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Would A New Router Give Me "Better" WiFi?


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#46 nekkidtruth

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 02:37

To love a functional piece of technology that isn't an antique based upon it's looks is the least reason why anyone should love it. People love their cars because they worked great before they crapped out. The car didn't half-work or have half of it's functionality disabled while it was working.


Plenty of people love their non-fully functional car. You're being ridiculous. I also clearly explained it was more than it's "looks".


#47 OP vetDirtyLarry

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 18:30

Plenty of people love their non-fully functional car. You're being ridiculous. I also clearly explained it was more than it's "looks".

Yeah I have to agree, seem to be making something out of nothing. I get what you were saying, I love my Macbook, but I do not love my Macbook.

#48 OP vetDirtyLarry

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:54

So my new router arrived today, and simply put... It rocks. :punk:
Out the box, default settings, set up SSID with password, BOOM, defaults to the fastest speeds possible (450 Mbit/sec), 5 GHz signal, my signal strength is BY FAR the best it has ever been. Just everything is so nice.
Just some quick screens...
Posted Image
Posted Image
So, a couple of questions for those that have this router, just wondering about a few settings.

First off after thinking about it, I will be sticking to the default stock firmware for now (I did update it right away, so on the latest version, 3.0.0.4.270). I thought Anaron said it best, custom firmware is really for power users, and I am not that. I just want to set up a few settings, and let it work. Sure, I may not be getting everything out of the router I can, but for now (I may definitely revisit this in the near future), just want to leave things as simple as possible.)
  • So first off, should I enable QoS? If so, what should I put for the Upload and Download Bandwidth if I do enable it? (I get 50 down and 8 up from my ISP if that even matters).
  • I honestly am not familiar with what IPv6 is, but see it mentioned frequently. Should I enable it (can I even enable it?)? And if so, what is it exactly? :blush:
  • Under Firewall settings, there is an option to "Enable DOS protection" that by default is off. Should I turn it on? (just kind of sounds like something that should maybe be on :laugh: )
  • I used to forward ports for services like Live, PSN, Apple TV, and I have a txt document of all the ports I did forward for each service. I guess I should just try each service and take it from there instead of automatically forwarding the port for each one? (each device also has a static IP)
That is it for now, I really just set it up 10 minutes ago, as I said, already so much better so hoping it stays this way, just curious about the above.

TIA for anyone who can answer, and again, thanks to everyone for the help in getting this router. I am so far very, very pleased. (Y)

#49 nekkidtruth

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 02:03

I used to forward ports for services like Live, PSN, Apple TV, and I have a txt document of all the ports I did forward for each service. I guess I should just try each service and take it from there instead of automatically forwarding the port for each one? (each device also has a static IP)
That is it for now, I really just set it up 10 minutes ago, as I said, already so much better so hoping it stays this way, just curious about the above.


I'll leave the other questions for the others but I wanted to touch base with this one.

Realistically, you don't need to forward ports unless a specific application/service/software is experiencing difficulties. I used to port everything to specific ports and point to specific machines all the time. I wasted so much time doing that, thinking it was doing me good when all it was really doing was wasting my time.

My machines all get static IP addresses regardless, it keeps things simple as I need to know which machine is where at all times. Drive mappings etc among other things. So I just forward ports to specific machines as they become an issue or I come across something that specifically requires it. It's mainly server software or very specific applications that need a port pointed to it :) For good measure, I'd maybe assign a port for torrent traffic to each machine that requires it, but above that...you really don't need it :)

#50 OP vetDirtyLarry

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 02:35

I'll leave the other questions for the others but I wanted to touch base with this one.

Realistically, you don't need to forward ports unless a specific application/service/software is experiencing difficulties. I used to port everything to specific ports and point to specific machines all the time. I wasted so much time doing that, thinking it was doing me good when all it was really doing was wasting my time.

My machines all get static IP addresses regardless, it keeps things simple as I need to know which machine is where at all times. Drive mappings etc among other things. So I just forward ports to specific machines as they become an issue or I come across something that specifically requires it. It's mainly server software or very specific applications that need a port pointed to it :) For good measure, I'd maybe assign a port for torrent traffic to each machine that requires it, but above that...you really don't need it :)

Awesome thanks, this is exactly what I thought may be the case, so thanks for confirming it. Very much appreciated. :yes:
And I agree, I like Static IP's simply for the fact I know what is what. Enable them whenever I can. Actually, no clue why I have yet to do it on any of my PC's. Have to look into that.

#51 SadJoker

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:33

I could be wrong on this, but as far as I know Optimum hasn't updated to IPv6.

#52 OP vetDirtyLarry

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 13:35

I could be wrong on this, but as far as I know Optimum hasn't updated to IPv6.

Nope you are right. I did a bit more research after I posted and that is indeed the case. So not even an option.

#53 Yusuf M.

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 14:32

So my new router arrived today, and simply put... It rocks. :punk:
Out the box, default settings, set up SSID with password, BOOM, defaults to the fastest speeds possible (450 Mbit/sec), 5 GHz signal, my signal strength is BY FAR the best it has ever been. Just everything is so nice.
Just some quick screens...
https://dl.dropbox.c...SUS_WiFi_01.jpg
https://dl.dropbox.c...SUS_WiFi_02.jpg
So, a couple of questions for those that have this router, just wondering about a few settings.

First off after thinking about it, I will be sticking to the default stock firmware for now (I did update it right away, so on the latest version, 3.0.0.4.270). I thought Anaron said it best, custom firmware is really for power users, and I am not that. I just want to set up a few settings, and let it work. Sure, I may not be getting everything out of the router I can, but for now (I may definitely revisit this in the near future), just want to leave things as simple as possible.)

  • So first off, should I enable QoS? If so, what should I put for the Upload and Download Bandwidth if I do enable it? (I get 50 down and 8 up from my ISP if that even matters).
  • I honestly am not familiar with what IPv6 is, but see it mentioned frequently. Should I enable it (can I even enable it?)? And if so, what is it exactly? :blush:
  • Under Firewall settings, there is an option to "Enable DOS protection" that by default is off. Should I turn it on? (just kind of sounds like something that should maybe be on :laugh: )
  • I used to forward ports for services like Live, PSN, Apple TV, and I have a txt document of all the ports I did forward for each service. I guess I should just try each service and take it from there instead of automatically forwarding the port for each one? (each device also has a static IP)
That is it for now, I really just set it up 10 minutes ago, as I said, already so much better so hoping it stays this way, just curious about the above.

TIA for anyone who can answer, and again, thanks to everyone for the help in getting this router. I am so far very, very pleased. (Y)

I knew you'd like it. ASUS did an amazing job with the RT-N66U wireless router. It's pricey but worth every penny.

As for your questions:
  • No. In my house, there are as many as seven people using the Internet and I haven't had any speed issues yet. You should only enable QoS when you have issues during heavy load (e.g. a scenario where there are a lot of devices on your network). In my case, the router is working fine and I haven't even thought about enabling QoS yet. I imagine there are less than seven people in your house so you have absolutely no need for QoS.
  • IPv6 was made to replace IPv4 (regular IP addresses like 192.168.1.1). A lot of places haven't run out of IPv4 addresses so you don't have to worry about it. If and when your ISP rolls out IPv6 addresses, your router will use it.
  • I don't have that option enabled. It's unnecessary but basically what it does is protect your router from "denial-of-service" attacks. The chances that you and I will be targeted is extremely low so there's no point in enabling it. It'll just increase your router's workload for no real benefit.
  • I used to do the same thing on my old D-Link gaming router and in hindsight, I think it was a huge waste of time. The only time you need to open ports is if you're hosting a server and you want others to be able to find that server. Fortunately, most newer games don't require you to open any ports. As you said, just try each one and see if you come across an issue. If so, then open the required port. If not, then just leave it alone. :laugh:
It's a solid router so I'm sure it's running just as good as it did day-1 now that you've had it for nearly a week.

#54 +BudMan

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 14:39

I wouldn't say 3rd party firmware is for power users, I would say its for anyone that is not happy with the native. If there is something you want/need your router and native does not support it. Good chance 3rd party does.

If your router is giving your issues, locks up, have to reboot it to get internet working again, etc.. What would it hurt to try 3rd party, they have a much better support model and update schedule to iron out bugs. Most major routers don't update firmware to add features unless there is a public outcry for it, and rarely fix any sort of bugs again unless reported by a large portion of the user base. Once the device is like 6 months old, good luck seeing any updates - they normally move on to their new model number and just leave the old users hanging for issues.

Nothing saying you have to move to 3rd party day one -- but it is nice to have it there as an option!! I would never suggest anyone buy a router that does not have 3rd party support. You never know what your wanting to do with device 6 months from now that was not part of the native firmware and you thought you would never need to do, etc.

#55 Yusuf M.

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 15:03

I wouldn't say 3rd party firmware is for power users, I would say its for anyone that is not happy with the native. If there is something you want/need your router and native does not support it. Good chance 3rd party does.

If your router is giving your issues, locks up, have to reboot it to get internet working again, etc.. What would it hurt to try 3rd party, they have a much better support model and update schedule to iron out bugs. Most major routers don't update firmware to add features unless there is a public outcry for it, and rarely fix any sort of bugs again unless reported by a large portion of the user base. Once the device is like 6 months old, good luck seeing any updates - they normally move on to their new model number and just leave the old users hanging for issues.

Nothing saying you have to move to 3rd party day one -- but it is nice to have it there as an option!! I would never suggest anyone buy a router that does not have 3rd party support. You never know what your wanting to do with device 6 months from now that was not part of the native firmware and you thought you would never need to do, etc.

True, but you'd have to be somewhat of a power user in order to flash your router's firmware. You have to find out if your router can even be flashed with 3rd-party firmware and with some models, you need to take extra steps to get it to work properly. Just imagine how much an average Joe would freak out if he bricked his router because he tried to flash it with the wrong firmware.

If you're tech savvy, then it isn't hard (assuming you do your homework). Most guides are thorough enough, from what I've seen. But if you skip one step or make an error, then chances you've just acquired a new paper weight. I plan on using 3rd-party firmware a year or two down the line. I still have my old D-Link router which works fine with one or two people on the network so it'll serve as a guinea pig.

#56 OP vetDirtyLarry

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 22:51

I wouldn't say 3rd party firmware is for power users, I would say its for anyone that is not happy with the native. If there is something you want/need your router and native does not support it. Good chance 3rd party does.

If your router is giving your issues, locks up, have to reboot it to get internet working again, etc.. What would it hurt to try 3rd party, they have a much better support model and update schedule to iron out bugs. Most major routers don't update firmware to add features unless there is a public outcry for it, and rarely fix any sort of bugs again unless reported by a large portion of the user base. Once the device is like 6 months old, good luck seeing any updates - they normally move on to their new model number and just leave the old users hanging for issues.

Nothing saying you have to move to 3rd party day one -- but it is nice to have it there as an option!! I would never suggest anyone buy a router that does not have 3rd party support. You never know what your wanting to do with device 6 months from now that was not part of the native firmware and you thought you would never need to do, etc.

Fair enough points. So I at least got a router that provides the option!!


True, but you'd have to be somewhat of a power user in order to flash your router's firmware. You have to find out if your router can even be flashed with 3rd-party firmware and with some models, you need to take extra steps to get it to work properly. Just imagine how much an average Joe would freak out if he bricked his router because he tried to flash it with the wrong firmware.

If you're tech savvy, then it isn't hard (assuming you do your homework). Most guides are thorough enough, from what I've seen. But if you skip one step or make an error, then chances you've just acquired a new paper weight. I plan on using 3rd-party firmware a year or two down the line. I still have my old D-Link router which works fine with one or two people on the network so it'll serve as a guinea pig.

I have flashed my old Linksys router with Hyper DDRT or whatever it was called, modded a 360 which was a whole bunch of insane steps including hooking up some crazy component to my SATA port, a PSP, and a few other devices over the years. I am fine with the actual steps of changing firmware, so that is not an issue. But I find in my older age I have a lower tolerance for tinkering, and just prefer things work as they should by default if possible. I guess I am not as brave as I once was, and just have way less time then I once did as well.

With the above said, it looks like I am going to have to play with some of the settings regardless next week. I am actually switching back to Verizon FIOS, going to soon be a Quantum customer (75 down 35 up :punk: ), and it is my understanding you must use the router they supply to you in order to get every feature they offer, such as the guide, etc. So it sounds as if I will be setting this Asus router up as an Access Point and not my main router. Slightly bummed about this fact since I just purchased it, but I really did not anticipate that I would be going back to Verizon so soon (it was door to door salesmen that got me back with them, not kidding). Setting it up as an AP looks easy enough from the brief research I have quickly done, they even have a wizard to do it if needed, and the hit on overall performance should be negligible.

#57 Yusuf M.

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:12

I have flashed my old Linksys router with Hyper DDRT or whatever it was called, modded a 360 which was a whole bunch of insane steps including hooking up some crazy component to my SATA port, a PSP, and a few other devices over the years. I am fine with the actual steps of changing firmware, so that is not an issue. But I find in my older age I have a lower tolerance for tinkering, and just prefer things work as they should by default if possible. I guess I am not as brave as I once was, and just have way less time then I once did as well.

With the above said, it looks like I am going to have to play with some of the settings regardless next week. I am actually switching back to Verizon FIOS, going to soon be a Quantum customer (75 down 35 up :punk: ), and it is my understanding you must use the router they supply to you in order to get every feature they offer, such as the guide, etc. So it sounds as if I will be setting this Asus router up as an Access Point and not my main router. Slightly bummed about this fact since I just purchased it, but I really did not anticipate that I would be going back to Verizon so soon (it was door to door salesmen that got me back with them, not kidding). Setting it up as an AP looks easy enough from the brief research I have quickly done, they even have a wizard to do it if needed, and the hit on overall performance should be negligible.

I hear you man. It's nice to be able to tweak your hardware to get the most out of it. But it's also nice to have something that just works great out of the box with as little tweaking as possible.

I saw your thread about switching back to Verizon earlier. I've heard of ISPs recommending that you use their router and they usually do that with a modem/router combo. That is, a modem that has a built-in wireless router. I doubt it would have a unique feature that makes your Internet work better or anything. I've read posts from people that said they disabled the built-in router to use a different, and often times better, wireless router.

Anyway, I took a look at the specs of the Verizon FiOS router and it doesn't look like it's better than your ASUS RT-N66U. Maybe you should try using that as your main router first and see how things work. It wouldn't hurt to try right?

#58 OP vetDirtyLarry

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 03:11

I hear you man. It's nice to be able to tweak your hardware to get the most out of it. But it's also nice to have something that just works great out of the box with as little tweaking as possible.

I saw your thread about switching back to Verizon earlier. I've heard of ISPs recommending that you use their router and they usually do that with a modem/router combo. That is, a modem that has a built-in wireless router. I doubt it would have a unique feature that makes your Internet work better or anything. I've read posts from people that said they disabled the built-in router to use a different, and often times better, wireless router.

Anyway, I took a look at the specs of the Verizon FiOS router and it doesn't look like it's better than your ASUS RT-N66U. Maybe you should try using that as your main router first and see how things work. It wouldn't hurt to try right?

I worded things weird, I definitely plan on using my Asus as my main router, but have to have it act as an AP off of their router, that is what I meant. I just prefer I did not even have to use theirs at all, but it should not hurt anything as you said, just an extra piece of equipment that if I could get away with not using, I would, but sounds as if they have some proprietary firmware that aspects of their services just will not work without. I guess I will find out this upcoming Tuesday.

I actually took off from work to be home for the switch to FIOS, so I will have a whole day to play around with things until they are good to go. (Y)

#59 nekkidtruth

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 04:07

I worded things weird, I definitely plan on using my Asus as my main router, but have to have it act as an AP off of their router, that is what I meant. I just prefer I did not even have to use theirs at all, but it should not hurt anything as you said, just an extra piece of equipment that if I could get away with not using, I would, but sounds as if they have some proprietary firmware that aspects of their services just will not work without. I guess I will find out this upcoming Tuesday.

I actually took off from work to be home for the switch to FIOS, so I will have a whole day to play around with things until they are good to go. (Y)


Do you not have the ability to put the modem/router combo provided by your ISP into bridge mode? This would force your modem to act as just a modem and disable the router junk from it, allowing you to use your router directly connected to your ISP. Effectively eliminating an extra layer that isn't necessary.

If you're not sure, do a quick search online for your modem model and you should be able to find a guide to do this, or Verizon will possibly do it for you as well.

#60 OP vetDirtyLarry

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 17:57

FIOS is installed, Asus is setup as an AP. These are my speeds over Wireless.
Posted Image

Wired is a tad faster.



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