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Texas woman has two sets of identical twins in one day

houston the womans hospital cesarean section 4 boys

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#16 Original Poster

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 12:16

what does their birth weight have to do with how big they will turn out...

......
I cannot be bothered to explain it my self, if it was a serious question then read this..

http://aje.oxfordjou.../8/726.full.pdf

there is a lot of uneeded information but it shows my point as their is very defined correlation of data


#17 Kami-

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 12:26

You're right. Even if two of them were identical twins and the other two were fraternal (non-identical), they'd still be considered quadruplets for being born at the same time.

Isn't it something to do with them being on separate placentas ? -.-

#18 HawkMan

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 12:44

......
I cannot be bothered to explain it my self, if it was a serious question then read this..

http://aje.oxfordjou.../8/726.full.pdf

there is a lot of uneeded information but it shows my point as their is very defined correlation of data


which is irrelevant in this case anyway as with all multi births they are born premature, and/or smaller then regular despite the adult size of each baby being the same as if they had been born at full weight and size at 9 months.

and even, then. I can tell you that baby weight from my experience have little to do with actual adult height.

#19 Yusuf M.

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 12:46

Isn't it something to do with them being on separate placentas ? -.-

No. It has to do with how many babies are delivered. Most twins have separate amniotic sacs but share the same placenta. Only a small percentage of twins, and all non-identical twins, have their own amniotic sac and placenta. I'm not an expert but I don't think that affects the chances of having twins, triplets, or quadruplets. It's still a mystery to scientists. They don't know why a zygote splits to form more than one embryo. They do, however, have a better idea about non-identical twins (where two fertilized eggs attach themselves to the uterine wall).