Jump to content



Photo
uk bt fibre broadband fttc fttp

  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1 Crisp

Crisp

    To infinity and beyond

  • 5,465 posts
  • Joined: 06-May 10
  • Location: 127.0.0.1

Posted 06 April 2013 - 21:57

BT Fibre Broadband on Demand prices revealed: From £700 for FTTP

BT has revealed prices for its FTTP on Demand plans which show that prices for full fibre broadband start at £700 per installation.
The one-off cost to upgrade an FTTC (Fibre to the Cabinet) line to the full FTTP (Fibre to the Premises) service will include a £500 fixed fee with an extra cost based on distance - to reflect the cost of building the last mile connection to your home or business.

This distance-based cost will vary but will start at £200. Openreach estimates that in most cases (55 per cent), people will incur a distance cost between £200 and £1,000.

Posted Image

So in most cases if you’re lucky enough to be connected to BT’s FTTC network you can expect to pay between £700 and £1,500 if you want the real fibre deal.

For the other 45 per cent, things start to get really expensive. Openreach says that virtually all other places will need to pay anything between £1,400 and £3,500 for the fibre, on top of the £500 flat fee. This means for places located a good distance away from street cabinets, things will cost anything between £1,900 up to £4,000.

Note that these prices, all exclude VAT and reflect the cost that Openreach (not BT Retail) will set FTTP On Demand at. So, it’ll be up to ISPs to decide how these charges will be passed on to you, the customer.

What's more is that installation won't be exactly speedy either. You're looking at a 60 day wait for things to be up and running. Then there's the £38/month cost on top of that for the actual broadband service.

Fibre to the Premises is more desirable than FTTC as it provides faster download speeds and is more future-proofed; tests have shown that BT’s FTTP lines can handle speeds of up to 10Gbps. Top speeds currently available on BT’s FTTP lines can reach 330Mbps.

While this is head and shoulders above what most home users need at the moment, businesses will no doubt find some use for a 330Mbps broadband line. And perhaps just as well - at those prices, most UK homeowners won’t be able to entertain the idea of FTTP On Demand for a while yet.

From April 29 onwards, FTTP On Demand will launch in the wholesale space, meaning ISPs like Plusnet and Zen Internet, who’ve been trialling 330Mbps fibre services, could well launch their own FTTC-FTTP upgrade packages.


Source


#2 -Razorfold

-Razorfold

    Neowinian Senior

  • 9,777 posts
  • Joined: 16-March 06
  • OS: Windows 8
  • Phone: Nokia Lumia 900 / Oneplus One

Posted 06 April 2013 - 22:02

What's more is that installation won't be exactly speedy either. You're looking at a 60 day wait for things to be up and running. Then there's the £38/month cost on top of that for the actual broadband service.

In America I pay more than that to get ****ty 15mbps internet...

Granted I don't really have to pay the 700 pounds installation fee but still.

#3 +InsaneNutter

InsaneNutter

    Neowinian Senior

  • 3,693 posts
  • Joined: 15-March 03
  • Location: Yorkshire, England
  • OS: Windows 8.1 & OSX 10.9
  • Phone: OnePlus One

Posted 06 April 2013 - 22:09

Expensive, however a worthwhile investment for people who own a house and plan to stay there.

Too bad all we have been able to get from BT in the last 10 years is 2mbps ADSL2, thankfully Virgin have always been great here and we enjoy 100mbit for £30 a month.

#4 vetSleeper

Sleeper

    Neowinian Senior

  • 1,854 posts
  • Joined: 16-August 01
  • Location: Sunderland. UK

Posted 06 April 2013 - 22:13

Just had Infinity 2 installed yesterday. Can't believe I waited so long to make the jump. Getting the max possible so far from the 80/20 and can't see me needing anything faster for a while to come.

#5 sagum

sagum

    Unicorn Doctor

  • 1,817 posts
  • Joined: 09-October 08
  • Location: England
  • OS: Mac OS X 10.9 / Windows 7/8.1
  • Phone: LG E900 & Lumia` 610/520/920

Posted 06 April 2013 - 22:49

"to reflect the cost of building the last mile connection to your home or business"

I assume this means applying for digging the path up, actually laying down pipe, covering it up. Then having the fiber line actually pushed in and spliced into to the cab and termination point.

If they're going to be using existing piping or even bringing down from the telegraph poles, I think it's a little excessive to charge a fixed fee of £500 just to run some fiber and splice it in. If they're digging the roads up, I'm going to assume they'll be reusing the conduit pipe for other users and still charge them the same.

Still, I can see end consumers having to tack on another few bob for the cost of the FC adapters and FC router too. I'll be interesting to see if the ISPs bundle that lol ;)

#6 FlintyV

FlintyV

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,377 posts
  • Joined: 14-December 06
  • Location: Great Britain

Posted 06 April 2013 - 22:52

If I could get anything other than the bog standard Max ADSL I'd certainly stump up the cost. I'd love fibre.

#7 primexx

primexx

    Neowinian Senior

  • 12,750 posts
  • Joined: 24-April 05

Posted 06 April 2013 - 23:00

In America I pay more than that to get ****ty 15mbps internet...

Granted I don't really have to pay the 700 pounds installation fee but still.


I was just about to say... that's only $60 which is what my 25/2.5 costs without my student deal, and even cheaper than Google Fibre. That's dirt cheap for FTTP.

#8 vetneufuse

neufuse

    Neowinian Senior

  • 16,867 posts
  • Joined: 16-February 04

Posted 06 April 2013 - 23:12

In America I pay more than that to get ****ty 15mbps internet...

Granted I don't really have to pay the 700 pounds installation fee but still.


I'm on Comcast and I pay almost exactly that in USD for 50 Mbit :huh:

#9 Jan

Jan

    It's not a Navy boat, it's a Gravy boat

  • 4,013 posts
  • Joined: 02-September 09
  • Location: England
  • OS: Windows 8.1, Android L
  • Phone: Nexus 5

Posted 06 April 2013 - 23:13

I have Infinity and I couldn't be happier.

Posted Image

#10 -Razorfold

-Razorfold

    Neowinian Senior

  • 9,777 posts
  • Joined: 16-March 06
  • OS: Windows 8
  • Phone: Nokia Lumia 900 / Oneplus One

Posted 06 April 2013 - 23:23

I'm on Comcast and I pay almost exactly that in USD for 50 Mbit :huh:

I'm on Comcast too. Basically my monthly bill is:

$180 in total for HDTV (no premium channels and no equipment rental since we have tivo), 15mbps internet and phone.

If I look at the breakdown it's about $49 a month for internet by itself plus $7 modem rental, 38GBP is $58. So not more but close enough.

#11 jren207

jren207

    Neowinian

  • 377 posts
  • Joined: 06-February 04
  • Location: Lincolnshire, UK
  • OS: Windows 7
  • Phone: Samsung Galaxy Nexus

Posted 06 April 2013 - 23:37

I have Infinity and I couldn't be happier.

Posted Image


Posted Image

Same here. I was getting so impatient waiting for BT to get my cabinet done, but it happened, and I could never go back to ADSL. Those poor speeds, and random disconnections, urgh!
But now it's installed, I don't have to mess around with it, I just get on with watching YouTube videos...

I don't see the need for FTTP at this moment in time, but it would be nice of course... mostly for bragging rights really though ;).

#12 +Majesticmerc

Majesticmerc

    Resident Idealist

  • 6,138 posts
  • Joined: 24-August 05
  • Location: United Kingdom
  • OS: Arch Linux / Win 7
  • Phone: HTC One X

Posted 06 April 2013 - 23:41

The installation cost isn't entirely unreasonable methinks. I don't know what the process would entail to be honest though. We've got people upgrading the gas main on the street at the minute, and they've only dug up some specific parts of the road, not the whole thing. It's all done by threading stuff down pipes for the gas main, I'd expect fitting the FTTP would be similar.

That said, it'd still be a fairly big undertaking. I mean, the road would have to be dug up, the cables installed. The rental of the machinery would be pretty pricey, and the inconvenience cost would be pretty high too.

Does anyone know if NTL Virgin Media is FTTP or FTTC?

#13 vetneufuse

neufuse

    Neowinian Senior

  • 16,867 posts
  • Joined: 16-February 04

Posted 07 April 2013 - 00:15

I'm on Comcast too. Basically my monthly bill is:

$180 in total for HDTV (no premium channels and no equipment rental since we have tivo), 15mbps internet and phone.

If I look at the breakdown it's about $49 a month for internet by itself plus $7 modem rental, 38GBP is $58. So not more but close enough.


And you only have 15Mbit? Wow, Comcast upgraded our "Normal" aka "Preferred" internet tier to 25Mbit 2yrs ago up here... Blast is 50Mbit and "powerboosts" up to 90Mbit... The lowest normal tier was suppose to be upgraded to 20Mbit minimum across the country last month... I guess Comcast loves their East coast more *lol* heck I can get FTTP here at 305Mbit for $300 a month.... with a dedicated fiber to the node

#14 -Razorfold

-Razorfold

    Neowinian Senior

  • 9,777 posts
  • Joined: 16-March 06
  • OS: Windows 8
  • Phone: Nokia Lumia 900 / Oneplus One

Posted 07 April 2013 - 00:38

And you only have 15Mbit? Wow, Comcast upgraded our "Normal" aka "Preferred" internet tier to 25Mbit 2yrs ago up here... Blast is 50Mbit and "powerboosts" up to 90Mbit... The lowest normal tier was suppose to be upgraded to 20Mbit minimum across the country last month... I guess Comcast loves their East coast more *lol* heck I can get FTTP here at 305Mbit for $300 a month.... with a dedicated fiber to the node

You guys also have more competition. Cablevision, Time Warner, Verizon etc. Where I live the only provider is Comcast and like AT&T DSL. So we're pretty much screwed lol.

#15 Sandor

Sandor

    Neowinian Senior

  • 3,959 posts
  • Joined: 28-November 03
  • OS: Win 8.1

Posted 07 April 2013 - 01:01

Running the cable is generally at least a 2 man job (especially if it's underground) and if it's over even a fairly short distance (few hundred metres) it can take a few hours. So the cost of the manpower alone can add up.

It then requires an engineer to install the FTTP equipment in your house which adds more time.