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DirtyLarry

Would A New Router Give Me "Better" WiFi?

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I could be wrong on this, but as far as I know Optimum hasn't updated to IPv6.

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I could be wrong on this, but as far as I know Optimum hasn't updated to IPv6.

Nope you are right. I did a bit more research after I posted and that is indeed the case. So not even an option.

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So my new router arrived today, and simply put... It rocks. :punk:

Out the box, default settings, set up SSID with password, BOOM, defaults to the fastest speeds possible (450 Mbit/sec), 5 GHz signal, my signal strength is BY FAR the best it has ever been. Just everything is so nice.

Just some quick screens...

https://dl.dropbox.c...SUS_WiFi_01.jpg

https://dl.dropbox.c...SUS_WiFi_02.jpg

So, a couple of questions for those that have this router, just wondering about a few settings.

First off after thinking about it, I will be sticking to the default stock firmware for now (I did update it right away, so on the latest version, 3.0.0.4.270). I thought Anaron said it best, custom firmware is really for power users, and I am not that. I just want to set up a few settings, and let it work. Sure, I may not be getting everything out of the router I can, but for now (I may definitely revisit this in the near future), just want to leave things as simple as possible.)

  1. So first off, should I enable QoS? If so, what should I put for the Upload and Download Bandwidth if I do enable it? (I get 50 down and 8 up from my ISP if that even matters).
  2. I honestly am not familiar with what IPv6 is, but see it mentioned frequently. Should I enable it (can I even enable it?)? And if so, what is it exactly? :blush:
  3. Under Firewall settings, there is an option to "Enable DOS protection" that by default is off. Should I turn it on? (just kind of sounds like something that should maybe be on :laugh: )
  4. I used to forward ports for services like Live, PSN, Apple TV, and I have a txt document of all the ports I did forward for each service. I guess I should just try each service and take it from there instead of automatically forwarding the port for each one? (each device also has a static IP)

That is it for now, I really just set it up 10 minutes ago, as I said, already so much better so hoping it stays this way, just curious about the above.

TIA for anyone who can answer, and again, thanks to everyone for the help in getting this router. I am so far very, very pleased. (Y)

I knew you'd like it. ASUS did an amazing job with the RT-N66U wireless router. It's pricey but worth every penny.

As for your questions:

  1. No. In my house, there are as many as seven people using the Internet and I haven't had any speed issues yet. You should only enable QoS when you have issues during heavy load (e.g. a scenario where there are a lot of devices on your network). In my case, the router is working fine and I haven't even thought about enabling QoS yet. I imagine there are less than seven people in your house so you have absolutely no need for QoS.
  2. IPv6 was made to replace IPv4 (regular IP addresses like 192.168.1.1). A lot of places haven't run out of IPv4 addresses so you don't have to worry about it. If and when your ISP rolls out IPv6 addresses, your router will use it.
  3. I don't have that option enabled. It's unnecessary but basically what it does is protect your router from "denial-of-service" attacks. The chances that you and I will be targeted is extremely low so there's no point in enabling it. It'll just increase your router's workload for no real benefit.
  4. I used to do the same thing on my old D-Link gaming router and in hindsight, I think it was a huge waste of time. The only time you need to open ports is if you're hosting a server and you want others to be able to find that server. Fortunately, most newer games don't require you to open any ports. As you said, just try each one and see if you come across an issue. If so, then open the required port. If not, then just leave it alone. :laugh:

It's a solid router so I'm sure it's running just as good as it did day-1 now that you've had it for nearly a week.

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I wouldn't say 3rd party firmware is for power users, I would say its for anyone that is not happy with the native. If there is something you want/need your router and native does not support it. Good chance 3rd party does.

If your router is giving your issues, locks up, have to reboot it to get internet working again, etc.. What would it hurt to try 3rd party, they have a much better support model and update schedule to iron out bugs. Most major routers don't update firmware to add features unless there is a public outcry for it, and rarely fix any sort of bugs again unless reported by a large portion of the user base. Once the device is like 6 months old, good luck seeing any updates - they normally move on to their new model number and just leave the old users hanging for issues.

Nothing saying you have to move to 3rd party day one -- but it is nice to have it there as an option!! I would never suggest anyone buy a router that does not have 3rd party support. You never know what your wanting to do with device 6 months from now that was not part of the native firmware and you thought you would never need to do, etc.

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I wouldn't say 3rd party firmware is for power users, I would say its for anyone that is not happy with the native. If there is something you want/need your router and native does not support it. Good chance 3rd party does.

If your router is giving your issues, locks up, have to reboot it to get internet working again, etc.. What would it hurt to try 3rd party, they have a much better support model and update schedule to iron out bugs. Most major routers don't update firmware to add features unless there is a public outcry for it, and rarely fix any sort of bugs again unless reported by a large portion of the user base. Once the device is like 6 months old, good luck seeing any updates - they normally move on to their new model number and just leave the old users hanging for issues.

Nothing saying you have to move to 3rd party day one -- but it is nice to have it there as an option!! I would never suggest anyone buy a router that does not have 3rd party support. You never know what your wanting to do with device 6 months from now that was not part of the native firmware and you thought you would never need to do, etc.

True, but you'd have to be somewhat of a power user in order to flash your router's firmware. You have to find out if your router can even be flashed with 3rd-party firmware and with some models, you need to take extra steps to get it to work properly. Just imagine how much an average Joe would freak out if he bricked his router because he tried to flash it with the wrong firmware.

If you're tech savvy, then it isn't hard (assuming you do your homework). Most guides are thorough enough, from what I've seen. But if you skip one step or make an error, then chances you've just acquired a new paper weight. I plan on using 3rd-party firmware a year or two down the line. I still have my old D-Link router which works fine with one or two people on the network so it'll serve as a guinea pig.

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I wouldn't say 3rd party firmware is for power users, I would say its for anyone that is not happy with the native. If there is something you want/need your router and native does not support it. Good chance 3rd party does.

If your router is giving your issues, locks up, have to reboot it to get internet working again, etc.. What would it hurt to try 3rd party, they have a much better support model and update schedule to iron out bugs. Most major routers don't update firmware to add features unless there is a public outcry for it, and rarely fix any sort of bugs again unless reported by a large portion of the user base. Once the device is like 6 months old, good luck seeing any updates - they normally move on to their new model number and just leave the old users hanging for issues.

Nothing saying you have to move to 3rd party day one -- but it is nice to have it there as an option!! I would never suggest anyone buy a router that does not have 3rd party support. You never know what your wanting to do with device 6 months from now that was not part of the native firmware and you thought you would never need to do, etc.

Fair enough points. So I at least got a router that provides the option!!

True, but you'd have to be somewhat of a power user in order to flash your router's firmware. You have to find out if your router can even be flashed with 3rd-party firmware and with some models, you need to take extra steps to get it to work properly. Just imagine how much an average Joe would freak out if he bricked his router because he tried to flash it with the wrong firmware.

If you're tech savvy, then it isn't hard (assuming you do your homework). Most guides are thorough enough, from what I've seen. But if you skip one step or make an error, then chances you've just acquired a new paper weight. I plan on using 3rd-party firmware a year or two down the line. I still have my old D-Link router which works fine with one or two people on the network so it'll serve as a guinea pig.

I have flashed my old Linksys router with Hyper DDRT or whatever it was called, modded a 360 which was a whole bunch of insane steps including hooking up some crazy component to my SATA port, a PSP, and a few other devices over the years. I am fine with the actual steps of changing firmware, so that is not an issue. But I find in my older age I have a lower tolerance for tinkering, and just prefer things work as they should by default if possible. I guess I am not as brave as I once was, and just have way less time then I once did as well.

With the above said, it looks like I am going to have to play with some of the settings regardless next week. I am actually switching back to Verizon FIOS, going to soon be a Quantum customer (75 down 35 up :punk: ), and it is my understanding you must use the router they supply to you in order to get every feature they offer, such as the guide, etc. So it sounds as if I will be setting this Asus router up as an Access Point and not my main router. Slightly bummed about this fact since I just purchased it, but I really did not anticipate that I would be going back to Verizon so soon (it was door to door salesmen that got me back with them, not kidding). Setting it up as an AP looks easy enough from the brief research I have quickly done, they even have a wizard to do it if needed, and the hit on overall performance should be negligible.

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I have flashed my old Linksys router with Hyper DDRT or whatever it was called, modded a 360 which was a whole bunch of insane steps including hooking up some crazy component to my SATA port, a PSP, and a few other devices over the years. I am fine with the actual steps of changing firmware, so that is not an issue. But I find in my older age I have a lower tolerance for tinkering, and just prefer things work as they should by default if possible. I guess I am not as brave as I once was, and just have way less time then I once did as well.

With the above said, it looks like I am going to have to play with some of the settings regardless next week. I am actually switching back to Verizon FIOS, going to soon be a Quantum customer (75 down 35 up :punk: ), and it is my understanding you must use the router they supply to you in order to get every feature they offer, such as the guide, etc. So it sounds as if I will be setting this Asus router up as an Access Point and not my main router. Slightly bummed about this fact since I just purchased it, but I really did not anticipate that I would be going back to Verizon so soon (it was door to door salesmen that got me back with them, not kidding). Setting it up as an AP looks easy enough from the brief research I have quickly done, they even have a wizard to do it if needed, and the hit on overall performance should be negligible.

I hear you man. It's nice to be able to tweak your hardware to get the most out of it. But it's also nice to have something that just works great out of the box with as little tweaking as possible.

I saw your thread about switching back to Verizon earlier. I've heard of ISPs recommending that you use their router and they usually do that with a modem/router combo. That is, a modem that has a built-in wireless router. I doubt it would have a unique feature that makes your Internet work better or anything. I've read posts from people that said they disabled the built-in router to use a different, and often times better, wireless router.

Anyway, I took a look at the specs of the Verizon FiOS router and it doesn't look like it's better than your ASUS RT-N66U. Maybe you should try using that as your main router first and see how things work. It wouldn't hurt to try right?

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I hear you man. It's nice to be able to tweak your hardware to get the most out of it. But it's also nice to have something that just works great out of the box with as little tweaking as possible.

I saw your thread about switching back to Verizon earlier. I've heard of ISPs recommending that you use their router and they usually do that with a modem/router combo. That is, a modem that has a built-in wireless router. I doubt it would have a unique feature that makes your Internet work better or anything. I've read posts from people that said they disabled the built-in router to use a different, and often times better, wireless router.

Anyway, I took a look at the specs of the Verizon FiOS router and it doesn't look like it's better than your ASUS RT-N66U. Maybe you should try using that as your main router first and see how things work. It wouldn't hurt to try right?

I worded things weird, I definitely plan on using my Asus as my main router, but have to have it act as an AP off of their router, that is what I meant. I just prefer I did not even have to use theirs at all, but it should not hurt anything as you said, just an extra piece of equipment that if I could get away with not using, I would, but sounds as if they have some proprietary firmware that aspects of their services just will not work without. I guess I will find out this upcoming Tuesday.

I actually took off from work to be home for the switch to FIOS, so I will have a whole day to play around with things until they are good to go. (Y)

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I worded things weird, I definitely plan on using my Asus as my main router, but have to have it act as an AP off of their router, that is what I meant. I just prefer I did not even have to use theirs at all, but it should not hurt anything as you said, just an extra piece of equipment that if I could get away with not using, I would, but sounds as if they have some proprietary firmware that aspects of their services just will not work without. I guess I will find out this upcoming Tuesday.

I actually took off from work to be home for the switch to FIOS, so I will have a whole day to play around with things until they are good to go. (Y)

Do you not have the ability to put the modem/router combo provided by your ISP into bridge mode? This would force your modem to act as just a modem and disable the router junk from it, allowing you to use your router directly connected to your ISP. Effectively eliminating an extra layer that isn't necessary.

If you're not sure, do a quick search online for your modem model and you should be able to find a guide to do this, or Verizon will possibly do it for you as well.

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FIOS is installed, Asus is setup as an AP. These are my speeds over Wireless.

2536322419.png

Wired is a tad faster.

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FIOS is installed, Asus is setup as an AP. These are my speeds over Wireless.

2536322419.png

Wired is a tad faster.

Nice !

What speeds did you have before that .?

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Nice !

What speeds did you have before that .?

50/15, so a nice little bump.

So a question for the network gurus, I want to assign the Asus which is setup as an Access Point a Static IP so it does not change, I see how to do that, but I am wondering, do I need to enter anything for the DNS fields? It looks like by default it has nothing in them? Or do I enter the DNS Servers reported by my main router?

So right now the Asus as an Access Point is 192.168.1.11

This will always change, and Asus has a Device Discovery app for Windows that tells you what it changes to, but that is a pain in the ass.

So I want to change it to lets say 192.168.1.166

I just leave everything else like the Default Gateway and Subnet Mask alone correct? (meaning at 192.168.1.1 and 255.255.255.0 respectively)

Here is a screen...

AsusAccessPoint-SETTINGS.png

And once I get it setup as a static IP, should I go ahead and add it as the DMZ'd device on my main router?

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I am getting a new router which it is being shipped to me. I look forward to it.

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DL - Just thought you should see this since you'd probably like it better :)

http://www.dslreports.com/faq/16077

Basically you can use your WAN port on the ONT to get Internet but set the Actiontec device as secondary to power your TVs over the "cable" line. That way your ASUS is the main router in the house and controls internet and directly talks to the ONT. You can turn off wireless on the Actiontec and just stick it in some corner (still connected for MoCA/COAX :p)

That or you can setup COAX and Ethernet at the sametime. The Coax goes to your STB/TVs while the Ethernet goes to your ASUS.

http://www.dslreports.com/faq/16622

FYI you suck for having options - I'd take me some of that sweet uploads (backing up 200GB server at work was a 6 day process!)

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Thanks as always Shotta, but not sure how any of that would improve my situation based on what I am seeing right now??? My Wireless speeds are as fast as wired, I see all my devices as if they are on the same network. Apple TV with AirPlay works, I can stream from my PC to PS3, I can connect to my Windows Gaming PC from my Macbook as always, everything seems to be working exactly as it should with my current setup. So I am almost of the mindset to just leave well enough alone you know?

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So can anyone answer if I need to put the DNS Name Servers or can I just leave them blank as show in the screenshot? Referring to this post here.

I plan on making the IP Static, something like 192.168.1.77,

Again, this is just so it is easy to access from a browser. But I am hesitant for whatever stupid reason to change it since everything is working perfectly right now. Asus has a Discovery Utility if I leave it to Automatic that will find what the assigned IP winds up being, but that is Windows only, and although I have a Windows machine, I am mainly on my mac, hence why I want to make it static.

Will leave Subnet Mask at 255.255.255.0

And Gateway will be the main router, so the normal 192.168.1.1

Just need to know if I need to enter anything for DNS Name Servers, or does the main router handle that which I am thinking it does?

If I do need to enter something, do I just enter the DNS Name Servers that are listed on my main router (have that page open now so know what they are).

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If you only want your Asus to be a dumb connection then leave it as is and enjoy. Your devices will connect to it but all data will be past to the Actiontec for DHCP/DNS or routing so that will work just fine.

As for my other post, I posted it in the instance you didn't want to use Verizon's "crappy" router and use your new baby for the full management of the network. If the Verizon stuff works then no need to mess with it anymore.

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If you only want your Asus to be a dumb connection then leave it as is and enjoy. Your devices will connect to it but all data will be past to the Actiontec for DHCP/DNS or routing so that will work just fine.

As for my other post, I posted it in the instance you didn't want to use Verizon's "crappy" router and use your new baby for the full management of the network. If the Verizon stuff works then no need to mess with it anymore.

Yeah it just seems like there is a lot of room for the Verizon hardware to not work as it should with the alternatives. I would LOVE to have my Dark Knight (that is the actual name LOL) control everything, but I also do have a multi room DVR etc. that I want to work hassle free. Honestly even with the DK playing second fiddle, everything seems to be working pretty damn good. I disabled the Verizon's router Wireless, it was crap no doubt. Thanks again for all the help, no doubt appreciated. (Y)

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Finally assigned the Static IP to my Asus acting as an Access Point. I waited until the weekend just in case for whatever reason something went wrong and I needed to troubleshoot, was no need as it took about 1 minute total.

So interesting observation I had, I originally did not assign the DNS servers, and my Wireless was overall about 10-15 Mb slower. As soon as I assigned the DNS Name Servers, I went back to the normal speeds...

2546167604.png

So why is that out of curiosity? I would think it was getting the DNS from the Verizon just the same as before when I had it set to Auto, so was it not? Or was it something else entirely?

Also speaking of the DNS servers, what are peoples thoughts on Open DNS? The way to go? When I assigned them, I put an Open DNS server as Name Server 1, and I matched the same DNS Server in spot #2 from my Verizon router? Should I not do this, and do either one or the other?

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Finally assigned the Static IP to my Asus acting as an Access Point. I waited until the weekend just in case for whatever reason something went wrong and I needed to troubleshoot, was no need as it took about 1 minute total.

So interesting observation I had, I originally did not assign the DNS servers, and my Wireless was overall about 10-15 Mb slower. As soon as I assigned the DNS Name Servers, I went back to the normal speeds...

2546167604.png

So why is that out of curiosity? I would think it was getting the DNS from the Verizon just the same as before when I had it set to Auto, so was it not? Or was it something else entirely?

Also speaking of the DNS servers, what are peoples thoughts on Open DNS? The way to go? When I assigned them, I put an Open DNS server as Name Server 1, and I matched the same DNS Server in spot #2 from my Verizon router? Should I not do this, and do either one or the other?

The ASUS RT-N66U uses its own DNS servers by default so that's why you had slower speeds. If you want to use your ISP's DNS server, you'll have to set them on your Verizon router as well as your ASUS router. If you only do it on your Verizon router, then I think any device connecting to the ASUS router will use the ASUS DNS servers. You'll want to use your ISP's DNS servers because generally, they're the fastest. OpenDNS is great but you should only use it for its features.

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It would supposedly give you better WiFi.

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You do understand the what dns serves you point to have NOTHING to do with the latency or bandwidth between you and some server you moving data between.

Could dns effect your browsing speed in the sense that it takes longer to resolve something - sure! Once that something is resolved DNS is no longer in the picture and how fast you download or upload between that server and you has again nothing to do with dns.

Thinking the dns server you used to resolve speedtest.net has something to do with how fast your test was is pure and utter nonsense.

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I just got a referb Apple AirPort Extreme, and love it. Comes with built in USB 2.0 port. And awesomely easy setup and better wireless coverage . Never going back to linksys or net gear ever again.

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