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Woman fired for selling Girl Scout cookies at work

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#16 SupportGeek

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 14:11

Thankfully, this situation (if it in fact unfolded as the article says it did) is illegal here in Canada.


The article notes that she was terminated for violating the company policy on solicitation, company policy is certainly on her employment agreement form that she signed and would be filed with HR when she was hired.
That would certainly make her dismissal with no warnings legal, even in Canada.

Also to anyone who suggests the CHILD should sell the cookies - please just stop with your high and mighty attitude


Its pretty clear that Girl Scouts think the cookies should be sold by the Scout, or does the COO of Girl Scouts of America also have a "high and mighty attitude" when she says the sales should be lead by the girls.


#17 Geoffrey B.

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 14:19

I have 2 problems with this, 1) she was never properly warned that what she was doing was not approved. and 2) Why don't kids sell Girl scout cookies anymore. I never see a Kid selling them, just parents.

#18 Charisma

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 14:25

Nowhere in this article does it say the girl wasn't selling her own cookies, just that her mother was also. A lady here does the same thing, sells some to us (because hello, we want them) but her daughter still does it herself as well.

This is just silly >.<

#19 Icanect C

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 15:52

The article notes that she was terminated for violating the company policy on solicitation, company policy is certainly on her employment agreement form that she signed and would be filed with HR when she was hired.
That would certainly make her dismissal with no warnings legal, even in Canada.



Its pretty clear that Girl Scouts think the cookies should be sold by the Scout, or does the COO of Girl Scouts of America also have a "high and mighty attitude" when she says the sales should be lead by the girls.


You make a statement in the name of Girl Scouts of America - "Its pretty clear that Girl Scouts think the cookies should be sold by the Scout". According to the Girl Scouts of America's own FAQ - "Who can sell Girl Scout Cookies? All girl members may participate in the Girl Scout Cookie Program. Although parents and Girl Scout adults may assist girls, it is the girl who makes the sale, sets learning and sales goals, and learns the entrepreneurial skills that are part of the program. Participation in the Girl Scout Cookie Program is voluntary."

That supports your statement that the GIrl Scouts of America intend to have the cookies sold by the scout. Fair. and I agree that the child should be the primary here. However, it is well known in many locations across America parents take Girl Scout cookies to work to help their child - and I don't see anything wrong with that, either. Nothing higher and mighty about that. However, for anyone to suggest that ONLY a child should sell cookies and think is unfathomable that a parent has the inclination to help their child sell cookies - is higher than thou attitude. Let's be real you are judging this women for helping her daughter sell cookies for the girl scouts- this is hardly the first time this has been done. I could see if she was forcing cookies down everyone throats; or bringing in cookies on flat bed trucks but she wasn't. So stop judging this woman and keep your unrealistic opinions to yourself.

My opinion is even if a company has a soliciation policy - parents should still be able to sell girl scout cookies. I think we can all agree (though maybe not) that Girl Scout cookies is not exactly a soliciation nor would it's business be affected, that is sheer pettyness on the employers part and again I am thankful I do not work for such idiots. As I am sure the executives of that company bring boy/girl scout cookies into headquarters for their own kids - but hey let's not talk about that.

#20 nekkidtruth

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 19:38

The article notes that she was terminated for violating the company policy on solicitation, company policy is certainly on her employment agreement form that she signed and would be filed with HR when she was hired.
That would certainly make her dismissal with no warnings legal, even in Canada.


Incorrect. If she wasn't aware that she was violating company policy (and the fact that she did this not one, not two but three years in a row without consequence indicates she wasn't aware) they would be required by law to at least provide a written warning before termination. You're simply assuming she signed off on some piece of paper that said "I will not sell Girl Guide Cookies". There's a reason labour laws exist. If we're going to assume so much about this situation, let's assume she was an outstanding employee. She never missed a single shift in 12 years and was never late. Is it still reasonable to fire her without warning?

#21 Growled

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 00:41

This is just silly >.<


I'm wondering if we have the whole story here. Maybe there was another reason they wanted to get rid of her and just used the cookies as an excuse.



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