41 posts in this topic

Posted

Sweet, looks like he is going to ramp up again now that CCtCap has been announced! Fun times...

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Posted

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BigelowBEAMCloseup_NASA4X3.jpg

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Posted

Really looking forward to this, wish Bigelow aerospace would make some more documentation publicly available about everything they are doing :-)

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Posted

There hasn't been much to tell. They were ready but commercial crew lagged because of short funding. To preserve their money they went into hibernation until NASA decided to pay for BEAM so they could qualify the tech at ISS.

Now commercial crew providers have been selected, the large launchers needed are preparing to fly BA-330 and larger habs (Falcon Heavy, SLS and BFR) are coming.

Just last week NASA Admin. Gen. Bolden repeated, again, that he expects Bigelow habitats to be used in the ISS follow-on.

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Posted

Bigelow's BEAM module all packed up and ready to ship to KSC and fly to ISS on Dragon.

b6de3023739cadacd235038a6cf0e108.jpg

From todays Bigelow's Aerospace newser, attended by NASA and others

@spacecom

Bigelow says he interested in moon first then mars. Easier to learn on moon before moving further.

>

Bigelow wants two b330 modules ready for launch in 2018 assuming crew transport available. Too early to discuss uses, tenants.

>

Officials from Japan Manned space Systems Corp* here along with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries

*Japan Manned Space Systems Corporation (JAMSS)

http://www.jamss.co.jp/en/index.html

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Posted

Parabolic Arc has posted their coverage of the presser comments. Worth a look

http://www.parabolicarc.com/2015/03/12/54848/

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Posted

Smart. SMART. That, my friends, is great strategy at work. Bigelow Aerospace and SpaceX have the "Keys to the Kingdom" right now. Orbital needs a couple of good flights to be back in the running.

 

To be fair, the idea of reusing the old Russian engines was not a terrible one, but since the fault wasn't the engines after all, we'll have to sit back and see what happens. Let's hope that the Assembly Crews check for the silica material being present in the fuel tanks before assembly in the future. If there's another engine-related failure during launch, Orbital will need to rethink using those Russian-sourced parts in their rockets. I personally hope things go well for them.

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Posted


[b]Bigelow Aerospace and NASA


Execute NextSTEP Contract to Study B330 Utilization[/b]

7/31/2015

NASA has executed a contract with Bigelow Aerospace for the company to develop ambitious human spaceflight missions that leverage its innovative B330 space habitat. The contract was executed under the Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships (NextSTEP) Broad Agency Announcement issued by NASAs Advanced Exploration Systems program.

Via its NextSTEP contract, Bigelow Aerospace will demonstrate to NASA how B330 habitats can be used to support safe, affordable, and robust human spaceflight missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond. As the name indicates, the B330 will provide 330 cubic meters of internal volume and each habitat can support a crew of up to six. Bigelow expandable habitats provide much greater volume than metallic structures, as well as enhanced protection against radiation and physical debris. Moreover, Bigelow habitats are lighter and take up substantially less rocket fairing space, and are far more affordable than traditional, rigid modules. These advantages make the B330 the ideal habitat to implement NASAs beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) plans and will support the utilization of transportation systems such as the SLS and Orion. Additionally, the B330s, which will initially be deployed and tested in LEO, will be used as private sector space stations that will conduct a wide variety of commercial activities.

Were eager to work with NASA to show how B330s can support historic human spaceflight missions to the Moon and other destinations in cislunar space while still staying within the bounds of the Agencys existing budget, said Bigelow Aerospaces President and founder, Robert T. Bigelow. NASA originally conceived of expandable habitats decades ago to perform beyond LEO missions, and we at Bigelow Aerospace look forward to finally bringing that vision to fruition.

dual-b330s-lunarorbit.thumb.png.e783830a

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Posted

Extreme efficiency of valuable payload space and the ease of repair if damage occurs from MMDI events (even self-sealing!). Gotta love these modules, and I never get tired of reading about Bigelow's advances. All they're waiting on is a ride uphill for testing/proving of the technology, but I suspect that is a formality at this point. We all know it's going to be a rousing success. :yes:

Makes ya wonder what Bigelow is cooking up next. :)

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Posted

BA-2100. 2x the volume of ISS in one module.

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Posted

BA-2100. 2x the volume of ISS in one module.

And just like that, 65 years of Aerospace Engineering gets trounced with a single module. Gotta love forward thinking!

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Posted

These units mounted to a rigid backbone with a gravity ring is what we need...i.e. DocM's Nautilus picture. There is no way that I can think of to bypass the health concerns of weightlessness for long duration missions unless we have one/several gravity rings...Cheers....:D

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Posted

You bypass it with speed: getting to Mars in 3-4 month's vs 9-12. That's SpaceX's plan: keep the flight as short or shorter than an ISS expedition, something we have experience with. 

Also: there's been progress in the artificial magnetosphere from by the guys & gals at CERN & LHC. Apparently their new magnet materials could be embedded in a spacecraft's hull and run at higher temps. Starting a new thread about it.

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Posted

You bypass it with speed: getting to Mars in 3-4 month's vs 9-12. That's SpaceX's plan: keep the flight as short or shorter than an ISS expedition, something we have experience with. 

Also: there's been progress in the artificial magnetosphere from by the guys & gals at CERN & LHC. Apparently their new magnet materials could be embedded in a spacecraft's hull and run at higher temps. Starting a new thread about it.

True, but symptoms are beginning to be problematic at 4 to 6 month's and compound from there for longer stays, especially for bone density, internal organ placement/shaping, blood pumping differentials and skin thickness. Even being on Mars, the gravity is 38% that of Earth...better, but long term problems still present for very extended stays. I also assume the 3-4 months is when Mars is in direct route due to Mars 687 day orbit.....or use very fast ships to get to furthest distance in that time. 4 months out, 4 months there and rotation back in 4 months for 12 month exposure...otherwise a gravity ring in orbit would be a rehab station with indefinite stay time in space. I am a little pessimistic with all the new idea's since we need something concrete in a decade, and I am reasonably sure nothing of "a game changer" will be available by then. We have over 20 years of space testing and we have not really improved the medical issues with weightlessness, in fact, we are still being surprised by issues cropping up. Just personal opinion, but I feel that astronauts will have to endure hardships that we could fix right now with available technology and still work on the issues of weightlessness. I assume with natural progression, things will forge ahead as is, and in a couple of decades, after medical issues come front and center, a re-evaluation of gravity rings will be forefront. Don't mind me, it's just one instance where scifi writers have hit the nail on the head and some tend not to notice.....Cheers....

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Posted (edited)

After early setup missions the fleet would fly to/from Mars every 2 years, when Earth and Mars are closest. As for 38% gravity, indications are it's enough. That shield of CERN's may be useful in Mars as well, though for permanent habs regolith over an underground or recessed structure is easier & KISS and we have experience building similar structures on Earth. Western pioneers used them extensively. Add inner air restraint layers & airlock and you're in business.

 

 

Edited by DocM
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Posted

After early setup missions the fleet would fly to/from Mars every 2 years, when Earth and Mars are closest. As for 38% gravity, indications are it's enough. That shield of CERN's may be useful in Mars as well, though for permanent habs regolith over an underground or recessed structure is easier & KISS and we have experience building similar structures on Earth. Western pioneers used them extensively. Add inner air restraint layers & airlock and you're in business.

 

 

True, 38% is vastly better than weightlessness, and in my opinion, one could stay on Mars for long duration with shielding, which is the next big item needed. The pioneer structures I am familiar with were what we called "soddy's", and they were almost bullet proof with walls many feet thick of sod and rock. Several years of stay on Mars is definitely possible with radiation shielding, but some rehab will still be required when back on Earth again...myself...I would stay on Mars and a crowbar couldn't get me to come back.....:D

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