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A Montana man whose 12-year-old golden retriever ate five $100 bills hopes to be reimbursed by the federal government.

Wayne Klinkel tells the Independent Record that his dog Sundance ate the bills while he and his wife were on a road trip to visit their daughter.

Klinkel says he carefully picked through the dog's droppings, and his daughter recovered more when snow melted.

He says he washed the remnants of the bills and taped them together and sent them to the Treasury Department's Bureau of Engraving and Printing with an explanation of what happened.

The bureau's website says an "experienced mutilated currency examiner" will determine if at least 51 percent of a bill is present and eligible for reimbursement. The process can take up to two years.

source

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Daaamn!

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Daaamn!

I second that sentiment

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There's nothing unusual about this story. Badly damaged bills can be recovered if they meet certain criteria.

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In the UK if you mutilate currency it is a criminal offense and you are ultimately responsible for your pet's behavior. However, I'm quite sure that there's process to replace mutilated currency also, so... um... not sure what point I was trying to make so... dude went through his dogs poop ;)

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WOW, that is some expensive **** right there!

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I remember walking into a bank or post office when I was younger, a woman in tears with one of the staff, both of whom were carefully trying to separate ?3000 worth of notes that went through the washer and turned into a paper mache lump

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Good Luck with that.. That sucks..

When he tries to pay his bills, do you think he can use the excuse "my dog ate my bill money?". lol

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The same rule applies in the UK - there has to be at least 51% of the note present - and they have to verify the bits are from the same note.

It's a long process!

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I dunt want to be the currency examiner :s

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and a dog ate my homework too... sigh..

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The same rule applies in the UK - there has to be at least 51% of the note present - and they have to verify the bits are from the same note.

It's a long process!

That seems like a very hard task when there are 5 bills that have most likely been chewed and shredded together. Unless this guy is a master poopsifter and put the bills together properly... I don't think anything will be recovered.

And 2 years. That is a insane amount of time for anything. Are they that backed up with other bills that there is a wait? Or is it just something that the government says so they most likely won't ever have to do anything in hopes that as time passes, so does memory?

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and a dog ate my homework too... sigh..

Bad dog!

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