LCD


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#16 68k

68k

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 4
  • Joined: 20-January 10
  • Location: Australia

Posted 04 February 2013 - 13:28

Welcome to old N64s. i strongly recommend not blowing into the cartridges or the cartridge slot as we used to do as kids - as it turns out, all it does is just leave tiny bits of spit on the connectors and ends up rusting them :p


A trick I found was just to plug and unplug the cartridge several times before switching the unit on. By doing this, you're basically scraping off the oxidized layer from the cartridge's PCB tracks, and perhaps even the connector inside the 64 - shiny surfaces will usually always become oxidized (except for gold I think). I sometimes had to do it 20-30 times (while the unit was off of course) - but it always seemed to work.

Forget blowing - it won't help a cartridge that hasn't been used for 10 years. You're probably going to make the oxidization worse.


#17 guitmz

guitmz

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 10-June 11
  • Location: Brazil
  • OS: Windows 8, Arch Linux, OSX 10.9
  • Phone: Nexus 4

Posted 04 February 2013 - 13:29

^ you are correct.. i always to that!

#18 68k

68k

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 4
  • Joined: 20-January 10
  • Location: Australia

Posted 04 February 2013 - 13:36

A blank screen ("No Signal") could most likely be the sign of the cartridge not being read correctly - try my steps above. The AV part of it should be fine. The 64 will not output a signal unless the cartridge can be accessed properly.

Have a look at the cartridge contacts - if they're as dull as a well-used $1 or $2 coin, then they're most likely heavily oxidized. When the cartridge was new, they would have been shiny.

#19 xendrome

xendrome

    In God We Trust; All Others We Monitor

  • Tech Issues Solved: 10
  • Joined: 05-December 01
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro x64

Posted 04 February 2013 - 14:08

q-tips and a drop of rubbing alcohol will typically clean the contacts pretty well.

#20 The Teej

The Teej

    Also known as The Tjalian

  • Joined: 03-October 05
  • Location: England, UK

Posted 04 February 2013 - 15:00

A trick I found was just to plug and unplug the cartridge several times before switching the unit on. By doing this, you're basically scraping off the oxidized layer from the cartridge's PCB tracks, and perhaps even the connector inside the 64 - shiny surfaces will usually always become oxidized (except for gold I think). I sometimes had to do it 20-30 times (while the unit was off of course) - but it always seemed to work.

Forget blowing - it won't help a cartridge that hasn't been used for 10 years. You're probably going to make the oxidization worse.


Yep, you're bang on. It's also a part luck thing too, hoping to get a good enough connection for the game to work :p

#21 AR556

AR556

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 07-August 03

Posted 04 February 2013 - 15:06

A trick I found was just to plug and unplug the cartridge several times before switching the unit on. By doing this, you're basically scraping off the oxidized layer from the cartridge's PCB tracks, and perhaps even the connector inside the 64 - shiny surfaces will usually always become oxidized (except for gold I think). I sometimes had to do it 20-30 times (while the unit was off of course) - but it always seemed to work.

Forget blowing - it won't help a cartridge that hasn't been used for 10 years. You're probably going to make the oxidization worse.


Q-Tips n' clear rubbing alcohol always worked for me. If that doesn't work, Dremel and a light buffing pad will shine the gold contacts right up. Don't over do it though! You'll need the special bit to open up the cartridges and as with all electronics, beware of static!