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First Haswell performance benchmarks hit the web


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#16 vcfan

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 22:49

the point of haswell is its power efficiency more than performance. the igp only has 4 more execution cores,what did people expect? haswell will allow thinner,lighter,cheaper, less power hungry and more powerful tablets and notebooks. devices like the surface pro and acer w700 will cost beginning at $599,have all day battery and be thinner and lighter.


#17 Enron

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 22:58

Not much of an increase. Should I stick with getting a 3770K for my new build then?

#18 RvXtm

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 22:39

I'm still on a q9400, but if i do an upgrade this year, it will probably be hanswell ... i'm waiting to see the the price points.

#19 TheExperiment

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 22:45

I'm going to stick with my i7 920 till it dies. Intel will probably be talking about it's i7 7770 chips by then.

I kinda feel the same way, but I've been extremely irritated with this system from time to time...I'd like to replace it with Kaveri but I'm not sure I really need to spend the money when I'll have a PS4 soon.

#20 mattmatik

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 22:57

Ok, I'll bite...why do we need Intel's blessing for a review? I get that they want the test environment to be 'optimal' but to me that just sounds like they will find the best binned chip and have control over the results.

#21 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 23:04

Release Ivy Bridge-E or "Intel, go home".


Well, I'd rather they release Haswell-E.

#22 Osiris

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 23:38

the point of haswell is its power efficiency more than performance. the igp only has 4 more execution cores,what did people expect? haswell will allow thinner,lighter,cheaper, less power hungry and more powerful tablets and notebooks. devices like the surface pro and acer w700 will cost beginning at $599,have all day battery and be thinner and lighter.


I agree that Haswell will be more about battery life and achitecture to allow thinner devices, but $599 for a pro and all day battery is a pipe dream for even Haswell devices. In light battery saving mode haswell will hopefully hit 8 hours but again, an icore and 1080p screen you have to keep at such low settings to get a full days battery life out of, isnt really that beneficial to people.

The temash and baytrail chips offer larger respective performance gains, larger respective video gains, they are already cheaper than icores and last longer, and imo where most of the tablet market is going to potentially head to until you can get your icores as thin, light, with as long battery and at the same price point.

#23 Growled

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 00:09

Decent increases but nothing overwhelming.

#24 George P

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 00:42

I dunno about battery life for these but even if you gain at best another 2hrs on a Surface Pro 2 with one of these lots of people would say it's worth it. Would it bring prices down? Maybe a bit but I don't expect much. At best it could help cut the price by $100 but at the same time OEMs want to try and see prices and their margins go higher. If you want lower price then you'll have to go with atom or ARM.

#25 +Phouchg

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 10:36

Well, I'd rather they release Haswell-E.

That would be sometime around 2016, if their current pacing is any indication.
But what would it give? No efficiency improvements - same 22 nm. Doesn't have IGP anyway. Just bring 8 physical cores to desktop and I'm a happy guy.

#26 PGHammer

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 13:45

I'm still on a q9400, but if i do an upgrade this year, it will probably be hanswell ... i'm waiting to see the the price points.


I'm on a Q6600 (which my mom will get when I upgrade to i5-3570K) - unless you run niche applications that make heavy usage of hyperthreading, I would stick to Ivy Bridge, not Haswell.

1, First off, Haswell will require a new motherboard, new chipset, and a different CPU socket than Sandy Bridge/Ivy Bridge - all of which are pricey on launch. (The only reason that wasn't the case for Ivy Bridge is that it used the same socket, and, by and large, the same chipsets as Sandy Bridge; further what new chipsets that WERE launched simultaneously with Ivy also supportewd Sandy.)
2. Simultaneously, Haswell's launch WILL lead to price cuts - not just as those that DO upgrade sell existing hardware, but as existing hardware (CPUs and motherboards) take it on the chin price-wise. (Look at what happened to Z68 motherboards when Z77 launched - immediate price cuts of thirty percent, at minimum.)
3. Going by the initial benchmarks, Haswell will target the high end of portable computing and servers more so than general computing - especially given the high prices of Haswell at launch and price cuts hitting Ivy.

Save your money - stick to Ivy Bridge.

#27 +Livin in a box

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 20:03

Not much of an increase. Should I stick with getting a 3770K for my new build then?

I tend to agree with what PGHammer has said above me (if no one else posts before I do :p)

For most people, Ivy Bridge will likely not be bottlenecking most people for a while, and that includes gamers. I myself am on Sandy Bridge and I don't intend to upgrade at least until next year at the earliest, when (I believe, correct me if I'm wrong) DDR4 RAM will be officially supported by Skylake.

You will also save a decent amount of money as well that you can use to spend on other components of your PC.

#28 TheExperiment

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 00:06

3. Going by the initial benchmarks, Haswell will target the high end of portable computing and servers more so than general computing - especially given the high prices of Haswell at launch and price cuts hitting Ivy.

Save your money - stick to Ivy Bridge.

http://en.wikipedia....roarchitecture)

Now that I've read that, there's no way in hell I'd pick Ivy over Haswell. I don't know about the processors but the motherboards should be considerably cheaper.

#29 tnt118

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 00:27

I only do a build every 5 years or so so I'm not entirely in the loop, but wouldn't haswell be more future proof in terms of chipset for upgrades down the road?

#30 TheExperiment

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 00:28

I only do a build every 5 years or so so I'm not entirely in the loop, but wouldn't haswell be more future proof in terms of chipset for upgrades down the road?

See my post.

Yes.



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