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Looking for the Best Keyboard

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#16 threetonesun

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 15:21

Just avoid blue all together. Unless you want your keyboard to emulate the sound and volume of a typewriter.


If you bottom them out, yes, if you stop when they click, no.

And anyone who likes the Apple keyboard must be some kind of crazy.


#17 Shaun N.

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 15:23

I've been using the apple keyboard with numpad for a few years now with my PC - nothing has rubbed off and cleans easily.


http://store.apple.c...-numeric-keypad

#18 +Chicane-UK

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 15:37

Apple keyboards are absolutely horrible for gaming and typing for long periods of time.


Really? I use mine the entire day in the office, and then (if I'm not out for the evening) go home and continue to use the same keyboard the whole evening for a mixture of typing or gaming.. I simply do not get any discomfort at all.

I'll stand by it - I think it's one of the best keyboards I've ever owned. The only one which comes close is my old Silicon Graphics PS/2 keyboard. Totally different kind of animal but you can just type SO quickly on them.

And anyone who likes the Apple keyboard must be some kind of crazy.


Not a fan then? I've honestly not met anyone who uses these keyboards for extended periods of time, who doesn't like them. What do you dislike about them specifically?

#19 Arceles

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 15:51

I have blue, it's nowhere near that loud. There's a definite tick, but as loud as a typewriter? No.



Again, it uses red switches which are really bad for typing over long periods.


That's not true, red switches actually require less actuating force, the only thing they don't have is a tactile or sound feedback, that's the very reason for the blue and black switches are preferred for writing, it's very easy to know when to stop applying force to the key. If anything, because red switches require less force, you can hover more easily while writing on the keyboard.

#20 threetonesun

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 15:51

Not a fan then? I've honestly not met anyone who uses these keyboards for extended periods of time, who doesn't like them. What do you dislike about them specifically?


Like most membrane keyboards you can't tell when you've actually pressed the keys. The Apple keyboard has the extra great distinction of being the only one where if you want to make sure you've pressed it, you'll just jam your finger into the housing of the keyboard.

I also just happen to hate chicklet style keyboards for programming, because every time I go to use my right pinky I feel like my hand is just floating over a vast nothingness. I suppose it would bother me less if it was the only type of keyboard I used, but I have IBM keyboards at work, and a mechanical on my desktop, and it makes me realize just how horrid the Apple keyboard is.

#21 Wakers

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 16:55

That's not true, red switches actually require less actuating force, the only thing they don't have is a tactile or sound feedback, that's the very reason for the blue and black switches are preferred for writing, it's very easy to know when to stop applying force to the key. If anything, because red switches require less force, you can hover more easily while writing on the keyboard.


Yea, they require less force and have no tactile feeling when the key actuates, which results in a lot of double-types and requires you to learn how to type again to get your speed and accuracy back up to where it was before. They're not as bad as blacks, granted, and I think they were designed to be a middle ground between blue and blacks for people who didn't just need gaming-optimised keys.

#22 AJerman

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 18:28

I actually have an Apple aluminium keyboard both at home and work, on my Windows PC's.. I absolutely love them for various reasons.

* Look nice
* Very quiet when typing (more appropriate for the office)
* Nice even key layout - none of this ergo crap
* USB ports on the keyboard so ideal for a wireless mouse receiver to plug into one, out of sight
* Really easy to clean - disconnect from the PC, put some cleaning spray onto a cloth and wipe vigorously - key travel is quite short and the keys go level / flush with the base. The surround of the key in the frame is quite narrow meaning not too much debris gets in there.

Definitely my favourite keyboard by a long way - and pretty reasonably priced too (around £30). I game on this keyboard too (on my home PC) and have no problems with it.


I've always been a fan of the minimalism and feel of the Apple keyboards as well. I type very fast and I can't imagine having long throw keys. I'm sure that the feel would be very nice and classic, but I like the incredibly short laptop style keyboards now, I type much faster on them. I'd love to give one of the nice mechanical keyboards a try, but the number one most important thing in a home keyboard for me is wireless, and I don't see many of those in wireless options because most of them are considered "optimized for gaming" and so they stick to wired.

I'm actually looking for a new keyboard myself. My diNovo Edge has just about had it after years of abuse, and I do mean abuse, haha. I've slammed it on the table so many times I can't even believe it's still working. At this point it's just getting a little worn out, having trouble charging and keeping a charge, etc. Being that I sit on my couch to use my computer, I was considering an Apple wireless as well since they feel so well built and compact in size. They are just a little more expensive than I'd like to see.

#23 Aergan

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 18:52

I have had both the full Apple USB and Apple Wireless keyboards and they are very, very nice keyboards for both typing and gaming.

I have just switched to a Microsoft Wedge Mobile keyboard (Neowin did a review) and it too is a pleasure to type on (as I prefer laptop style scissor switches to anything else) and I now prefer it to my previous Apple keyboards for both gaming and coding.

For anyone looking for drawbacks:
Apple Wireless: No delete key, FN key and Command (Windows) key positions are inverted, key map for Grave and backslash is inverted, eject does nothing and can't be mapped.
Microsoft Wedge Keyboard: Media and function keys are inverted e.g. F1 = Play, FN + F1 = F1, cover is ****.

On the plus side, you can type ludicrously damn fast on them!

#24 OP Malek Nyghtson

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 21:26

I thank everyone for their replies

I do not really know any thing about mechanical keyboards in fact til I just recently started looking for a new board I did not even know they still made them.

at the risk of sounding like an idiot what are the benefits of using a mechanical board over non- mechanical boards?

I keep finding boards that I like but are not released yet such as the ROCCAT Ryos MK Pro or the steel series Apex I do like the K95 that was mentioned but again another board I will have to wait for

with the razer boards I have seen a few designs I like but with past experience with their mice I am not sure if I wanna risk it with both the black widow and the deathstalker series I have seen stuff I like I am still researching the differences between mechanical and other boards to see if it would be beneficial to me to switch to a mech board.

Wakers, everything I have been reading says to go with red switches why do you say they are bad for typing over long periods?

when I find something like this that I know very little about I tend to research the hell out of it before making a decision am going to be getting the steel series Merc Stealth for my wife (its the one she wants) but I am still torn atm

#25 xendrome

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 21:30

I just use this one, I don't use macro/programmable keys, - http://amzn.com/B000H6AY6M

#26 threetonesun

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 21:41

I thank everyone for their replies

I do not really know any thing about mechanical keyboards in fact til I just recently started looking for a new board I did not even know they still made them.

at the risk of sounding like an idiot what are the benefits of using a mechanical board over non- mechanical boards?

I keep finding boards that I like but are not released yet such as the ROCCAT Ryos MK Pro or the steel series Apex I do like the K95 that was mentioned but again another board I will have to wait for

with the razer boards I have seen a few designs I like but with past experience with their mice I am not sure if I wanna risk it with both the black widow and the deathstalker series I have seen stuff I like I am still researching the differences between mechanical and other boards to see if it would be beneficial to me to switch to a mech board.

Wakers, everything I have been reading says to go with red switches why do you say they are bad for typing over long periods?

when I find something like this that I know very little about I tend to research the hell out of it before making a decision am going to be getting the steel series Merc Stealth for my wife (its the one she wants) but I am still torn atm


The main advantage of mechanical keyboards is that you can get some switches which have tactile feedback (browns and blues), meaning you can actually feel when the key has been pressed, much like older mechanical keyboards. Since the key usually strikes halfway through it's travel, you can type faster as you're not trying to bottom out the key every time, you can stop when you get the feedback. The only advantage of the red/black switches is that they're less vague then membrane based keyboards, at the very least you'll feel when they bottom out, also the reds are relatively light switches, making them a bit lighter to type on than your average membrane keyboard.

As my wife put it, it's like the difference between playing the piano, and playing a cheap keyboard. Sure, the end result is the same, but the feel on one is a million times better.

Also, stay away from Razr keyboards, they're known for being garbage. If you want something cheap to try out, Amazon sells the Coolermaster Quickfire Rapid, which is built on the same base as the Filco tenkeyless, but costs about half the price.

#27 Arceles

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 21:49

I thank everyone for their replies

I do not really know any thing about mechanical keyboards in fact til I just recently started looking for a new board I did not even know they still made them.

at the risk of sounding like an idiot what are the benefits of using a mechanical board over non- mechanical boards?

I keep finding boards that I like but are not released yet such as the ROCCAT Ryos MK Pro or the steel series Apex I do like the K95 that was mentioned but again another board I will have to wait for

with the razer boards I have seen a few designs I like but with past experience with their mice I am not sure if I wanna risk it with both the black widow and the deathstalker series I have seen stuff I like I am still researching the differences between mechanical and other boards to see if it would be beneficial to me to switch to a mech board.

Wakers, everything I have been reading says to go with red switches why do you say they are bad for typing over long periods?

when I find something like this that I know very little about I tend to research the hell out of it before making a decision am going to be getting the steel series Merc Stealth for my wife (its the one she wants) but I am still torn atm


Is a bit hard to describe... but once you go mechanical, everything else will feel cheap (and I'm not lying, I was a huge laptop keyboard user, I even managed to destroy my old laptop's keyboard by typing a lot in it) mechanical keyboards work by using individual switches in them, each one of them normally has a spring and a metal filament that does contact with another. Most famous switches are the cherry ones, they normally differentiate in color and in tactile and sound feedback. Red switches are nice for gaming, although not so much recommended for writing (to be honest I both enjoy gaming and writing on this red switches), the reason for this is that they don't offer auditive nor tactile feedback (a mechanical switch actuates far before of reaching the end travel of the key) but they require less actuation force (the force that you apply with the finger is so little that with practice your hands "hover" in the keyboard), blue switches are very noisy, so noisy that some wives have forced their husbands to change keyboards (no lie here) BUT they tell you when they key has been pressed and therefore you don't need to apply force anymore, the tactile feedback offers that precisely, when you are pressing down the keys you can feel an small bump that tells you that the key has been successfully actuated... many people like this sensation.

Highly recommended that you go and test one by yourself, they tend to be a bit on the expensive side, but they keys also last far longer than a normal keyboard, is very likely that you wont require another keyboard for a loooooong time.

#28 Ezaura

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 01:25

http://www.overclock...-keyboard-guide

Pretty decent guide.

If you bottom them out, yes, if you stop when they click, no.


You essentially develop the habit of bottoming them out anyway, because you get acclimatised to the click feedback.

#29 Wakers

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:24

http://www.overclock...-keyboard-guide

Pretty decent guide.



You essentially develop the habit of bottoming them out anyway, because you get acclimatised to the click feedback.


What? No you don't.

The bottoming out sound should be used to train yourself not to press it all the way down. When you pick that up your typing speed increases exponentially. You know that the click happens before bottoming out, right?

It takes a while to get used to, but it's well worth making the effort.

#30 threetonesun

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 12:11

You essentially develop the habit of bottoming them out anyway, because you get acclimatised to the click feedback.


Should be the other way 'round. They go click - clunk, and you can stop at the click.

For anyone not using a mechanical wondering wtf that means, try tapping the keys on your keyboard. More than likely they'll make a faint clicking noise, and if you do it lightly enough, there's maybe a 70% of a character appearing on the screen. With a mechanical with feedback, you can reliably stop at the click.