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Boy runs up enormous iTune bill in minutes

england zombies vs ninja app purchases ipad apple lawsuit

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#16 n_K

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 03:12

I think people are missing off what really happened.
the dad entered the password to make a purchase thinking it was free
http://www.bbc.co.uk...ristol-21629210
'Danny Kitchen, from Bristol, was using the family's iPad when father Greg put in a pass code, believing his son was downloading a free game.'


#17 Growled

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 03:43

He should have made sure it was a free download with no catches and not taken his son's word for it. Entirely the parent's fault. They had a passcode on there for a purpose.

#18 -T-

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 05:02

While in retrospect it's clear he should have had in app purchases disabled. Who would have ever thought a free game would have add ons at £70 a time, that's just disgusting

#19 dead.cell

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 05:13

Parental oversight should play a role but that doesn't excuse predatory and immoral business practices. Apple should be taking a hard stance on charges like this, as it is completely unreasonable for in-app charges to amount to huge amounts more than the price of a second hand car in such a short amount of time without the explicit consent of the account holder. When you're talking about thousands of pounds in charges for trivial in-game items there should be a cooling-off period to ensure that users are not falling victim to deceptive business practices.

I was astonished by the price of some in-game items in "free" games on the Android market, with bundles being offered for in-game credits costing as much as £70. We're not talking about apps targeting at affluent individuals; we're talking about games aimed at kids, where items are locked out if you don't buy such credits. They shouldn't consider themselves lucky that Apple refunded the money; the app developer should consider themselves lucky that they're not being sued.


Honestly, it's not surprising to me at all. One of my best friends fell into depression recently, and racked up $1500+ in expenses on Guild Wars 2. Needless to say, he had a problem. He got refunded though, I guess when he realized how serious he screwed up... I dunno. It's like a gambling addiction to some I suppose.

I'd be much more involved with what apps my kids were downloading anyway. Maybe set them up with an account which was only usable with preloaded iTunes cards, if possible. No way in hell I'd give anyone a password which allows them to make purchases from my credit/debit card. That's just... man, that's just stupid, no doubt about it.

#20 -Razorfold

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 05:24

Honestly, it's not surprising to me at all. One of my best friends fell into depression recently, and racked up $1500+ in expenses on Guild Wars 2. Needless to say, he had a problem. He got refunded though, I guess when he realized how serious he screwed up... I dunno. It's like a gambling addiction to some I suppose.

Did he rack up $1500 in 10mins? This "game" charged their credit card multiple times automatically for a total of $2200 in 10-15mins of gaming. THAT'S the screwed up bit.

The parents should have checked before putting in the password but who would have thought that it could amount to that many charges in that short a time?

#21 LUTZIFER

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 05:40

I wouldn't be able to sit down on my @ss for a year if I had of done something like that as a kid.

And yeah, I totally agree with others saying parents need to pay more attention to what their kids are doing and stop letting them play with things they shouldn't be touching.

#22 Veiva

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 05:48

I'm more alarmed that a five year old was on an iPad. I was raised in the 90s and I did not touch a video game until I was in the 6th grade... Why, because of technological advances, do parents feel the need to neglect important aspects of childhood--such as playing outside and getting dirty, or writing/reading/drawing? I remember a study done that indicates parents who do not let their children use their imagination tend to be unable to creatively express themselves later on (that's probably a big "DOH!"). Now that I'm older I'm saddened I didn't play outside more, or read more, or draw more (despite me doing it all the time as a kid)! The drudgery of everyday life, especially the almighty computer in the modern world, make me cherish the moments I was really free of them.

#23 dead.cell

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:39

Did he rack up $1500 in 10mins? This "game" charged their credit card multiple times automatically for a total of $2200 in 10-15mins of gaming. THAT'S the screwed up bit.

The parents should have checked before putting in the password but who would have thought that it could amount to that many charges in that short a time?


No, but that's irrelevant, isn't it? We can talk about horrible business models, pricing, and so forth until we're blue in the face, but so long as you give a kid access to something that can pull money out of your account, whether it's 5 minutes or 5 days, you're still an irresponsible person. Considering the purchases that can be made in some games, it's definitely worth noting at least.

Posted Image
(yes, I know how RMAH works but just a helpful image to demonstrate the ugly side of "micro"transactions)

#24 Simon-

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 13:32

Turning off in-app purchases is not exactly an obvious setting for most parents, you would have to go digging to find that it even exists even if it is obvious to us geeks (and geek parents) who are more resourceful.

My advice to others is to use iTunes Gift Cards instead to limit the potential charges that can be accrued Also it is very common to find discounted iTunes Gift Cards so it saves money also.

#25 Detection

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 13:40

That is disgraceful, allowing an app on the market to charge that sort of money for a game

#26 MightyJordan

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 13:42

That is disgraceful, allowing an app on the market to charge that sort of money for a game

In my opinion, this one is more disgraceful...

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#27 Detection

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 13:45

In my opinion, this one is more disgraceful...

Posted Image


Geez, does anyone know what the app does ? Apart from make the dev rich

#28 MightyJordan

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 13:47

Geez, does anyone know what the app does ? Apart from make the dev rich

Here's a detailed video walkthrough...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Os2axzJHbzA

#29 Scorbing

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 13:49

OK and who's fault is that? The kid's or the irresponsible parents?

I say the parents.

#30 D. S.

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 13:54

parents should have enable restrictions, that will make any in-app purchase to require a password. by default there is only a ok/cancel button to confirm the purchase...

It did. They inputted it so he would be quiet about it without paying any attention to what it entailed. And then this kind of thing happens.