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Posted

I hope they remember to carry lots of ice.

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Posted

This new ship is a great idea and will provide for an amazing experience and I see nothing wrong with bringing back a replica of a very good design, even by today's standards.

It's refreshing to see them build a ship that isn't a top heavy pile of crap like modern cruise ships. Most modern ships tend to capsize when they take on even small amounts of water. Take the concordia for example. It only flooded TWO watertight compartments and it capsized within a couple of hours. The Titanic was opened to water by the iceberg over the length of FIVE compartments (SIX if you count the damage stretching into the coal bunker of boiler room 5) and it stayed upright for the entire duration of the sinking, a feat that is amazing in and of itself.

The big problem with Titanic was the height of the bulkheads as Javik pointed out. They were lowered to E deck (10 feet above the waterline) because Ismay didn't want first class passengers to have to deal with blockages caused by watertight bulkheads that went up any further. Had the bulkheads been just two decks higher the Titanic would have been able to stay afloat with the damage that she sustained during the collision, and oddly enough original plans called for a design that would have allowed her to float with up to 6 compartments flooding, a design that was later implemented in Olympic and Britannic after Titanic sank.

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Posted

:o

People who were lucky enough to go first class on Titanic where rich people who owned big businesses at the time I guess? So it probably is reasonable price for them.

This new ship is a great idea and will provide for an amazing experience and I see nothing wrong with bringing back a replica of a very good design, even by today's standards.

It's refreshing to see them build a ship that isn't a top heavy pile of crap like modern cruise ships. Most modern ships tend to capsize when they take on even small amounts of water. Take the concordia for example. It only flooded TWO watertight compartments and it capsized within a couple of hours. The Titanic was opened to water by the iceberg over the length of FIVE compartments (SIX if you count the damage stretching into the coal bunker of boiler room 5) and it stayed upright for the entire duration of the sinking, a feat that is amazing in and of itself.

The big problem with Titanic was the height of the bulkheads as Javik pointed out. They were lowered to E deck (10 feet above the waterline) because Ismay didn't want first class passengers to have to deal with blockages caused by watertight bulkheads that went up any further. Had the bulkheads been just two decks higher the Titanic would have been able to stay afloat with the damage that she sustained during the collision, and oddly enough original plans called for a design that would have allowed her to float with up to 6 compartments flooding, a design that was later implemented in Olympic and Britannic after Titanic sank.

It was also said that where the iceberg hit the side of the ship, the machine wasn't used to screw in the big screws but were hand screwed in because they couldn't get the machine to where the screws where.

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Posted

People who were lucky enough to go first class on Titanic where rich people who owned big businesses at the time I guess? So it probably is reasonable price for them.

It was also said that where the iceberg hit the side of the ship, the machine wasn't used to screw in the big screws but were hand screwed in because they couldn't get the machine to where the screws where.

Yea, the extreme bow and stern were riveted by hand because the machine would not fit in those areas. They were also iron rivets instead of steel since iron was easier to use by hand. Steel rivets were used where the machine would fit. Of course you also have the issue where original spec called for grade 4 rivets and they eventually settled for grade 3 which had more slag due to budget concerns. Either way they actually tested the rivets and didn't really see much of a problem with them as far as their ability to sustain unusual stresses. Of course they're going to snap under thousands of tons of force that would be exerted on the hull during a collision with a block of ice upwards of 3 times the size of the ship. They figure no ship of the time would have had a chance of coming away from that collision without significant damage.

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Posted

I'm sure the new one will have the latest & greatest radar system, satellite images and other tech gadgets that the first one didn't have.

I am sure about this too.

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Posted

Why not name it Titanic? As there isnt a ship called that anymore.

Also If it sinks at least there won't be a policy of "Women and Children First". That'd be sexist :rofl:

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Posted

Hitting the iceberg head on or making the internal water compartment walls go to the top of the ship may of kept part of it a float.

The other ship that got the distress call and ignored it would of saved a lot of people as well.

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Posted

Hitting the iceberg head on or making the internal water compartment walls go to the top of the ship may of kept part of it a float.

The other ship that got the distress call and ignored it would of saved a lot of people as well.

Californian (the "other ship") never actually received the distress call. Their wireless operator went to bed at 11:30. 10 minutes before the collision. Titanic was one of the few ships on the ocean that had 2 wireless operators and said radio was manned 24/7.

And you are correct, hitting the iceberg head on would have resulted in one, MAYBE two compartments flooding, and with some minor repairs the ship would have actually been able to proceed under her own power, albeit at reduced speed.

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Posted

All laughing and joking aside, I for one would like to see it built, It was a majestic ship.

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Posted

All laughing and joking aside, I for one would like to see it built, It was a majestic ship.

+1, I honestly consider it to be one of the best looking ships ever built. Not to mention the sheer size. I know it pales in comparison to some of the new cruise ships, but everything on Titanic was on a huge scale, from the 4 gigantic funnels right down to the anchors that weighed 15 tons each.

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Posted

I think it's in extremely poor taste.

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Posted

I think it's in extremely poor taste.

Sorry, I fail to see how...

If it repeats the same mistakes, then that's sheer stupidity, ships sink, people still book cruises, planes develop faults and fall out of the sky, people still fly etc...

Now I apologise if this story hits a little too close to home (you may have had a distant relative that either had something to do with it's construction, or journeyed on it, then I retract my statement as it is indeed, at least for you in poor taste)

But in order for humankind to continue growing and evolving, we do have to keep pushing forward, remembering not to mistakes that can endanger or worse, life.

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Posted

Sorry, I fail to see how...

If it repeats the same mistakes, then that's sheer stupidity, ships sink, people still book cruises, planes develop faults and fall out of the sky, people still fly etc...

Now I apologise if this story hits a little too close to home (you may have had a distant relative that either had something to do with it's construction, or journeyed on it, then I retract my statement as it is indeed, at least for you in poor taste)

But in order for humankind to continue growing and evolving, we do have to keep pushing forward, remembering not to mistakes that can endanger or worse, life.

This isn't about a guy building just a ship though, and offers nothing in somehow advancing humankind.

This is about a guy who wants to build a clone of a ship which was in a tragic even where 1,500 people died and re-enact the journey.I fail to see how this can be seen as anything but poor taste.

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Posted

It was also said that where the iceberg hit the side of the ship, the machine wasn't used to screw in the big screws but were hand screwed in because they couldn't get the machine to where the screws where.

Rivets are not actually screwed, what happens is that rivets are heated to an incredibly high temperature, hammered through pre-cut holes in the steel. The back end of the rivet is then flattened and the rivet is allowed to cool. Once the rivet cools it contracts and pulls the 2 metal plates together creating an incredibly forceful seal that holds the plates together.

As for the actual point of this question, using the riveting machine in the bow section of the ship was a physical impossibility as the tapering of the bow needed to make it effectively cut through the water simply didn't grant enough room for the machine to do it's work. However if it's done properly hand riveting should not significantly weaken a ship. There is a suggestion that the rivets were of substandard quality and contained too much aluminium slag (a by product of the smelting process), which could have weakened their structure but historical accounts are contradictory. The investigation done by Seconds From Disaster did suggests the rivets were weak, but other investigations have came to opposite conclusions. However what is not debated is that when the iceberg impacted the hull of the titanic it created an absolutely immense amount of force, somewhere in the realm of 12,000lb of force. Most analysts agree that even the most well made rivets of the era would have struggled to survive such an immense amount of force.

In reality the fact is that the Titanic was a pretty well built ship and it essentially encountered unforseen structural forces that it simply could not survive.

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Posted

snapback.pngHum, on 27 February 2013 - 19:47, said:

Palmer claims Titanic II will be the safest cruise ship in the world

Heard that before :p

I bet God Himself can't sink Titanic II. :shifty:

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